Archive | February, 2014

<div id="DPG" webReader="214.00767116"><div class="side-bar" webReader="-16.814159292"><div class="c10"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/jon-erik-kawamoto-vital-stats-box.jpg"/></div><h3 class="article-title c11">Vital Stats</h3><a href="http://facebook.com/JKConditioning" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"></a><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/facebook-social-icon.png" class="c12"/><a href="http://instagram.com/jkconditioning" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"></a><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/instagram-social-icon.png" class="c13"/><a href="http://twitter.com/JKConditioning" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"></a><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/twitter-social-icon.png" class="c13"/><p><strong>Name:</strong> Jon-Erik Kawamoto, CSCS, CEP<br /><strong>Owner:</strong> Personal Trainer & Fitness Writer<br /><strong>Website:</strong> <a href="http://www.jkconditioning.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">JKConditioning.com</a></p></div><p>The barbell is calling your name. You've been going to the gym for a quite a while now, and you're comfortable doing the usual lower body machine exercises. Now you feel like you're ready for a new challenge, and you're sure it should involve barbells. But how, and to what end?</p><p>You could go a couple of different ways here. You could tinker around on those thin-handled barbells over by the dumbbell racks, doing your best to perform squats, lunges, and Romanian deadlifts in a crowd of people doing curls and presses.</p><p>Or you could step into the squat rack or onto the platform, make the commitment to learn how to handle an Olympic bar and plates, and work toward the goal of a nice, round number.</p><p>Don't sell yourself short. Get serious, learn proper form, and make yourself proud in the weight room this year!</p><h3 class="article-title">Who is Barbell Training For?</h3><p>Lower-body free-weight training is an entirely different beast compared to lower body machine-based exercise. The leg press, knee extension, and leg curl machines have their place, but if you want to develop lower body strength and power, you're going to have to squat and deadlift.</p><p>These closed-chain kinetic exercises—meaning your feet are in contact with the floor—challenge your legs, core, and hip stabilizer muscles in a totally unique fashion. If physique transformation is your goal, they provide a more powerful full-body stimulus than any machine, in half the time. These exercises also have better transference to athletic qualities such as sprinting and jumping.</p><img src="images/2014/road-to-two-plates-graphic-3.jpg" width="560" height="660" border="0" class="c14"/><h6 class="altH6 c15">Barbell Deadlift</h6><p>You'll hear people brag about big numbers, but ignore them for now. No matter what comes afterward, 225 in the squat or deadlift is a respectable milestone for any non-powerlifter, amateur athlete, or weekend warrior.</p><p>A 200-plus deadlift is also a tough but realistic goal for most fit women. I've known many who've already achieved it, and many more who can. The back squat is a more difficult lift for many women to go heavy, but squatting heavier than bodyweight is still a worthy goal to start, and this program can get you there.</p><p>Endurance athletes like distance runners, cyclists, and rowers can also benefit from adding heavy squats and deadlifts to their injury-prevention routine. Lifting greater than bodyweight improves neuromuscular efficiency to the fast-twitch type-II muscle fibers; and it has been shown in studies to lead to better performance in endurance sports. Despite the "thin and weak" stereotype, endurance athletes can benefit immensely from more strength—and don't worry, 225 isn't a number that you'll need to get "bulky" to achieve.</p><p>So what's the best approach to reach two plates on each side of the barbell? Well, first and foremost, you need to be able to execute each lift with optimal biomechanics. Once you get the form down, just take that light weight you move around, and make it heavier.</p><h3 class="article-title">The Essentials of the Squat</h3><div class="side-bar"><h4 class="c16">High Bar Back Squat Technique Checklist</h4><ul class="dpg-list c17"><li>Feet shoulder-width apart with a slight toe turnout</li>
<li>Heels flat on the floor (or on plates)</li>
<li>Bar placed on the traps with a double overhand grip on the bar with your elbows pointing downward and shoulders back</li>
<li>Knees pressed outward</li>
<li>Bar pulled into the traps</li>
<li>Pull hips toward bottom position</li>
<li>Weight distribution is mid-foot to heel</li>
</ul></div><p>A number—be it, 225, 425, or 75—means nothing if it's done with bad form: knees caved, torso doubled over, and a back that looks like it's about to break. I'm only interested in helping you <em>own</em> the number, and that means squatting with your hip crease dipping below your knee crease at the bottom of the squat, which is referred to as an "ass-to-grass" squat.</p><p>If you can't squat that deep, well, you're in the company of many, many gym-goers. But you're not off the hook! Just place a 10-pound plate under each heel. This will create a slight anterior weight shift and make up for tight ankles. Still, drive your knees out and keep most of your weight from your mid-foot to your heel.</p><p>There should be a slight lean in your torso, and your lower and upper back should have good alignment without excessively rounding or arching.</p><p>Last, your knees should be held outward, with your feet roughly shoulder-width apart and your heels flat on the floor. Ideally, you would have a barbell on your back in the "high bar" position, resting mainly on your trapezius muscles and the upper ridge of your shoulder blades.</p><img src="images/2014/road-to-two-plates-graphic-1.jpg" width="560" height="370" border="0" class="c14"/><h6 class="altH6 c15">Back Squat</h6><p>A great tip from the world of powerlifting is to push your knees out as if you were spreading the floor with your feet. This results in greater stability as your hip muscles tighten up to hold your knees outward.</p><p>Pull the bar into your traps as if you are trying to break it across your back. This cue will activate your lats, create more torso stability, and prevent you from falling forward.</p><h3 class="article-title">The Essentials of the Deadlift</h3><div class="side-bar"><h4 class="c16">Conventional Deadlift Technique Checklist</h4><ul class="dpg-list c17"><li>Feet hip-width apart, pointing straight forward</li>
<li>Double overhand grip on the bar with straight elbows</li>
<li>Hips pushed back, with chest out and shoulders back</li>
<li>Abs braced and lats engaged. Get tense!</li>
<li>Lock deadlift out with strong glute squeeze</li>
<li>Return bar to floor with straight spine and knee bend</li>
<li>Reset bar on floor before each rep (no bouncing)</li>
</ul></div><p>The hip hinge is the major movement pattern involved in a conventional deadlift. Essentially, the hips act like a hinge and flex, while your torso leans forward and your shins stay relatively vertical—that's the difference between a hinge and a squat. No ass-to-grass here; the hip motion is primarily back-and-forth rather than up-and-down.</p><p>As with the squat, however, the spine stays aligned and doesn't round or extend during a deadlift. But you should feel more tension in your hamstrings than a squat, particularly at the bottom of the movement, where the bar is on the ground.</p><p>Also, make sure you perform this movement with soft or slightly bent knees. We're not doing stiff-legged deadlifts here.</p><p>To perform a conventional deadlift, step up to the bar with a hip-width stance. Bend your knees and hips, and grab the bar with a double overhand grip to the outside of your shins.</p><p>Push your hips back and puff out your chest. Your spine should be straight with your shoulders just in front of the barbell and slightly higher than your hips.</p><div class="center"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/road-to-two-plates-graphic-2b.jpg" width="483" height="317"/></div><p>The squat (left) is a quad-dominant exercise. The hip-hinge (right) is the major movement patter of a deadlift, in which the hips act like a hinge and flex, while your torso leans forward and your shins remain vertical.</p><p>Brace your abs and engage your lats. As with the squat, you should feel most of your balance and body weight from mid-foot to heel. With your chin slightly tucked in, stand up with the bar, keeping it close to your body.</p><p>Finish with a deliberate hip extension and glute squeeze. Don't lean back excessively; this places unwanted stress to your lumbar spine. Now slide the bar down your thighs as you push your hips backward. Once the bar passes your knees, sit the bar back to the floor. Reset your position and prepare for the next rep.</p><h3 class="article-title">The Road to 225</h3><p>The best way to get stronger and better at a lift is to perform it more frequently throughout the week. This plan will focus on getting your high-bar back squat and conventional deadlift to 225 in a straightforward, systematic way, using three full-body workouts per week. Here, I'll just illustrate the squat and deadlift routine; feel free to add any upper-body lifts as you see appropriate, as long as they don't detract from the work you do here.</p><p>For the first workout, use a weight you can confidently lift for 5 sets of 5 reps, but which still feels somewhat heavy. If you're successful at completing all reps in each set, add weight in 5-pound increments and attempt to perform all 5 sets of 5 reps the following week.</p><p>Keep moving up in this manner until you hit what feels like a limit. Don't attempt a rep if you suspect you might not make it; just end the set. If you fail and your reps go like this: 5, 5, 4, 3, 3, use the same weight the next week, and attempt all 5 sets of 5 reps again.</p><div class="cool-fact" webReader="11"><h3>Details, Details</h3><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/coolfacts-bluebar.gif" class="c19"/><p>Mixed grip or overhand? Sumo or conventional? Straps, belts, or nothing at all? Focus on learning the squat and deadlift movements first. You may find later that a mixed grip or a sumo stance is more comfortable at heavier weights.</p></div><p>For Wednesday's workout, use a submaximal weight (roughly 60 percent of the weight used on Monday) and perform speed deadlifts. The execution of the deadlift is the same; however, the bar is to be lifted as fast as possible with correct form. For the jump squat, execute the squat as written above, but explode from the bottom position and jump off the ground. Land lightly and prepare for the next rep.</p><p>Last, for Friday's workout, start with a light weight and perform 5 reps. Add a little bit of weight, and after your rest, perform another 5 reps. Keep adding weight over the next 5-6 sets to reach the maximum weight you can perform 5 reps with, which is called your 5-rep max (5RM). In week two, work up to a max set of 3 reps. In week three, work up to a max set of 1 rep.</p><p>This program can be performed month after month until you reach 225 or a different goal number in each lift. You'll notice a deload week in the fourth week to allow your body to recover before the next phase.</p><h4>Week 1</h4><div id="meal-plan-table"><ul class="defined"><li class="rowBgColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')">Barbell Deadlift</a></strong><br />5 sets of 5 reps, 2 min. rest</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/31/Male/t/31_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/31/Male/t/31_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')">Barbell Squat</a></strong><br />5 sets of 5 reps, 2 min. rest</span></li>
</ul></div><div id="meal-plan-table"><ul class="defined"><li class="rowBgColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')">Speed Deadlift</a></strong><br />8 sets of 3, 30 sec. rest</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('freehand-jump-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/108/Male/t/108_1.jpg" alt="Freehand Jump Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('freehand-jump-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/108/Male/t/108_2.jpg" alt="Freehand Jump Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('freehand-jump-squat')">Freehand Jump Squat</a></strong><br />8 sets of 2, 30 sec. rest</span></li>
</ul></div><div id="meal-plan-table"><ul class="defined"><li class="rowBgColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')">Barbell Deadlift</a></strong><br />Work up to 5RM, 2 min. rest between sets</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/31/Male/t/31_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/31/Male/t/31_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')">Barbell Squat</a></strong><br />Work up to 5RM, 2 min. rest between sets</span></li>
</ul></div><br /><h4>Week 2</h4><div id="meal-plan-table"><ul class="defined"><li class="rowBgColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')">Barbell Deadlift</a></strong><br />5 sets of 5 reps, 2 min. rest</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/31/Male/t/31_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/31/Male/t/31_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')">Barbell Squat</a></strong><br />5 sets of 5 reps, 2 min. rest</span></li>
</ul></div><div id="meal-plan-table"><ul class="defined"><li class="rowBgColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')">Speed Deadlift</a></strong><br />8 sets of 3, 30 sec. rest</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('freehand-jump-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/108/Male/t/108_1.jpg" alt="Freehand Jump Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('freehand-jump-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/108/Male/t/108_2.jpg" alt="Freehand Jump Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('freehand-jump-squat')">Freehand Jump Squat</a></strong><br />8 sets of 2, 30 sec. rest</span></li>
</ul></div><div id="meal-plan-table"><ul class="defined"><li class="rowBgColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')">Barbell Deadlift</a></strong><br />Work up to 5RM, 2 min. rest between sets</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/31/Male/t/31_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/31/Male/t/31_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')">Barbell Squat</a></strong><br />Work up to 5RM, 2 min. rest between sets</span></li>
</ul></div><br /><h4>Week 3</h4><div id="meal-plan-table"><ul class="defined"><li class="rowBgColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')">Barbell Deadlift</a></strong><br />5 sets of 5 reps, 2 min. rest</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/31/Male/t/31_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/31/Male/t/31_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')">Barbell Squat</a></strong><br />5 sets of 5 reps, 2 min. rest</span></li>
</ul></div><div id="meal-plan-table"><ul class="defined"><li class="rowBgColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')">Speed Deadlift</a></strong><br />8 sets of 3, 30 sec. rest</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('freehand-jump-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/108/Male/t/108_1.jpg" alt="Freehand Jump Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('freehand-jump-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/108/Male/t/108_2.jpg" alt="Freehand Jump Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('freehand-jump-squat')">Freehand Jump Squat</a></strong><br />8 sets of 2, 30 sec. rest</span></li>
</ul></div><div id="meal-plan-table"><ul class="defined"><li class="rowBgColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')">Barbell Deadlift</a></strong><br />Work up to 5RM, 2 min. rest between sets</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/31/Male/t/31_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/31/Male/t/31_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')">Barbell Squat</a></strong><br />Work up to 5RM, 2 min. rest between sets</span></li>
</ul></div><br /><h4>Week 4</h4><div id="meal-plan-table"><ul class="defined"><li class="rowBgColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')">Barbell Deadlift</a></strong><br />3 sets of 5 reps (70% of week prior's weight), 2 min. rest</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/31/Male/t/31_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/31/Male/t/31_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')">Barbell Squat</a></strong><br />3 sets of 5 reps (70% of week prior's weight), 2 min. rest</span></li>
</ul></div><div id="meal-plan-table"><ul class="defined"><li class="rowBgColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')">Speed Deadlift</a></strong><br />6 sets of 3, 30 sec. rest</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('freehand-jump-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/108/Male/t/108_1.jpg" alt="Freehand Jump Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('freehand-jump-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/108/Male/t/108_2.jpg" alt="Freehand Jump Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('freehand-jump-squat')">Freehand Jump Squat</a></strong><br />6 sets of 2, 30 sec. rest</span></li>
</ul></div><div id="meal-plan-table"><ul class="defined"><li class="rowBgColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Deadlift" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')">Barbell Deadlift</a></strong><br />3 sets of 3 reps (70% of week prior's weight), 2 min. rest</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c20"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/31/Male/t/31_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/31/Male/t/31_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-squat')">Barbell Squat</a></strong><br />3 sets of 3 reps (70% of week prior's weight), 2 min. rest</span></li>
</ul></div><br /><h4>Recommended For You</h4><div class="c24" webReader="5.60606060606"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/the-misery-machine-4-brutal-fan-bike-workouts.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/4-brutal-fan-bike-workouts-smallbox2.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c23" webReader="7.20779220779"><h4 class="c22"><a href="%20http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/the-misery-machine-4-brutal-fan-bike-workouts.html">The Misery Machine: 4 Brutal Fan Bike Workouts</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Somewhere in almost every gym, there's an elite training apparatus hiding in plain sight. Don't overlook the fan bike. Use it to build athleticism and burn calories the old-school way!</p></div></div><div class="c24" webReader="4.70918367347"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/hitting-315-5-ways-to-breathe-life-into-your-deadlift.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/resuscitate-your-deadlift-small.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c23" webReader="5.79591836735"><h4 class="c22"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/hitting-315-5-ways-to-breathe-life-into-your-deadlift.html">Hitting 315: 5 Ways To Breathe Life Into Your Deadlift</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
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Strength coaches Tony Gentilcore, Dean Somerset, Lee Boyce, and Todd Bumgardner unveil secrets that will supercharge your squat!</p></div></div><br class="c25"/></div>

The Road To Two Plates: You Can Squat And Deadlift 225 Pounds!

Vital Stats Name: Jon-Erik Kawamoto, CSCS, CEPOwner: Personal Trainer & Fitness WriterWebsite: JKConditioning.com The barbell is calling your name. You’ve been going to the gym for a quite a while now, and you’re comfortable doing the usual lower body machine exercises. Now you feel like you’re ready for a new challenge, and you’re sure it […]

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<div id="DPG" webReader="118.243299968"><div class="side-bar" webReader="-16.1785714286"><div class="c11"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/al-kavadlo-vital-stats.jpg"/></div><h3 class="article-title c12">Vital Stats</h3><a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/AlKavadlo/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Bodyspace"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/bodyspace-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c13"/></a><a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/AlKavadlocom-Were-working-out/205151489148" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Facebook"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/facebook-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c14"/></a><a href="https://twitter.com/AlKavadlo" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Twitter"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/twitter-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c14"/></a><a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/alkavadlo" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="YouTube"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/youtube-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c14"/></a><p><strong>Name:</strong> Al Kavadlo, CSCS<br /><strong>Location:</strong> New York, NY<br /><strong>Occupation:</strong> Trainer, author, lead instructor of Progressive Calisthenics Certification<br /><strong>Website:</strong> <a href="www.alkavadlo.com" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">www.alkavadlo.com</a></p></div><p>"<em>The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie—deliberate, contrived, and dishonest—but the myth—persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic. Too often we hold fast to the clichés of our forebears.</em>"<br />- John F. Kennedy</p><p>It's no secret that bodyweight training is my preferred method of working out. As someone who has touted the benefits of calisthenics for a long time, it's exciting to see bodyweight training finally gain some attention from the mainstream. Of course, along with the recent boom in popularity, bodyweight strength training has also experienced some backlash.</p><p>For every person who writes to me about the progress they've achieved with bodyweight training—and how much fun they've had doing it—there's someone else who has concerns about calisthenics. Misinformation persists and when repeated enough, certain myths can become pervasive. Often it's easier to believe the myth than face the truth, especially when the truth lines up with any preconceived biases you might have.</p><p>With that in mind, here are some of the most common misconceptions I've heard about bodyweight strength training. Let the debunking begin!</p><h3 class="article-title">Myth 1: You can't build mass.</h3><p>Since an individual's strength-to-mass ratio has to be favorable to practice high-level calisthenics, many of the folks you see performing them tend to be on the smaller side. I am not particularly massive—a fact pointed out to me often on the Internet—and neither are many other notable bodyweight practitioners, so it's easy to assume that calisthenics can't get you jacked. However, one need look no further than YouTube legends like <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/HannibalForKing1" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Hannibal for King</a> or Bar Brothers' <a href="http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSeD0P39ujjI_EXVY5Y6BIQ" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Lazar Novovic</a> to see proof of the potential to put on size using bodyweight training.</p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/rRlqSvLEfIQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p>Gaining mass has more to do with your diet and your genetics than whether you focus on weights or calisthenics. As long as they get the proper stimulation to grow, your muscles don't really know if the resistance comes from an external object or not. If you train in the appropriate rep range—for hypertrophy, it's somewhere between 6-15 reps with approximately 65-85 percent of your one-rep max, depending on who you ask—get enough food, and sleep eight hours per night, you have all you need to get as huge as your genes will allow.</p><h3 class="article-title">Myth 2: You can't achieve high levels of strength.</h3><p>Just like many people underestimate the mass-building potential of calisthenics basics like pull-ups, push-ups and dips, it is also often assumed that those exercises are the end of the line for building strength with just bodyweight. This is simply not true! Pull-ups, push-ups, and dips are just the beginning. There are many more advanced bodyweight exercises that can build much higher levels of strength.</p><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/4-bodyweight-myths-debunked-1.jpg" width="560" height="274" border="0"/><p>"There are many more advanced bodyweight exercises that can build much higher levels of strength."</p><p>If your primary objective is pure strength, you want to find exercises that challenge you in the 5-or-less rep range. For experienced strength-trainees, moves like one-arm push-ups , pistol squats , and front lever progressions are excellent choices.</p><p>Remember that in strength training, your body only knows that it is being asked to exert muscular force against resistance. The source of that resistance is mostly irrelevant. Though it's easy to simply add weight to a barbell, once you understand the subtleties of manipulating leverage in order to progress or regress a bodyweight exercise, there's no limit to the amount of strength you can achieve!</p><h3 class="article-title">Myth 3: Tall people can't do advanced calisthenics.</h3><p>While taller folks—particularly people with long arms and/or legs—are at a slight mechanical disadvantage for many exercises, many people achieve extremely high levels of calisthenic strength in spite of their height. The idea that a lanky build is unfavorable for strength training is not unique to calisthenics; people with long arms struggle with leverage on both bench presses and push-ups.</p><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/4-bodyweight-myths-debunked-2.jpg" width="560" height="309" border="0"/><p>"At 5-foot-11, I'm tall for calisthenics, but it hasn't stopped me from achieving great things in the world of bodyweight training."</p><p>Though many of us lack the ideal genetic predisposition to excel at the highest level of calisthenics, we all have the potential to exceed our current capabilities. It's healthier and more productive to focus on improving yourself, rather than dwelling on your perceived limitations. At 5-foot-11, I'm tall for calisthenics, but it hasn't stopped me from achieving great things in the world of bodyweight training. If you want to use your height as an excuse, that's your prerogative, but I'd rather focus on what I <em>am</em> capable of, which is a lot!</p><h3 class="article-title">Myth 4: Women can't do pull-ups.</h3><p>Learning to do a pull-up can be a challenge for anyone, but the task tends to be especially daunting for women. Pull-ups require a lot of upper-body strength and women simply don't have the same genetic potential for upper-body strength as men. This does not, however, mean that women are incapable of pull-ups!</p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/t7YIzdSq8TY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p>If you are a lady who wants to dominate pull-ups—my kind of gal—be willing to work a little harder for it! The same advice I gave for tall folks applies here. Instead of focusing on the fact that achieving a pull-up may require more work for you, focus on giving your best effort toward each small step along the way. If you're consistent with your training and chip away slowly, a full pull-up can be yours in time. Be patient, stay focused, and remember that good things come to people who train!</p><p><a href="http://www.dragondoor.com/b73/?apid=4e8cb1ea167b0" rel="nofollow"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/al-kavadlo-streetching-your-boundaries-book-banner.jpg" width="560" height="144"/></a></p><br /><br class="c15"/><h3 class="article-title">Recommended For You</h3><div class="c18" webReader="6.68632075472"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/stretching-for-strength-a-better-approach-flexibility-training.html"><img src="images/2014/stretching-for-strength-smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c17" webReader="8.91509433962"><h4 class="c16"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/stretching-for-strength-a-better-approach-flexibility-training.html">STRETCHING FOR STRENGTH</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Reports of stretching's demise have been greatly exaggerated. In this excerpt from Al Kavadlo's new book, the bodyweight training chief helps you build an effective, personalized practice!</p></div></div><div class="c18" webReader="6.58823529412"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/pistol-perfect-one-legged-squats-and-beyond.html"><img src="images/2013/pistol-squats-and-beyond-smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c17" webReader="9.05882352941"><h4 class="c16"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/pistol-perfect-one-legged-squats-and-beyond.html">PISTOL SQUATS AND BEYOND</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Single-leg squats are a journey, not just a move. commit to a classic lift for strength, balance, and mobility!</p></div></div><div class="c18" webReader="5.72282608696"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/push-yourself-one-arm-push-up-and-beyond.html"><img src="images/2013/one-arm-push-yourself-smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c17" webReader="7.04347826087"><h4 class="c16"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/push-yourself-one-arm-push-up-and-beyond.html">ONE-ARM PUSH YOURSELF!</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Sometimes the toughest strength moves don't involve any iron at all. Heed the call of the one-arm push-up and discover how tough progressive calisthenics can be!</p></div></div></div><div class="padded-content article-content mod-about-the-author" id="article-about-author" webReader="37.5957446809"><h4 class="article-section-header">About The Author</h4><div class="ata-left-column" webReader="6.91304347826"><div class="ata-author-name"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/al-kavadlo.html">Al Kavadlo, CSCS</a></div><div class="author-gradient-button"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/al-kavadlo.html">VIEW AUTHOR PAGE</a></div><p class="ata-author-summary">Al Kavadlo, CSCS is one of the world's leading experts in bodyweight strength training and calisthenics.</p></div><div class="ata-right-column"><div class="ata-author-image-frame"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/al-kavadlo.html"><img src="images/2013/writer-al-kavadlo-sig-new.jpg" alt=""/></a></div><div class="ata-view-all-articles-link"><ul class="bb-chevron-list bold-type"><li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/al-kavadlo.html#articles" class="bold-type">View All Articles By This Author</a></li>
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Bodyweight Bust! Four Bodyweight Training Myths Debunked

Vital Stats Name: Al Kavadlo, CSCSLocation: New York, NYOccupation: Trainer, author, lead instructor of Progressive Calisthenics CertificationWebsite: www.alkavadlo.com “The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie—deliberate, contrived, and dishonest—but the myth—persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic. Too often we hold fast to the clichés of our forebears.“– John F. Kennedy It’s no secret […]

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Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, Weight TrainingComments Off on Bodyweight Bust! Four Bodyweight Training Myths Debunked

<div id="DPG" webReader="154.611379968"><p>The world and most of the gym-goers in it are currently obsessed with weight loss, and understandably so. But as a side effect, it feels like nobody cares about you if your goal is the opposite —to gain weight, especially the right kind of weight. Ectomorphs need help too!</p><p>It can be a challenge to add quality mass that helps you feel stronger and better about how you look. But many have done what you're trying to do, and their wisdom can help you reach size-gain goals you previously thought were off-limits. Forget what hasn't worked in the past; let's make this happen once and for all!</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">1 Free Weights Work</h3>
</p><p>Australian bodybuilding sensation Calum Von Moger knows a thing or two when it comes to building muscle. When he offers guidance, you'd better pay attention, especially when he says to make friends with free weights.</p><p>"My top tip for anyone, particularly beginners in the muscle-building world, is to utilize free weights over machines," he says. "This is crucial for not only developing core strength, but also developing your balance and coordination, which is important if you want to handle heavy compound exercises with correct form. If you use free weights with correct form and moderate to heavy weights, the size will come!"</p><img src="images/2014/size-made-simple-4-ways-to-go-from-small-to-swole-1.jpg" width="560" height="372" border="0"/><p>If you use free weights with correct form and moderate to heavy weights, the size will come!</p><p>If you're used to training with machines, you know their advantage. Namely, you don't have to know <em>how</em> to really use them in order to use them. So when you make the switch, recognize that <em>the way you lift</em> is now as important, or maybe more so, than what particular movement you choose. Simply throwing weight around and trying to imitate what you see other lifters doing isn't enough.</p><p>Recent research has identified mechanical tension, muscle damage, and metabolic stress like cellular swelling and lactic acid buildup as three of the main training factors that influence muscle growth. To maximize all three, you need <em>quality</em> reps and lots of them. Learn how to lift correctly, and then amp up the weights reasonably—"moderate to heavy," as Von Moger says. Going so heavy that you can't manage a full range-of-motion, or that you can't hold proper form, is going to leave you either wondering what went wrong, or sitting at home rehabbing an injury.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">2 Eat A Lot!</h3>
</p><p>Tension, muscle damage, metabolic stress. What's missing from this muscle growth equation? Calories! As Team Cellucor Athlete Daniel Lourenco will tell you, to get big, you have to eat big.</p><p>"In my experience, most people have no idea how many calories they're consuming, and for people trying to add mass, they're usually eating much less than they think they are or intend to," he says. "If you're trying to add size, and especially if you're eating clean, you'd be amazed at how much food it really takes to hit your caloric goals. It's a lot!"</p><div class="side-ad" webReader="-17.3"><div class="c11"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/10-rules-of-alpha-nutrition-smallbox.jpg" width="170" height="97"/></div><h3 class="article-title c12"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/10-rules-of-alpha-muscle-building-nutrition.html">10 RULES OF<br />ALPHA NUTRITION</a></h3><p>Working out but have yet to see gains? It could be your meal plan. Clean up your diet and learn how to pack on the muscle and pass on the pounds with these nutrition tips.</p><div class="c14"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/10-rules-of-alpha-muscle-building-nutrition.html" class="bbButton primaryAction c13">Eat Your Way To Size</a></div><br /></div><p>Does this mean to eat everything in sight? Of course not. As a matter of fact, you have to be just as concerned about what you eat as someone who's looking to lose weight. You need quality sources of protein, a combination of carbohydrates from established sources like oats, sweet potatoes, fruits, veggies, brown rice, and quinoa, and healthy fats from fish, nuts, and seeds. Of course, water is essential too. Take in at least a gallon a day.</p><p>While you're at it, though, remember that food isn't flavored oxygen. Don't inhale your meals! Take your time and remember to chew. It's well-known that eating quickly can negatively impact your digestive system, leaving you feeling bloated and unable to choke down another meal later in the day. But when you chew your food adequately, your body also absorbs nutrients more quickly and more efficiently. Why bother to eat all that food if you're not going to make the most of the nutrients in it?</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">3 Stick With the Basic Supplements</h3>
</p><p>Far too many skinny lifters start their journey to the Promised Land by buying a kiddie-pool-sized jug of low-quality mass gainer full of junk and mystery ingredients. Then they expect it to do most of the work for them. Big mistake!</p><p>News flash: Your training and your diet are where real gains are made. Supplements are just ways to help the same thing happen a little faster, and a little more predictably. Don't depend on them for anything other than a leg up.</p><p>Just as with training and nutrition, you need a strategy when it comes to supplements. Here it is: Until you're making consistent progress, stick with the basics: <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/whey.html">whey protein</a>, <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/creatine.html">creatine</a>, <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/bcaa.html">branched-chain amino acids</a> (BCAAs), and a <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/multi.html">multivitamin</a>. These tried-and-true performance aids will help you get the most out of your training, and they'll boost the areas in your diet that have been shown repeatedly over time to lead to muscle growth. As you progress and make gains, you can reevaluate and look into adding other products.</p><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/cellucor/cellucor.htm"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/cellucor-banner.jpg" width="560" height="144" border="0" class="c15"/></a><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">4 Want It!</h3>
</p><p>Remember that one Christmas present you wanted really, really bad as a kid? You have to want to reach your goals even more than that. You just can't hope this will happen for you. You have to focus all your training energy on the goal of gaining muscle, to the detriment of any others. Now's not the time to obsess about having super-defined abs, or to sign up for that ultra-marathon you read about.</p><img src="images/2014/size-made-simple-4-ways-to-go-from-small-to-swole-3.jpg" width="560" height="461" border="0"/><p>If you want this, you must keep going, even on those days when you will feel like you can't.</p><p>Don't be surprised if your determination puts you at odds with other people and their training goals, or lack thereof. That's fine. Let them go their way. Anyone who aspires to lofty ambitions will have to deal with doubters, haters, and self-questioning. "Will I do it? Can I do it?" You can, and you will.</p><p>There is only one guaranteed way to fail in this project, and that's to quit. If you want this, you must keep going, even on those days when you will feel like you can't. Once you reach your goal, you'll not only enjoy more muscle, you'll have increased mental strength from all the discipline and patience you've needed to get there. Those attributes will serve you well no matter what comes next in your fitness journey.</p><br class="c16"/><h3 class="article-title">Recommended For You</h3><div class="c19" webReader="5.07692307692"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/4-alpha-male-meals-to-build-your-body.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/4-alpha-male-meals-smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c18" webReader="6.24852071006"><h4 class="c17"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/4-alpha-male-meals-to-build-your-body.html">4 Alpha Male Meals To Build Your Body</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Looking to eat like a true alpha male? Return to your caveman roots and feed your muscles with these carnivorous wild-game recipes.</p></div></div><div class="c19" webReader="4.656"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/7-ways-to-pump-up-your-chest.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/7-ways-to-pump-up-your-chest-smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c18" webReader="5.432"><h4 class="c17"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/7-ways-to-pump-up-your-chest.html">7 Ways To Pump Up Your Chest</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
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You don't need to be a strongman competitor to use the lifts! These 7 gym-friendly strongman moves and their variations can help you achieve your strength, fitness, or physique goals!</p></div></div></div><div class="padded-content article-content mod-about-the-author" id="article-about-author" webReader="41.328125"><h4 class="article-section-header">About The Author</h4><div class="ata-left-column" webReader="8.2183908046"><div class="ata-author-name"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/roger_lockridge.htm">Roger Lockridge</a></div><div class="author-gradient-button"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/roger_lockridge.htm">VIEW AUTHOR PAGE</a></div><p class="ata-author-summary">Bodybuilding is the reason I am who I am today. I am more confident in myself, actually looking for the next challenge, and inspiring others.</p></div><div class="ata-right-column"><div class="ata-author-image-frame"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/roger_lockridge.htm"><img src="images/2013/writer-roger-lockridge-sig-new.jpg" alt=""/></a></div><div class="ata-view-all-articles-link"><ul class="bb-chevron-list bold-type"><li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/roger_lockridge.htm#articles" class="bold-type">View All Articles By This Author</a></li>
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Size Made Simple: 4 Ways To Go From Small To Swole!

The world and most of the gym-goers in it are currently obsessed with weight loss, and understandably so. But as a side effect, it feels like nobody cares about you if your goal is the opposite —to gain weight, especially the right kind of weight. Ectomorphs need help too! It can be a challenge to […]

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Ask The Master Motivator: How Can I Motivate My Significant Other To Work Out?

Vital Stats Name: James GrageBodySpace: JamesGrageHeight: 5-foot-10Weight: 175 lbsOccupation: Co-Founder and Vice President of BPI Sports Q “How Can I Motivate My Significant Other To Work Out?” Just like bills and household chores, fitness can mark a tipping point for relationships. It’s a challenge that might be more common than you think: one person wants […]

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Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, NutritionComments Off on Ask The Master Motivator: How Can I Motivate My Significant Other To Work Out?

<div id="DPG" webReader="140.298550063"><div class="side-bar" webReader="-17"><div class="c10"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/body-space-member-of-the-month-jordan-metcalfe-vital.jpg"/></div><h3 class="article-title c11">Vital Stats</h3><a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/Jordz121/" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/bodyspace-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c12"/></a><a href="https://www.facebook.com/officialjordanmetcalfe" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Facebook"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/facebook-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c13"/></a><a href="https://www.facebook.com/officialironplayground" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Facebook"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/facebook-pages-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c13"/></a><a href="https://twitter.com/jordzmetcalfe" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Twitter"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/twitter-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c13"/></a><a href="http://instagram.com/jordzmetcalfe" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Instagram"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/instagram-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c13"/></a><a href="https://www.youtube.com/GymJordz" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="YouTube"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/youtube-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c13"/></a><p><strong>Name:</strong> Jordan Metcalfe<br /><strong>Age:</strong> 22<br /><strong>Weight:</strong> 187 lbs off, 165 lbs contest<br /><strong>Height:</strong> 5'10"<br /><strong>Occupation:</strong> Personal Trainer<br /><strong>Education:</strong> Diploma in Hospitality Management, Bachelor Degree in Business - Double major in Marketing and Advertising, Certified Personal Trainer<br /><strong>Contest History:</strong> IFBB Men's Physique<br /><strong>Athletic Background:</strong> Swimming at a national level in England up to the age of 13. Did nothing really until I started the gym around the age of 17.</p></div><p>BodySpace is home to people from all walks of life, from more than 100 countries, and fitness enthusiasts of all age levels. It is a place where former athletes, first-time weightlifters, and hardened vets merge into a giant news feed of positivity.</p><p>Jordan Metcalfe was a former swimmer who had a lot to learn in the gym. He discovered his ideal lesson plan in 30,000-page library that is Bodybuilding.com. When he found BodySpace, he signed up immediately and used its tools to create a body that's on its way to the IFBB podium!</p><h3 class="article-title">What led you to the decision that you needed to transform?</h3><p>From a very early age I was competing at a national level for swimming. When I decided to move on from the sport I really had nothing to do! I messed around for a few years, but I felt like there was something missing. I had gone from training up to 10 times per week to doing absolutely nothing. I started going to the gym on and off as most young guys do. It was the usual: Go in, lift something way too heavy with form that probably should have killed me, and then leave thinking the gains would come flowing. I was so wrong!</p><p>After a year or so of doing that, I was still a skinny 128 pounds (58 kg). I guess it was a combination of getting bullied at school and just being unhappy with how I looked that got me really committing to a proper lifting routine.</p><h3 class="article-title">What kind of changes have you made since you made that decision?</h3><p>I have totally transformed my physique. Don't get me wrong, I still have a million miles to go, but looking back at how far I have come is my motivation. I started at a skinny 128 pounds and I now weigh a natural 187 pounds (85 kg) at around 9 percent body fat.</p><img class="float-right c14" src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/bodyspace-member-of-the-month-jordan-metcalfe-1.jpg" width="280" height="445" border="0"/><p>"Being able to communicate with people with the same interests is awesome."</p><h3 class="article-title">How did you discover BodySpace?</h3><p>A friend sent me a link to Bodybuilding.com to have a look at the range of supplements because I was looking to get serious with my training, after browsing the website for a bit I came across BodySpace . The whole setup looked awesome, so I signed up right away.</p><h3 class="article-title">How has BodySpace helped you reach your goals?</h3><p>The whole site has helped so much with motivation. Being able to communicate with people with the same interests is awesome. There are some amazing physiques on here, which fuels the passion to constantly improve.</p><h3 class="article-title">Do you stick to one type of training, or do you vary your exercise attacks?</h3><p>Generally I just stick to a single muscle split. No workout will ever be the same. I'm a big believer in keeping the body guessing, whether that's just changing the rep range or adding a totally new exercise. I want to keep shocking the muscle into growth.</p><h3 class="article-title">What is your favorite muscle group to train, and can you give us a sample workout?</h3><p>This has got to be the back muscle group. Genetically it's probably one of my strong points. There is nothing like a good back pump! I do rear delts on back day because they are a weak point.</p><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/bodyspace-member-of-the-month-jordan-metcalfe-2.jpg" width="560" height="165" border="0" class="c16"/><div id="meal-plan-table"><ul><li class="rowBgColor c17"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_1.jpg" alt="Heavy Deadlifts" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/112/Male/t/112_2.jpg" alt="Heavy Deadlifts" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-deadlift')">Heavy Deadlifts</a></strong><br />5 sets of 6-10 reps</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c17"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('seated-cable-rows')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/45/Male/t/45_1.jpg" alt="Seated Cable Row" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('seated-cable-rows')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/45/Male/t/45_2.jpg" alt="Seated Cable Row" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('seated-cable-rows')">Seated Cable Row</a></strong><br />4 sets of 12 reps</span></li>
<li class="rowBgColor c17"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('pullups')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/46/Male/t/46_1.jpg" alt="Pull-Ups" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('pullups')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/46/Male/t/46_2.jpg" alt="Pull-Ups" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('pullups')">Pull-Ups</a></strong><br />2 sets of 10 of each grip reps (Wide grip, medium grip, narrow grip)</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c17"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('one-arm-dumbbell-row')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/13/Male/t/13_1.jpg" alt="Single-Arm Dumbbell Row" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('one-arm-dumbbell-row')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/13/Male/t/13_2.jpg" alt="Single-Arm Dumbbell Row" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('one-arm-dumbbell-row')">Single-Arm Dumbbell Row</a></strong><br />3 sets of 10 reps</span></li>
<li class="rowBgColor c17"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('leverage-high-row')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/892/Male/t/892_1.jpg" alt="Hammer Strength Pull-Down" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('leverage-high-row')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/892/Male/t/892_2.jpg" alt="Hammer Strength Pull-Down" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('leverage-high-row')">Hammer Strength Pull-Down</a></strong><br />4 sets of 8 reps</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c17"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('bent-arm-barbell-pullover')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/49/Male/t/49_1.jpg" alt="Pull-Over" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('bent-arm-barbell-pullover')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/49/Male/t/49_2.jpg" alt="Pull-Over" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('bent-arm-barbell-pullover')">Pull-Over</a></strong><br />3 sets of 15 reps</span></li>
<li class="rowBgColor c17"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('cable-rear-delt-fly')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/867/Male/t/867_1.jpg" alt="Rear Delt Cable Flyes" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('cable-rear-delt-fly')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/867/Male/t/867_2.jpg" alt="Rear Delt Cable Flyes" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('cable-rear-delt-fly')">Rear Delt Cable Flyes</a></strong><br />4 sets of 15 reps</span></li>
</ul><br /></div><br /><h3 class="article-title">You've been on BodySpace for a few years. How do you stay motivated for the long term?</h3><p>Really I think it's just my love and passion for the sport, and also the lifestyle that comes with bodybuilding. I never really suffer from low levels of motivation.</p><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/bodyspace-member-of-the-month-jordan-metcalfe-3.jpg" width="560" height="387" border="0" class="c16"/><h3 class="article-title">What training mistakes did you make when you first started?</h3><p>I don't think there is enough space in this article to name them all! The main ones consisted of lifting too heavy, with horrible form, practicing terrible nutrition, and really just a general lack of understanding when it came to gaining quality strength and muscular development.</p><h3 class="article-title">What are your favorite supplements?</h3><p>I love a good pre-workout. I am taking <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/top-secret-nutrition/pump-igniter.html">Top Secret Nutrition Pump Igniter</a> at the moment —that stuff is insane! Also I'm a big fan of BCAAs, especially when prepping. In my on-season I pop the things like freaking Tic Tacs. They're good for preventing that dreaded muscle catabolism.</p><h3 class="article-title">What had the biggest impact on your muscle growth and recovery?</h3><p>Really, I believe it's a combination of everything. To get the best results, every aspect needs to be in check: eight hours of sleep every night, good nutrition, hard and varied training, supplements, massage, stretching, etc. They all have such an important role in the muscle building and recovery process. When you get to a top level, each aspect becomes even more important. Slacking off in one area will commonly slow your progress right down.</p><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/bodyspace-member-of-the-month-jordan-metcalfe-4.jpg" width="560" height="415" border="0" class="c16"/><h3 class="article-title">What type of music do you listen to in the gym?</h3><p>You might all call me weird, but I don't like to listen to music when working out, whatever is playing in the gym background is fine for me. I have a training partner so I prefer to talk to him, and have him verbally push and motivate me through a set. I find that works best. I have never really understood how people work out together but have their headphones in the whole time. At the end of the day it's whatever works best for that person.</p><h3 class="article-title">You have some serious muscle. Any tips for amassing such a frame?</h3><p>Make sure you have a goal. Once you have it set out clearly, list all the things you must focus on to achieve it. Every aspect must be covered: nutrition, rest, supplementation, and everything else. Focus on keeping workouts fresh and different. I never really do the same workout twice.</p><img class="float-left c18" src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/bodyspace-member-of-the-month-jordan-metcalfe-5.jpg" width="223" height="407" border="0"/><p>"Building your dream physique is bloody hard and it's something you can't really half-ass."</p><p>I'm not going to sugar-coat it. Building your dream physique is bloody hard and it's something you can't really half-ass. It's all or nothing. That's how I look at it, anyway. My dad has always said to me if a job is worth doing then it's worth doing it well. The same principle should be applied to your goals. If it's worth achieving, then do it with 100 percent of your effort.</p><h3 class="article-title">What would it mean to you to win your IFBB pro card?</h3><p>Winning my IFBB pro card would honestly be a dream come true! Being able to take my passion to the international stage would be incredible! So many of the guys I look up to are IFBB Pros. Being able to join them would just be unreal. Bring on that pro card!</p><h3 class="article-title">What is your favorite way to spend a rest day?</h3><p>Honestly, I hate rest days! If it wasn't an essential part of the muscle building process I wouldn't take one. So basically I spend it wishing I was at the gym. Sad, I know.</p><h3 class="article-title">Someone will read this feature and consider joining BodySpace. Why should that person become a part of the largest fitness social network?</h3><p>It's just an awesome environment. There are thousands of people all as crazy as me when it comes down to fitness! Why wouldn't you join?</p><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/bodyspace-member-of-the-month-jordan-metcalfe-6.jpg" width="277" height="333" border="0" class="float-right c20"/><h3 class="article-title">Is there anything you would like to say to your fellow BodySpace members? Have any of them made a special impact on your life?</h3><p>Honestly everyone who I have come across on BodySpace has been amazing. I would just like to thank everyone for motivating me and also supporting me through my journey.</p><h3 class="article-title">Bodybuilders have school, day-jobs and families, and still dedicate hours in the gym each week. How do you strike a balance?</h3><p>Ha! Yeah sometimes it can get tough, but in that situation you have just got to think how bad you want it. I used to work from 6:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., then go straight to the university for night classes from 5-8 p.m., then go to the gym for two hours after that. I would get home at around 10:30 p.m., prep all my meals, pack them all up, get my stuff ready for the next day, and then do it all again. I think if you want something bad enough you will do anything to achieve it.</p><h3 class="article-title">Recommended For You</h3><div class="c23" webReader="5.62445414847"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bodyspace-member-of-the-month-nadal-shaabneh.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/bodyspace-member-of-the-month-nadal-shaabneh-smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c22" webReader="7.23144104803"><h4 class="c21"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bodyspace-member-of-the-month-nadal-shaabneh.html">BodySpace Member Of The Month: Nadal Shaabneh</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
BodySpace is a place of sharing, where people can support and express their appreciation for one another. Members like Nadal make sure this structure is getting stronger all the time.</p></div></div><div class="c23" webReader="6.0152284264"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bodyspace-member-of-the-month-jwethall.html"><img src="images/2013/bodyspace-member-of-the-month-jeremy-djinovic-smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c22" webReader="8.02030456853"><h4 class="c21"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bodyspace-member-of-the-month-jwethall.html">BodySpace Member Of The Month: Jwethall</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Jeremy has worked with DNA mapping and cloning, but his greatest biological success is his own body. He knows he needs heavy weights, and he feeds that need.</p></div></div><div class="c23" webReader="4.75268817204"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bodyspace-member-of-the-month-junglecat.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/bodyspace-member-of-the-month-junglecat-smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c22" webReader="5.84946236559"><h4 class="c21"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bodyspace-member-of-the-month-junglecat.html">BodySpace Member Of The Month: JungleCat, John Lee</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
John Lee has been a member of BodySpace longer than most. He lived the life before it was trendy. Meet the strongest cat in the jungle.</p></div></div><br class="c24"/></div><div class="padded-content article-content mod-about-the-author" id="article-about-author" webReader="36.6347031963"><h4 class="article-section-header">About The Author</h4><div class="ata-left-column" webReader="5.86982248521"><div class="ata-author-name"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bodyspace.htm">BodySpace Member Of The Month</a></div><div class="author-gradient-button"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bodyspace.htm">VIEW AUTHOR PAGE</a></div><p class="ata-author-summary">BodySpace Members of the Month are chosen because they know how to use all the features of BodySpace to their advantage...</p></div><div class="ata-right-column"><div class="ata-author-image-frame"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bodyspace.htm"><img src="images/2013/writer-bodyspace-of-the-month-sig-new.jpg" alt=""/></a></div><div class="ata-view-all-articles-link"><ul class="bb-chevron-list bold-type"><li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bodyspace.htm#articles" class="bold-type">View All Articles By This Author</a></li>
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BodySpace Member Of The Month: Jordan Metcalfe

Vital Stats Name: Jordan MetcalfeAge: 22Weight: 187 lbs off, 165 lbs contestHeight: 5’10”Occupation: Personal TrainerEducation: Diploma in Hospitality Management, Bachelor Degree in Business – Double major in Marketing and Advertising, Certified Personal TrainerContest History: IFBB Men’s PhysiqueAthletic Background: Swimming at a national level in England up to the age of 13. Did nothing really until […]

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Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, NutritionComments Off on BodySpace Member Of The Month: Jordan Metcalfe

<div id="DPG" webReader="297.504723097"><p>By the late 1970s, Arnold Schwarzenegger was no longer just the best bodybuilder in Venice Beach or a six-time Mr. Olympia. On the eve of his 15-mile migration to Hollywood, his level of dominance transcended any superlative or official title. "Arnold was the king," recalls former training partner Danny Padilla.</p><p>The intensity of Schwarzenegger's Gold's Gym workouts, while legendary, couldn't explain it all, or what came afterward. Surely, the Styrian Oak had found some taproot to future success. Ask Arnold himself, as many did, have, and will continue to do, and you'd be likely to get an unsatisfying and straightforward reply. "If there were any secrets, I would have found them by now," he said at the time. His answer was that there was no substitute for hard work.</p><p>Then, against all odds, Arnold became king twice again: First, of the action blockbuster film genre, and then the chief executive of the Great State of California. None of us could say we saw these other victories coming, but when they did, it all seemed to make sense somehow. Three very different crowns, but all three were built on fundamental strengths of this unique giant's mindset.</p><p>Here are six surefire strategies for success that Arnold forged in the crucible of Gold's Gym, and made work for him in every other part of his life.</p><h3 class="article-title">Secret 1: </h3><p>Arnold always stressed the need for rest between sets. But over time, following the advice of trainer Joe Weider, he began devoting an increasing percentage of his rests to what Weider called the "Isotension Principle." You might know it by another name: flexing.</p><p>Here's how it works in its simplest form: After a final set, continue hitting the targeted muscle by flexing to peak contraction for 3-6 seconds. The action maintains connections of myofibrils, the building blocks of muscle, without resistance. The longer and more repeated the flex, the greater those connections, and over time, the greater the tension your muscle fibers will generate.</p><img src="images/2014/6-secrets-of-arnolds-success-1.jpg" width="560" height="290" class="c10"/><p>Arnold set goals to dominate Hollywood and hold political power. He succeeded in spite of all the naysayers.</p><p>This tension—and the ability to hold it for a prolonged period of time—make a competitive bodybuilder stand out onstage. Arnold called posing and flexing a very important part of a bodybuilder's workout, but beyond that, it also helped him extend his mind-muscle connection beyond when he was lifting. You can see it in "Pumping Iron," when Arnold is flexing even at mealtimes—at least, when he's not taunting his fellow competitors.</p><p>Like fellow isotension devotee Bruce Lee, who blazed the path from cult-sport standout to international film star, Arnold continued this practice through his acting career, keeping the mind-muscle connection front and center.</p><p>The lesson for the rest of us: He eliminated the division between his training and his life. Sure, he "rested," but he never took a break from improving, and he never let his skills lapse. His boundless commitment enabled his return to Mr. Olympia competition in 1980, five years after retiring, when he took the crown with just a few weeks to prepare. That seventh win, over then-superior opponents, helped launch Arnold's first action film, "Conan The Barbarian," and he was on his way to a second crown.</p><h3 class="article-title">Secret 2: </h3><p>As Arnold often pointed out, he was intensely loyal to his favorite movements, like <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-incline-bench-press-medium-grip')">incline bench presses</a>, <a href="javascript:pop('concentration-curls')">concentration curls</a>, and <a href="javascript:pop('arnold-dumbbell-press')">Arnold presses</a>. But within and around these exercises, nothing was sacred. He changed weight amounts, switched grips, added reps, paired exercises for opposing muscle groups, and decreased rests or cut them all together. If one day's routine began to feel familiar, he'd perform it in an unfamiliar order or style.</p><img src="images/2014/6-secrets-of-arnolds-success-2.jpg" width="257" height="403" border="0" class="right-image"/><p>One of his favorite ways to turn the norm on its head was to convert barbell exercises to dumbbell movements. His signature dumbbell movement, the Arnold press, came out of this intuitive approach, and the switch helped him identify any right-left imbalances.</p><p>He was never the strongest, but Arnold was always the most proportioned, and this technique was crucial to creating a physique that seemed devoid of weaknesses.</p><p>"Changing constantly really worked for him, and he seemed to grow right before my very eyes," recalls former training partner Ric Drasin. Embracing unpredictability as a way of life kept him ready for anything, and in his later career, helped him make sure his most ambitious career choice achieve the maximum possible impact.</p><p>This is, after all, a man who, en route to promote "Terminator 3" on "The Tonight Show," decided to use the interview to announce that he was running for governor.</p><h3 class="article-title">Secret 3: </h3><p>Arnold's third crown required true mass appeal, and he had it, in the form of 89 percent approval ratings when he took office. Some responsibility for this unprecedented momentum has to be chalked up to his decision to ease out of the 1980s action genre and into lighter fare like comedies, where he co-starred with opposites: Danny DeVito, Helen Hunt, and the cast of "Kindergarten Cop." Such unpredictable pairings came easily for Arnold. He'd been doing it for years.</p><p>Arnold trained with many different lifters at Gold's, but he was inseparable from 5-foot-3 Franco Columbu through the six consecutive Mr. Olympia titles. "Two restless racehorses in the starting blocks" is how Dave Draper, Arnold's first Gold's partner, recalls the two Europeans when they trained together. They may have both spoken with accents and sported similarly tousled hairdos, but far more important was what <em>separated</em> the two: the 100 extra pounds Franco squatted.</p><img src="images/2014/6-secrets-of-arnolds-success-4.jpg" width="560" height="351"/><p>"It's not a tumor!" Arnold's work in comedies made him a household name.</p><p>Standard wisdom pairs partners of more or less equal strength. Not Arnold. He did back days with Frank Zane, shoulders and chest with stronger men, and legs with Mike Katz, whose NFL career-ending leg injury had led to oversized recuperation. Arnold was similarly quick to help other partners learn from his personal strengths, and his strategy became a maxim at Gold's: "Working together to defeat one another."</p><p>Though he was a big believer in compliments to motivate, his contrarian approach also allowed free use of negative feedback. You'd <em>never</em> cut corners with Arnold or, God forbid, not finish. "If he did his 15 reps and you didn't do your 15 reps," recalls Danny Padilla, "it was like, 'Vat's wrong, I got to do your reps now?' What's up with that? If you can't hang, go back to something else!'"</p><h3 class="article-title">Secret 4: </h3><p>They say that nothing motivates like success. This is true, of course, but what about early in your career, when success is elusive? In bodybuilding, there's always someone bigger or stronger, and this applied to Arnold, too. But nobody had goals that were bigger, and nobody clung to them more tightly than him.</p><img src="images/2014/6-secrets-of-arnolds-success-3.jpg" width="560" height="400"/><p>Arnold did his own thing, but he also listened to bodybuilders and mentors close to him. He knew he needed others and he borrowed knowledge from many sources.</p><p>Arnold's goals were no secret. He wrote them at the start of each year on index cards, and made reference to them often. Some, like a new car or a mail-order business, were short-term, recalls Padilla. Four others, which he announced shortly after arriving at Gold's, took longer: He would "become a movie star, make millions of dollars, marry a glamorous wife, and wield political power."</p><p>Easier said than done, of course. But in Arnold's case, <em>they did get done</em>. He was unique in recognizing that the difference between his short-term and long-term ambitions was one of degree, not kind. A goal is a goal; what matters is how you pursue it.</p><h3 class="article-title">Secret 5: </h3><p>Arnold would later scandalize the bodybuilding community by speaking openly of grass and hash, whiskey in his protein shakes, and a host of other taboo topics. Part of why he felt OK doing this was that he'd arrived at the peak of the freaky 1960s, and he saw that Venice Beach was only a small part of Los Angeles, a community where he and his cohorts were often seen as overgrown freaks.</p><img src="images/2014/6-secrets-of-arnolds-success-5.jpg" width="560" height="315"/><p>He never thought of his body as part of him, but rather as a covering over him which he could manipulate. He was an artist and his body was mere clay.</p><p>Even while he was laboring day and night to be the best bodybuilder in the world, he knew how to turn his ego off and look at himself as others saw him. "It's outside of me and also part of me," he said of his body in an interview with "Playboy" in 1977. "I don't say, 'Arnold, how do you look?' but rather 'Let's check out this body in the mirror and see what it looks like today.' Professionally, I have to be detached in order to be critical of it. I don't criticize myself; I criticize my body."</p><p>When he looked in the mirror, Arnold saw what he wanted quickly: "The goal is to carry the weight but keep the proportion and symmetry." In layman's terms: Keep it real.</p><p>To the uninitiated public, proportion and symmetry were what separated the freak from the superhuman. Arnold was always the latter, never the former. And when he set his sights on being an actor, he was more than willing to put his hard-earned mass on the line. For instance, when director Bob Rafelson asked him to drop from 240 to 210, not wanting him to dwarf Sally Field in 1977's "Stay Hungry," Arnold didn't blink.</p><h3 class="article-title">Secret 6: </h3><p>"The weightlifters shone with sweat … powerful looking, Herculean," Arnold wrote of his first visit to a bodybuilding gym, age 15 in his first autobiography, "The Education of a Bodybuilder." " And there it was before me—my life, the answer I'd been seeking." To this day, Arnold says he's a bodybuilder at heart.</p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0671797484/bodybuildingco05" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img src="images/2014/6-secrets-of-arnolds-success-6.jpg" width="204" height="304" border="0" class="right-image c12"/></a><p>As he continued training, however, Arnold found that simply getting big and strong wasn't really his heart's desire. He had to look deeper. "I discovered that the secret of successful workouts," he later wrote, "had to do with competition." He wanted to win, and he wanted to be noticed for it. In short, he wanted to be famous, and the documentary "Pumping Iron" gave him the perfect launching pad.</p><p>The film opened huge, and just as importantly, it opened when Arnold was up for a Golden Globe for his work in "Stay Hungry." "Of course this brought out the competitor in me," Arnold recalls in his autobiography, "Total Recall." He used the documentary's premiere to build his star power as much as possible. He invited members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, whose members select Golden Globe winners, to the premiere and to a star-studded pre-release lunch featuring celebrities like Andy Warhol—the man who had made fame an art form—and Jackie Onassis.</p><p>All of a sudden, everyone seemed to know who Arnold was, and just in time. He won the Golden Globe, and proceeded to leverage his victory into more parts, more fame, and more victories. It was what he had been looking for all along, and once found he'd never lose it.</p><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/arnold-schwarzenegger-series.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/arnold-blueprint_stack_banner-2.jpg" width="560" height="144"/></a><br class="c13"/></div>

Success By Schwarzenegger: 6 Secrets Of Arnold's Success

By the late 1970s, Arnold Schwarzenegger was no longer just the best bodybuilder in Venice Beach or a six-time Mr. Olympia. On the eve of his 15-mile migration to Hollywood, his level of dominance transcended any superlative or official title. “Arnold was the king,” recalls former training partner Danny Padilla. The intensity of Schwarzenegger’s Gold’s […]

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<div id="DPG" webReader="166"><p>As nice as it would be to have unlimited training time, it's simply not in the cards for most people. The gym is great, but a little thing called life often throws a wrench in your best-laid plans. Realistically, even the most dedicated people can only attend the gym 3-5 days per week for an hour per day, and that's with a little luck.</p><p>The good news is that one hour per session is plenty of time, <em>if</em> you use your time wisely! You just have to be smart with your exercise selection and workout program. Enter "power pairings," which are specific superset-style exercise pairs I created to help you get the most out of your precious training time.</p><p>As with any superset, you perform power pairings without resting between the paired exercises. Take a bench press and chin-up pair, for example. You perform one set of bench press followed immediately by a set of chin-ups. You won't rest until after you complete both exercises.</p><h3 class="article-title">Pairing Power</h3><img class="float-right" src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/power-pairings-1.jpg" width="287" height="309" border="0"/><p>"Full-body workouts are my go-to method when life gets hectic."</p><p>Power pairings can be useful within full-body routines or body-part splits, but for this article I'll explain how to use them in full-body routines. Full-body workouts are my go-to method when life gets hectic. In a full-body routine, you'd use a power pairing after your primary lift. This allows you to give your first lift maximum attention and strength.</p><p>Start your workout with a big-bang strength movement and devote your full energy and attention to it. When you finish your main lift, implement a power pairing as your finisher. Power pairings use one piece of equipment and require little to no setup, which makes them easy to use even in crowded gyms.</p><p>Here are four power pairings that you can add to your own training program to cut down on your overall workout time and still get a great training effect!</p><p>
<h4 class="c11">1 Ring Dip And Chin-Up/Hip Thrust Combo</h4>
</p><p>Pair ring dips with a chin-up/hip thrust combination exercise I created to blast the back, glutes, and hamstrings simultaneously. Rather than confusing you by trying to explain the exercise, here's a video of what it looks like in action:</p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/JVkn1pHcB5E" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p>From a strength and muscle-building standpoint, this pairing works well because the exercises focus on different body parts, so they won't negatively impact each other or impair your strength. From a logistical standpoint, it's a great pair because the ring height is the same for each exercise, which means no necessary adjustments between sets.</p><p>To up the ante, try the pairing in a countdown format, as demonstrated in the video. Rather than doing straight sets of each exercise, start by doing decreasing sets of 10, 8, 6, 4, and 2 reps of each exercise with little to no rest between sets. Be warned: This is not for the faint of heart.</p><p>Use it: This pair works as a brutal finisher to cap off a great heavy, knee-dominant exercise like the front squat, back squat, split squat, or lunge.</p><p>
<h4 class="c11">2 "Bottoms Up" Front Squats And Inverted Rows</h4>
</p><p>Instead of starting in the standing position, "bottoms up" squats call for you to start at the bottom of the rep and lift from the squat rack's safety pins. Pause after each rep! This is a great front squat variation to hammer your quads and core, and help you build strength out of the hole.</p><p>After you finish the front squats, leave the bar on the pins and use it to perform a set of inverted rows. The bar will be at a perfect height to allow for full range of motion with no adjustments. It works great from a logistical standpoint.</p><p>In the video below, I use chains on the front squats, which is great if you have chains at your disposal, but they're not essential.</p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/2sgIg3qubEU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p><strong>Use it:</strong> This pairing is an ideal finisher after a heavy bench press or overhead press variation.</p><p>
<h4 class="c11">3 Rack RDL And Split-Stance Row Combo</h4>
</p><p>I recommend doing RDLs and barbell rows from the safety pins of a squat rack. Reset after each rep to take stress off your lower back and encourage proper form. I also recommend doing barbell rows with a split stance to take stress off the lower back, because the split stance helps prevent against lower-back rounding.</p><p>Fortunately, the proper pin height is the same for each exercise, so it works well as a pairing. You'll almost undoubtedly be able to use more weight on RDLs than barbell rows, so you'll need to change the weight, which is a breeze because the bar is raised off the floor. This video below shows how the pair looks in action. I use an oversized trap bar, which is great if you have one, but you can just as easily use a standard barbell.</p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/plwM2jT1FIM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p>If you use a barbell, here is how the rows look.</p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/iOGYG4SKMDo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p><strong>Use it:</strong> This pair goes well after a heavy pressing day.</p><p>
<h4 class="c11">4 Overhead Press And Front Squats</h4>
</p><p>Pairing overhead presses with front squats works well because you don't need to waste time adjusting the bar in the rack. It's set to the same height for each exercise, making this a killer combo.</p><p>I recommend doing the overhead press before the front squats, because after much experimentation, I found that the overhead press doesn't negatively impact the subsequent front squats. Alternatively, if you do the front squats first, the overhead press suffers.</p><p>It's also important to note that most people will be much stronger on front squats than overhead press. This gives you two options: add weight for each set of front squats, or simply do more reps. I usually choose the latter and do twice as many front squats as overhead presses, as I do in this video.</p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/wgpFeuusphc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p><strong>Use it:</strong> This pairing works perfectly as a finisher after doing a heavy chin-up or row variation. It's also ideal as a standalone workout when you're really pinched for time and still want to get a good training effect.</p><h3 class="article-title">Putting It All Together</h3><p>Here's an example of how to utilize these power pairings within a full-body workout program to keep your workouts brief but effective. Shoot to train 2-4 days per week and rotate the workouts as necessary.</p><div class="left-side-stripe" webReader="-5"><p><strong>Workout 1:</strong><br /><strong>A1.</strong> Front Squats: 5 sets of 6 reps<br /><strong>B1.</strong> Ring Dips: 5 sets of 10, 8, 6, 4, and 2 reps<br /><strong>B2.</strong> Chin-Up/Hip Thrust Combo: 5 sets of 10, 8, 6, 4, and 2 reps</p><p><strong>Workout 2:</strong><br /><strong>A1.</strong> Incline Bench Press: 5 sets of 6 reps<br /><strong>B1.</strong> "Bottoms Up" Front Squats: 4 sets of 10 reps<br /><strong>B2.</strong> Inverted Rows: 4 sets of 10 reps</p><p><strong>Workout 3:</strong><br /><strong>A1.</strong> Dumbbell Bench Press: 5 sets of 8 reps<br /><strong>B1.</strong> Rack RDL: 4 sets of 8 reps<br /><strong>B2.</strong> Split-Stance Rack Row: 4 sets of 8 reps</p><p><strong>Workout 4:</strong><br /><strong>A1.</strong> Chin-ups: 5 sets of 6 reps<br /><strong>B1.</strong> Overhead Press: 4 sets of 6 reps<br /><strong>B2.</strong> Front Squats: 4 sets of 12 reps</p></div><br class="c12"/></div><div class="padded-content article-content mod-about-the-author" id="article-about-author" webReader="42.3963133641"><h4 class="article-section-header">About The Author</h4><div class="ata-left-column" webReader="8.50299401198"><div class="ata-author-name"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ben-bruno.html">Ben Bruno</a></div><div class="author-gradient-button"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ben-bruno.html">VIEW AUTHOR PAGE</a></div><p class="ata-author-summary">Ben Bruno graduated Summa Cum Laude from Columbia University. He lives in West Hollywood, California, and trains clients at Rise Movement...</p></div><div class="ata-right-column"><div class="ata-author-image-frame"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ben-bruno.html"><img src="images/2014/writer-ben-bruno-sig-new.jpg" alt=""/></a></div><div class="ata-view-all-articles-link"><ul class="bb-chevron-list bold-type"><li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ben-bruno.html#articles" class="bold-type">View All Articles By This Author</a></li>
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Power Pairings: Effective Supersets For Strength And Size

As nice as it would be to have unlimited training time, it’s simply not in the cards for most people. The gym is great, but a little thing called life often throws a wrench in your best-laid plans. Realistically, even the most dedicated people can only attend the gym 3-5 days per week for an […]

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Fitness 360: Brian Casad Supplement Program

Brian Casad doesn’t use a lot of supplements. And even when he does, it can change from day to day or week to week. He keeps things basic, uses products from multiple companies, and just takes what he feels he needs. The one supp that he does desire is a pre-workout. “You take that pre-workout […]

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Paige Hathaway

20 hours 52 minutes ago

In my story, the princess saved herself ✨
She no longer allowed herself be defined by the struggles in her life. Instead she chose to amplify the things that gave her joy and she looked into the future with such courage it would scare you. She finally learned to stop making other people the authors of her life. That’s when she found her own voice, made her own rules and very much lived her own life. She did not ask permission to make her dreams come true, nor did she wait for others to share her confidence in the path she set for herself because she knew the right people would eventually catch up. Throughout her life she made some questionable choices, many of which led to difficult circumstances but the most important choice she ever made was to give herself a second chance. She wanted something else, something different, something more... and that’s what she became. Now she is the queen of her own castle and everyday is the beginning of a brand new adventure.

Paige Hathaway

1 day 14 hours ago

From me to you.. Good luck in all you do. Whatever you’re up against, don’t show signs of nervousness or fear. Show them the face of someone who has already won. Show them your inner power. Your inner power called self faith. You have to see yourself winning before you win. You have to see yourself already completing your goal. How does this feeling of accomplishment make you feel? Imagine that feeling in your soul. Manifest it in your own reality. Be hungry, find that burning desire in your heart. Don’t just sit at home on your couch.. go out there and conquer your life. Have so much faith in your abilities and in yourself that people around you feel your energy and believe in you too. If you have a heartbeat then you still have time to make your dreams a reality. Happy Monday my lovely people.. Let’s stop telling people about our dreams and just start showing them.

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