Tag Archive | "arnold"

<div id="DPG" webReader="22.0134048257"><h5 class="c7"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-day-41.html">Previous</a> | <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-main.html">Main</a> | <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-day-43.html">Next</a></h5><p>You're a full six weeks into Arnold's Blueprint, and you've definitely earned another day off. Rest up, eat up, and don't exert yourself any more than necessary. You've got only a dozen workouts left!</p><p>Last week we took a gander at Arnold's first commercial, which was nothing more than a tiny cameo in a nondescript early 1970s Chevy spot. While he would never be a well-known commercial actor in the United States, Arnold more than made up for it in Japan, where he unforgettably pitched everything from coffee to Cup-O-Noodles to beer during his Mr. Freeze days in the 1990s. Luckily, the Internet has preserved the results.</p><p>Make sure to watch this entire clip. It only gets better as it continues.</p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/jcfI0gf9oDc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/arnold-schwarzenegger-series/blueprint-to-mass-stack.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/arnold-blueprint_stack_bannerbig-b.jpg" width="560" height="360" class="c8"/></a><h5 class="c7"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-day-41.html">Previous</a> | <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-main.html">Main</a> | <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-day-43.html">Next</a></h5><br class="c9"/></div><div class="padded-content article-content mod-about-the-author" id="article-about-author" webReader="33.1219512195"><h4 class="article-section-header">About The Author</h4><div class="ata-left-column" webReader="4.85087719298"><div class="ata-author-name"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/other.htm">Contributing Writer</a></div><div class="author-gradient-button"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/other.htm">VIEW AUTHOR PAGE</a></div><p class="ata-author-summary">Check out these awesome articles by some of the best writers in the industry.</p></div><div class="ata-right-column"><div class="ata-author-image-frame"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/other.htm"><img src="images/2013/writer-contributing-writers-sig-new.jpg" alt=""/></a></div><div class="ata-view-all-articles-link"><ul class="bb-chevron-list bold-type"><li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/other.htm#articles" class="bold-type">View All Articles By This Author</a></li>
</ul></div></div></div>

Arnold Schwarzenegger Blueprint Trainer Day 42

Previous | Main | Next

You’re a full six weeks into Arnold’s Blueprint, and you’ve definitely earned another day off. Rest up, eat up, and don’t exert yourself any more than necessary. You’ve got only a dozen workouts left!

Last week we took a gander at Arnold’s first commercial, which was nothing more than a tiny cameo in a nondescript early 1970s Chevy spot. While he would never be a well-known commercial actor in the United States, Arnold more than made up for it in Japan, where he unforgettably pitched everything from coffee to Cup-O-Noodles to beer during his Mr. Freeze days in the 1990s. Luckily, the Internet has preserved the results.

Make sure to watch this entire clip. It only gets better as it continues.

Previous | Main | Next


About The Author

Check out these awesome articles by some of the best writers in the industry.

See original:

Arnold Schwarzenegger Blueprint Trainer Day 42

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, NutritionComments Off on Arnold Schwarzenegger Blueprint Trainer Day 42

<div class="article-padding-content" webReader="36.5487171655"><div class="article-author-by-line"><span class="byline">by <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/other.htm">Bodybuilding.com</a></span><span class="article-date">Apr 03, 2014</span></div><div id="DPG" webReader="30.9785322017"><h5 class="c7"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-day-38.html">Previous</a> | <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-main.html">Main</a> | <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-day-40.html">Next</a></h5><p>One of the most famous images of Arnold from the 1970s is of him performing a side chest pose, looking with an uncharacteristically serious, scrutinizing glare at the camera—or at least it seems like he's looking at the camera. Training partner Ed Corney recalled the real origin of the image in an interview with Bodybuilding.com:</p><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/arnold-blueprint_day39_graphics-1.jpg" width="261" height="358" border="0" class="float-right c8"/><p>"When Arnold was doing his side chest, they shot that by cutting a hole in the mirror he was looking at and putting a camera behind that hole. So they got him right on." Corney said. "Arnold would be looking at the mirror as a guide doing his side chest pose and they captured that."</p><p>The bodybuilder gazing at himself in the mirror is a stereotype that other gym-goers love to deride, but Arnold knew the true value of this technique more than anyone. Look again at that image; he isn't gazing at himself out of vanity.</p><p>"For a guy like Arnold, a mirror is a tool for self-criticism," writes Joe Weider in his autobiography "Brothers of Iron." "Looking at himself, a serious bodybuilder isn't admiring. He's looking for trouble. And he sees trouble, every time."</p><p>You've now survived a dozen difficult chest and back days in the Blueprint. Today when you're done, stop for a moment to take stock of progress you've made. Then get back to work.</p><div id="meal-plan-table"><ul webReader="2.7496328928"><li class="c6" webReader="10">
<p><strong>Technique: Stripping Method</strong><br />Immediately after your final working set, take some weight off and lift for another 5-10 reps. Then, with no rest, keep repeating this process. Reduce your weight, lift, reduce again, lift, and continue until you're down to the bar. Once you're down to the bar, lift for 20 reps.</p>
<br /></li>
<li class="rowBgColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-incline-bench-press-medium-grip')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/369/Male/t/369_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Incline Bench Press - Medium Grip" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-incline-bench-press-medium-grip')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/369/Male/t/369_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Incline Bench Press - Medium Grip" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-incline-bench-press-medium-grip')">Incline Barbell Bench Press</a></strong><br />10 sets of 4 reps<br />Use the stripping method on your final set</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-bench-press-medium-grip')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/360/Male/t/360_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Bench Press - Medium Grip" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-bench-press-medium-grip')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/360/Male/t/360_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Bench Press - Medium Grip" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-bench-press-medium-grip')">Flat Barbell Bench Press</a></strong><br />5 sets of 6 reps</span></li>
<li class="c6">
<h6>Superset</h6>
</li>
<li class="rowBgColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('dumbbell-flyes')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/12/Male/t/12_1.jpg" alt="Dumbbell Flyes" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('dumbbell-flyes')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/12/Male/t/12_2.jpg" alt="Dumbbell Flyes" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('dumbbell-flyes')">Dumbbell Flyes</a></strong><br />5 sets of 12 reps</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('cable-crossover')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/132/Male/t/132_1.jpg" alt="Cable Crossover" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('cable-crossover')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/132/Male/t/132_2.jpg" alt="Cable Crossover" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('cable-crossover')">Cable Crossover</a></strong><br />5 sets of 12 reps</span></li>
<li class="rowBgColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('chin-up')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/129/Male/t/129_1.jpg" alt="Chin-Up" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('chin-up')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/129/Male/t/129_2.jpg" alt="Chin-Up" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('chin-up')">Wide-Grip Chin-Up</a></strong><br />50 Total Reps<br />Use weight if needed.</span></li>
<li class="c6">
<h6>Superset</h6>
</li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('bent-over-two-dumbbell-row')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/16/Male/t/16_1.jpg" alt="Bent Over Two-Dumbbell Row" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('bent-over-two-dumbbell-row')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/16/Male/t/16_2.jpg" alt="Bent Over Two-Dumbbell Row" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('bent-over-two-dumbbell-row')">Bent-Over Dumbbell Rows</a></strong><br />8 sets of 8 reps</span></li>
<li class="rowBgColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('bent-over-two-arm-long-bar-row')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/18/Male/t/18_1.jpg" alt="Bent Over Two-Arm Long Bar Row" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('bent-over-two-arm-long-bar-row')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/18/Male/t/18_2.jpg" alt="Bent Over Two-Arm Long Bar Row" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('bent-over-two-arm-long-bar-row')">T-Bar Row</a></strong><br />8 sets of 8 reps</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('hanging-leg-raise')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/222/Male/t/222_1.jpg" alt="Hanging Leg Raise" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('hanging-leg-raise')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/222/Male/t/222_2.jpg" alt="Hanging Leg Raise" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('hanging-leg-raise')">Hanging Leg Raise</a></strong><br />5 sets of 25 reps</span></li>
</ul></div><br /><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/arnold-schwarzenegger-series/blueprint-to-mass-stack.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/arnold-blueprint_stack_bannerbig-b.jpg" width="560" height="360" class="c10"/></a><h5 class="c7"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-day-38.html">Previous</a> | <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-main.html">Main</a> | <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-day-40.html">Next</a></h5><br class="c11"/></div><div class="padded-content article-content mod-article-related-articles" id="article-related-articles"><h4 class="article-section-header">Related Articles</h4><div class="gray-gradient-box-with-border no-top-border"><ul class="related-article-list"><li class="first-related-article"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/targeted-ab-training-top-5-moves-for-your-core.html">Targeted Ab Training: Top 5 Moves For Your Core</a></li>
<li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/evolution-of-flex-episode-1-arnold-classic-prep-back-workout.html">Evolution Of Flex, Episode 1: Arnold Classic Preparations And Back Workout</a></li>
<li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-main.html">Arnold Schwarzenegger Blueprint Trainer: Main Page</a></li>
</ul></div><div class="article-related-view-all"><ul class="bb-chevron-list bold-type"><li><a class="bold-type" href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bbinfo.php?page=WorkoutPrograms">View All Workout Programs Articles</a></li>
</ul></div></div><div class="padded-content article-content mod-about-the-author" id="article-about-author" webReader="33.1219512195"><h4 class="article-section-header">About The Author</h4><div class="ata-left-column" webReader="4.85087719298"><div class="ata-author-name"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/other.htm">Contributing Writer</a></div><div class="author-gradient-button"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/other.htm">VIEW AUTHOR PAGE</a></div><p class="ata-author-summary">Check out these awesome articles by some of the best writers in the industry.</p></div><div class="ata-right-column"><div class="ata-author-image-frame"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/other.htm"><img src="images/2013/writer-contributing-writers-sig-new.jpg" alt=""/></a></div><div class="ata-view-all-articles-link"><ul class="bb-chevron-list bold-type"><li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/other.htm#articles" class="bold-type">View All Articles By This Author</a></li>
</ul></div></div></div><div class="padded-content article-content"><span id="id1" class="c12"></span><p>RATE THIS ARTICLE</p><div class="select-rating-container gradient-panel content"><div class="rating-left"><span class="rating-text left clear-both">POOR</span><ul class="select-rating"><li id="id2" onclick="var wcall=wicketAjaxGet('../fun/defaultw.htm?wicket:interface=html:1:ratingsPanel:rate-li:0::IBehaviorListener:0:1',function() { }.bind(this),function() { }.bind(this), function() {return Wicket.$('id2') != null;}.bind(this));" class=" first">1</li>
<li id="id3" onclick="var wcall=wicketAjaxGet('../fun/defaultw.htm?wicket:interface=html:1:ratingsPanel:rate-li:1::IBehaviorListener:0:1',function() { }.bind(this),function() { }.bind(this), function() {return Wicket.$('id3') != null;}.bind(this));">2</li>
<li id="id4" onclick="var wcall=wicketAjaxGet('../fun/defaultw.htm?wicket:interface=html:1:ratingsPanel:rate-li:2::IBehaviorListener:0:1',function() { }.bind(this),function() { }.bind(this), function() {return Wicket.$('id4') != null;}.bind(this));">3</li>
<li id="id5" onclick="var wcall=wicketAjaxGet('../fun/defaultw.htm?wicket:interface=html:1:ratingsPanel:rate-li:3::IBehaviorListener:0:1',function() { }.bind(this),function() { }.bind(this), function() {return Wicket.$('id5') != null;}.bind(this));">4</li>
<li id="id6" onclick="var wcall=wicketAjaxGet('../fun/defaultw.htm?wicket:interface=html:1:ratingsPanel:rate-li:4::IBehaviorListener:0:1',function() { }.bind(this),function() { }.bind(this), function() {return Wicket.$('id6') != null;}.bind(this));">5</li>
<li id="id7" onclick="var wcall=wicketAjaxGet('../fun/defaultw.htm?wicket:interface=html:1:ratingsPanel:rate-li:5::IBehaviorListener:0:1',function() { }.bind(this),function() { }.bind(this), function() {return Wicket.$('id7') != null;}.bind(this));">6</li>
<li id="id8" onclick="var wcall=wicketAjaxGet('../fun/defaultw.htm?wicket:interface=html:1:ratingsPanel:rate-li:6::IBehaviorListener:0:1',function() { }.bind(this),function() { }.bind(this), function() {return Wicket.$('id8') != null;}.bind(this));">7</li>
<li id="id9" onclick="var wcall=wicketAjaxGet('../fun/defaultw.htm?wicket:interface=html:1:ratingsPanel:rate-li:7::IBehaviorListener:0:1',function() { }.bind(this),function() { }.bind(this), function() {return Wicket.$('id9') != null;}.bind(this));">8</li>
<li id="ida" onclick="var wcall=wicketAjaxGet('../fun/defaultw.htm?wicket:interface=html:1:ratingsPanel:rate-li:8::IBehaviorListener:0:1',function() { }.bind(this),function() { }.bind(this), function() {return Wicket.$('ida') != null;}.bind(this));">9</li>
<li id="idb" onclick="var wcall=wicketAjaxGet('../fun/defaultw.htm?wicket:interface=html:1:ratingsPanel:rate-li:9::IBehaviorListener:0:1',function() { }.bind(this),function() { }.bind(this), function() {return Wicket.$('idb') != null;}.bind(this));" class=" last">10</li>
</ul><span class="rating-text right">EXCELLENT</span></div><div class="rating-synopsis product-rating"><span>OVERALL RATING</span><div><p>N/A</p><p><span class="rating-scale">Out of 10</span><br /><span class="green" id="idd"></span><br /><span class="num-ratings"><span class="num-ratings" id="ide">0</span> Ratings</span></p></div></div></div></div><div id="id10" class="c13"></div><div><div class="inline-message success c14"><div class="message-icon message-text"><h3>SUCCESS:</h3><ul><li>Your comment has been posted! Because comments are displayed from oldest to newest, it will appear on the last page.</li>
</ul></div></div><div class="inline-message error-box c14"><div class="message-icon message-text"><h3>ERROR:</h3><ul><li>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Integer mattis varius nisi eu aliquet. <a href="#">Integer mattis</a>.</li>
<li>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</li>
</ul></div></div><div class="gradient-panel content results-bottom"><span class="results-field"><strong>Showing 0 - </strong> of <strong><span class="total-count-label">Comments</span></strong></span></div><div class="articles-commets"><div id="id13" class="c13"></div><div><div id="id15"><ul class="follow-email"><li>Follow This Discussion by:</li>
<li><a href="#" id="id16" onclick="var wcall=wicketAjaxGet('../fun/defaultw.htm?wicket:interface=html:1:commentsPanel:comments:follow-info:link-follow-email::IBehaviorListener:0:1',function() { }.bind(this),function() { }.bind(this), function() {return Wicket.$('id16') != null;}.bind(this));return !wcall;">Email</a></li>
</ul></div><div class="feed-comment-box user-feed-comment main-comment-box"><input id="entity-hash" type="hidden" value="NTJmYWNjMzEwY2YyNzdiOTk0YjJhM2ZiOjoxMzk2NTczMzUxNzg2Ojo0MQ==" name="commentsPanel:comments:comment-box-panel:entity-hash"/><ul class="share-info"><li>
<p>comment on this article</p>
</li>
<li class="login"><a href="#" id="id17" onclick="var wcall=wicketAjaxGet('../fun/defaultw.htm?wicket:interface=html:1:commentsPanel:comments:comment-box-panel:login-panel::IBehaviorListener:0:1',function() { }.bind(this),function() { }.bind(this), function() {return Wicket.$('id17') != null;}.bind(this));return !wcall;">Log In</a> to Comment</li>
</ul><textarea data-watermark="Add a comment" class="autosize" max-length="2500" name="commentsPanel:comments:comment-box-panel:post-comment-area" id="id18" onclick="var wcall=wicketAjaxGet('../fun/defaultw.htm?wicket:interface=html:1:commentsPanel:comments:comment-box-panel:post-comment-area::IBehaviorListener:0:1',function() { }.bind(this),function() { }.bind(this), function() {return Wicket.$('id18') != null;}.bind(this));"></textarea><p class="disc">(5 characters minimum)</p><ul><li><a class="post" id="id19" href="#dummyanchor" onclick="var wcall=wicketAjaxGet('../fun/defaultw.htm?wicket:interface=html:1:commentsPanel:comments:comment-box-panel:post-comment-link::IBehaviorListener:0:1',function() { }.bind(this),function() { }.bind(this), function() {return Wicket.$('id19') != null;}.bind(this));return !wcall;"></a></li>
<li>
<ul><li><input type="checkbox"/></li>
<li><span>notify me when users reply to my comment</span></li>
</ul></li>
</ul><div id="id1a" class="c13"></div></div></div></div><div id="id1c" class="c13"></div><div class="gradient-panel content results-bottom"><span class="results-field"><strong>Showing 0 - </strong> of <strong><span class="total-count-label">Comments</span></strong></span></div></div><div class="padded-content article-content mod-article-featured-product" id="article-featured-product"><h4 class="article-section-header">Featured Product</h4><ul class="article-featured-product" webReader="15.5539568345"><li class="article-featured-product-image">
<table><tbody><tr><td><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/arnold-schwarzenegger-series/iron-pump.html"><img src="http://store.bbcomcdn.com/images/store/prodimage/prod_prod1620048/image_prodprod1620048_largeImage_X_130_black.jpg" alt="Iron Pump" title="Iron Pump"/></a></td>
</tr></tbody></table></li>
<li class="article-featured-product-details" webReader="16.5467625899">
<h3><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/arnold-schwarzenegger-series/iron-pump.html">Arnold Schwarzenegger Series Iron Pump</a></h3>
<p>Arnold Schwarzenegger Series Iron Pump With Ion-3 Nitrate Technology: The World's First Molecularly Modified Arginine Formula! Get the Lowest Prices on Iron Pump at Bodybuilding.com!</p>
<ul class="bb-chevron-list bold-type"><li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/arnold-schwarzenegger-series/iron-pump.html" class="bold-type">Learn More about Arnold Schwarzenegger Series Iron Pump!</a></li>
</ul></li>
</ul></div></div>

Arnold Schwarzenegger Blueprint Trainer Day 39

Previous | Main | Next

One of the most famous images of Arnold from the 1970s is of him performing a side chest pose, looking with an uncharacteristically serious, scrutinizing glare at the camera—or at least it seems like he’s looking at the camera. Training partner Ed Corney recalled the real origin of the image in an interview with Bodybuilding.com:

“When Arnold was doing his side chest, they shot that by cutting a hole in the mirror he was looking at and putting a camera behind that hole. So they got him right on.” Corney said. “Arnold would be looking at the mirror as a guide doing his side chest pose and they captured that.”

The bodybuilder gazing at himself in the mirror is a stereotype that other gym-goers love to deride, but Arnold knew the true value of this technique more than anyone. Look again at that image; he isn’t gazing at himself out of vanity.

“For a guy like Arnold, a mirror is a tool for self-criticism,” writes Joe Weider in his autobiography “Brothers of Iron.” “Looking at himself, a serious bodybuilder isn’t admiring. He’s looking for trouble. And he sees trouble, every time.”

You’ve now survived a dozen difficult chest and back days in the Blueprint. Today when you’re done, stop for a moment to take stock of progress you’ve made. Then get back to work.

Previous | Main | Next


Related Articles

About The Author

Check out these awesome articles by some of the best writers in the industry.

RATE THIS ARTICLE

POOR

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10

EXCELLENT

OVERALL RATING

N/A

Out of 10

0 Ratings

SUCCESS:

  • Your comment has been posted! Because comments are displayed from oldest to newest, it will appear on the last page.

ERROR:

  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Integer mattis varius nisi eu aliquet. Integer mattis.
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet
Showing 0 – of Comments

(5 characters minimum)

    • notify me when users reply to my comment
Showing 0 – of Comments

Featured Product

Link – 

Arnold Schwarzenegger Blueprint Trainer Day 39

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, NutritionComments Off on Arnold Schwarzenegger Blueprint Trainer Day 39

<div id="DPG" webReader="239.651478576"><p>Half a lifetime before the bros of "Jersey Shore" began preaching "GTL"—that is, "gym, tan, laundry"—as the signs of a day well-spent, Arnold Schwarzenegger and his Gold's Gym brethren were using similar principles to take the sport of bodybuilding by storm.</p><p>Joe Weider was famously fond of calling bodybuilders "lazy bastards" during these years. But, make no mistake: Arnold's daily ritual wasn't some walk on the beach. It took hard work, incredible discipline, and it just happened to be exactly what he loved to do.</p><p>In late 2012, Arnold took Bodybuilding.com on a tour of his old stomping grounds and gave us an idea of how he structured the perfect day to build the perfect body.</p><p><embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" src="http://videos.bodybuilding.com/nuevo/player/nvplayer.swf?config=http://videos.bodybuilding.com/nuevo/econfig.php?key=9fc6e74d7ca2e1f20526" width="560" height="357" id="nuevoplayer" name="nuevoplayer" bgcolor="#FFFFFF" quality="high" allowscriptaccess="always" wmode="transparent" allowfullscreen="true" flashvars="image=http://videos.bodybuilding.com/preview/112000/2_112622.jpg"/></p><h3 class="article-title">Early Wake-up: </h3><p>For most young men, simply having a regimented approach to work, training, and nutrition is a tall enough order. But, doing the dishes and making the bed? Who's got time for that—especially in the morning? Arnold did. In 1969, he and his new roommate Franco Columbu embraced the project of putting their whole lives in order, starting with their bachelor pad.</p><p>"Our place was immaculate," Arnold writes in his autobiography "Total Recall." "We vacuumed regularly; the dishes were always done, with nothing piling up; and the bed was always made, military-style. We were both into the discipline of getting up in the morning and straightening up before you leave the house. The more you do it, the more automatic it becomes, and the less effort it takes. Our apartment was always way cleaner than anyone else's I went to, men or women."</p><p>It's easy to chalk up this attention to detail as the idiosyncrasies of a fastidious military-trained Austrian, but for Arnold, it was part and parcel of his training. He has always insisted that one of the great virtues of bodybuilding is that "it is a good way of introducing more discipline and control in the rest of your life."</p><h3 class="article-title">7 AM: </h3><p>When preparing for a contest or undertaking an intense training cycle like the type in Bodybuilding.com's <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-main.html" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Arnold Blueprint program</a>, Arnold often split his training into two daily sessions. The first almost always took place at an early hour when Gold's Gym was inhabited by a far less famous clientele.</p><p>"When Franco [Columbu] and I got to the gym at 7 a.m. we would frequently see lawyers, accountants, teachers, and others with a full work schedule just finishing their training and hitting the showers before going to their jobs," Arnold wrote in "The Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding." "This showed a lot of dedication on their part, but it's this kind of dedication that yields the best results."</p><img src="images/2014/a-day-in-arnolds-life_graphics-1.jpg" width="560" height="501" border="0"/><p>"In the minds of many gym regulars, Gold's wasn't officially open for business until Arnold arrived."</p><p>The discipline these early mornings enforced was only one benefit. Another, Arnold has said, is that his best workouts almost always seemed to take place in the morning. His enthusiasm was infectious, too. In the minds of many gym regulars, Gold's wasn't officially open for business until Arnold arrived.</p><p>"When he got there, the place lit up. Now it was time to train," said Ed Corney, one of Arnold's training partners, in an interview with Bodybuilding.com in 2007. "He brought that with him. You're upstairs changing into your clothes, and you can't wait to get out there and right into the mainstream of top training."</p><h3 class="article-title">After Sunrise: </h3><p>Indoor tanning has been around in various forms since the early 20th century; lying on the beach getting cooked liked bacon has been around far longer. But neither option cut it for Arnold, for the simple reason that they were a recipe for what he told us was "a tan that sucked."</p><p>"Sometimes when [people] lie in the sun, they look like they got tanned in the front and tanned in the back, but they're not tanned around down beneath the arms and everywhere," Arnold told us on tour. The answer to building a competition-worthy tan was to stroll the approximately half a mile from Gold's Gym down Ocean Front Walk to Venice's famed Muscle Beach and train outdoors.</p><img src="images/2014/a-day-in-arnolds-life_graphics-2.jpg" width="560" height="337" border="0"/><p>"'The advantage was that when you did your chin-ups, your presses, your curls, you got the tan everywhere. Then we would run over to the ocean, jump in the waves, get the salt water all over, and again, get tan all around.'"</p><p>"It was a little smaller in the days when I worked out," Arnold said of Muscle Beach, "but the advantage was that when you did your chin-ups, your presses, your curls, you got the tan everywhere. Then we would run over to the ocean, jump in the waves, get the salt water all over, and again, get tan all around."</p><h3 class="article-title">Lunch: </h3><img src="images/2014/a-day-in-arnolds-life_graphics-3b.jpg" width="243" height="179" border="0" class="float-right c12"/><p>Before moving to California, Arnold has said, his approach to nutrition was simply eat big, get big. But once he realized that sheer bulk wasn't going to be enough to take the step from Mr. Universe to Mr. Olympia, he and Franco became devoted students of diet and nutrition, ingesting multiple small protein-rich meals throughout the day. "Three meals a day is good," he wrote in "The Encyclopedia," "[but] four meals a day is better."</p><p>But don't take this to mean they forgot how to eat for satisfaction. Franco recalled in his book "The Bodybuilder's Nutrition Book" that the pair always saved extra room for the meal that followed a hard training session. "After leaving the gym, we ate a great lunch with complete enjoyment, knowing that vitamins and minerals are helpful only when the body is stimulated by hard training," he writes.</p><p>Arnold gave an even more vivid description in "Total Recall" of the pair's visit to the local "smorgasbord" buffets: "The bodybuilder would start with five, six, or seven eggs, after which we go to the next station and eat all the tomatoes and vegetables. Then we would have the steak, and then the fish. Muscle magazines in those days were always warning you that you had to have your amino acids, and that you had to be careful because the amino acids in certain foods weren't complete. 'Hey,' we said, 'let's not even think about it; let's just eat all the proteins. We have egg, the fish, the beef, the turkey, the cheese—let's have it all!'"</p><h3 class="article-title">During the Day: </h3><p>Arnold was never just a bodybuilder. His professional ambitions were always larger, and as soon as he was established in California, he established a string of moneymaking endeavors. As his English improved, he gave seminars at Gold's and other gyms. He began publishing mail-order booklets on training and posing, initially filling all the orders himself.</p><p>"I loved being an American entrepreneur," he writes in "Total Recall." "I was super efficient. I took the doors off my bedroom closet to make an alcove and had a friend build shelves and a little fold-down desk. Each booklet had its own numbered niche, and there were bins for incoming mail, checks, envelopes, and outgoing orders." Many of his peers started similar businesses, but saw them flounder or spark legal issues when they couldn't follow through with Arnold's level of dedication.</p><img src="images/2014/a-day-in-arnolds-life_graphics-4.jpg" width="560" height="346" border="0"/><p>"'I loved being an American entrepreneur.'"</p><p>He and Franco also famously started their own construction enterprise, billing themselves in local ads as "European bricklayers. Experts in marble and stone." Some of the walls they and their crew of bodybuilders built still stand, as he showed our film crew. The pair learned as they went and kept their business afloat. When a significant earthquake cracked walls and chimneys around the valley, it gave them all the work they could handle.</p><p>With their extra earnings, Arnold and Franco began investing in real estate with great success. By the mid-70s, they were said to be the world's only two full-time professional bodybuilders, but the label does little to capture the work and risk-taking that allowed them to focus on their real passion.</p><h3 class="article-title">Evening: </h3><p>With the day's work done, it was time to head back to Gold's for the second half of Arnold's customary twice-daily split. Sometimes this just meant abs and calves, and sometimes, it was those plus additional arm and hamstring detail work. But occasionally, as when he was training for the 1975 Mr. Olympia featured in the film "Pumping Iron," the afternoon workout was a total assault on the big muscles just like the morning workout had been.</p><p>His increasing fondness for brutal evening work, Arnold told us, was part of why he switched training partners that year. "Franco would just do his 5 sets of squats and 5 sets of leg extensions, and he would just walk out because he had naturally big thighs, but I had to do my 25 sets," Arnold explained. "Franco would leave three-quarters of the way through the workout. Sometimes in the evening, he wouldn't come. So I said to myself, well, I've got to go, since I've only got 8 or 9 weeks left to and to train for the Olympia, I've got to get someone who's as hungry as I am. And that was why I switched over during that period to Ed Corney."</p><img src="images/2014/a-day-in-arnolds-life_graphics-5.jpg" width="560" height="340" border="0"/><p>"'Franco would do his 5 sets of squats and 5 sets of leg extensions, and he would just walk out because he had naturally big thighs, but I had to do my 25 sets.'"</p><p>Arnold's dedication to his daily grind paid off that year in his sixth Mr. Olympia title, allowing him to retire—albeit temporarily—from the sport at the top of his game. The following year, Franco would leap to fill the void left by Arnold and capture his first overall Mr. Olympia title.</p><p>What does your perfect bodybuilding day look like? How do you find the time to balance hard training with professional and personal obligations? Let us know in the comments!</p><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/arnold-schwarzenegger-series/blueprint-to-mass-stack.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/arnold-blueprint_stack_bannerbig-b.jpg" width="560" height="360" class="c13"/></a><br class="c14"/><h3 class="article-title">Recommended For You</h3><div class="c17" webReader="5.0261627907"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-mass-training.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/arnold-blueprint_training_play_overview_sm.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c16" webReader="6.18604651163"><h4 class="c15"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-mass-training.html">ARNOLD's BLUEPRINT: MASS TRAINING VIDEO</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Watch this video to learn some of Arnold's favorite exercises and preferred training techniques. Get the knowledge you need to grow!</p></div></div><div class="c17" webReader="5.10126582278"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-mass-nutrition.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/arnold-blueprint_nutrition_overview_smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c16" webReader="6.27848101266"><h4 class="c15"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-mass-nutrition.html">ARNOLD'S BLUEPRINT: MASS NUTRITION</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Quality mass comes from quality calories. Learn more about how Arnold ate and follow his nutrition blueprint for more mass!</p></div></div><div class="c17" webReader="5.0635359116"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-mass-supplementation.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/arnold-blueprint_supplementation_overview_smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c16" webReader="6.2320441989"><h4 class="c15"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-mass-supplementation.html">ARNOLD'S BLUEPRINT: MASS SUPPLEMENTATION</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Look under the hood of Arnold Schwarzenegger's signature supplement line! Learn about the products Arnold recommends for incredible results.</p></div></div></div>

A Day In Arnold's Life: The Perfect Routine To Build The Perfect Body

Half a lifetime before the bros of “Jersey Shore” began preaching “GTL”—that is, “gym, tan, laundry”—as the signs of a day well-spent, Arnold Schwarzenegger and his Gold’s Gym brethren were using similar principles to take the sport of bodybuilding by storm.

Joe Weider was famously fond of calling bodybuilders “lazy bastards” during these years. But, make no mistake: Arnold’s daily ritual wasn’t some walk on the beach. It took hard work, incredible discipline, and it just happened to be exactly what he loved to do.

In late 2012, Arnold took Bodybuilding.com on a tour of his old stomping grounds and gave us an idea of how he structured the perfect day to build the perfect body.

Early Wake-up:

For most young men, simply having a regimented approach to work, training, and nutrition is a tall enough order. But, doing the dishes and making the bed? Who’s got time for that—especially in the morning? Arnold did. In 1969, he and his new roommate Franco Columbu embraced the project of putting their whole lives in order, starting with their bachelor pad.

“Our place was immaculate,” Arnold writes in his autobiography “Total Recall.” “We vacuumed regularly; the dishes were always done, with nothing piling up; and the bed was always made, military-style. We were both into the discipline of getting up in the morning and straightening up before you leave the house. The more you do it, the more automatic it becomes, and the less effort it takes. Our apartment was always way cleaner than anyone else’s I went to, men or women.”

It’s easy to chalk up this attention to detail as the idiosyncrasies of a fastidious military-trained Austrian, but for Arnold, it was part and parcel of his training. He has always insisted that one of the great virtues of bodybuilding is that “it is a good way of introducing more discipline and control in the rest of your life.”

7 AM:

When preparing for a contest or undertaking an intense training cycle like the type in Bodybuilding.com’s Arnold Blueprint program, Arnold often split his training into two daily sessions. The first almost always took place at an early hour when Gold’s Gym was inhabited by a far less famous clientele.

“When Franco [Columbu] and I got to the gym at 7 a.m. we would frequently see lawyers, accountants, teachers, and others with a full work schedule just finishing their training and hitting the showers before going to their jobs,” Arnold wrote in “The Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding.” “This showed a lot of dedication on their part, but it’s this kind of dedication that yields the best results.”

“In the minds of many gym regulars, Gold’s wasn’t officially open for business until Arnold arrived.”

The discipline these early mornings enforced was only one benefit. Another, Arnold has said, is that his best workouts almost always seemed to take place in the morning. His enthusiasm was infectious, too. In the minds of many gym regulars, Gold’s wasn’t officially open for business until Arnold arrived.

“When he got there, the place lit up. Now it was time to train,” said Ed Corney, one of Arnold’s training partners, in an interview with Bodybuilding.com in 2007. “He brought that with him. You’re upstairs changing into your clothes, and you can’t wait to get out there and right into the mainstream of top training.”

After Sunrise:

Indoor tanning has been around in various forms since the early 20th century; lying on the beach getting cooked liked bacon has been around far longer. But neither option cut it for Arnold, for the simple reason that they were a recipe for what he told us was “a tan that sucked.”

“Sometimes when [people] lie in the sun, they look like they got tanned in the front and tanned in the back, but they’re not tanned around down beneath the arms and everywhere,” Arnold told us on tour. The answer to building a competition-worthy tan was to stroll the approximately half a mile from Gold’s Gym down Ocean Front Walk to Venice’s famed Muscle Beach and train outdoors.

“‘The advantage was that when you did your chin-ups, your presses, your curls, you got the tan everywhere. Then we would run over to the ocean, jump in the waves, get the salt water all over, and again, get tan all around.'”

“It was a little smaller in the days when I worked out,” Arnold said of Muscle Beach, “but the advantage was that when you did your chin-ups, your presses, your curls, you got the tan everywhere. Then we would run over to the ocean, jump in the waves, get the salt water all over, and again, get tan all around.”

Lunch:

Before moving to California, Arnold has said, his approach to nutrition was simply eat big, get big. But once he realized that sheer bulk wasn’t going to be enough to take the step from Mr. Universe to Mr. Olympia, he and Franco became devoted students of diet and nutrition, ingesting multiple small protein-rich meals throughout the day. “Three meals a day is good,” he wrote in “The Encyclopedia,” “[but] four meals a day is better.”

But don’t take this to mean they forgot how to eat for satisfaction. Franco recalled in his book “The Bodybuilder’s Nutrition Book” that the pair always saved extra room for the meal that followed a hard training session. “After leaving the gym, we ate a great lunch with complete enjoyment, knowing that vitamins and minerals are helpful only when the body is stimulated by hard training,” he writes.

Arnold gave an even more vivid description in “Total Recall” of the pair’s visit to the local “smorgasbord” buffets: “The bodybuilder would start with five, six, or seven eggs, after which we go to the next station and eat all the tomatoes and vegetables. Then we would have the steak, and then the fish. Muscle magazines in those days were always warning you that you had to have your amino acids, and that you had to be careful because the amino acids in certain foods weren’t complete. ‘Hey,’ we said, ‘let’s not even think about it; let’s just eat all the proteins. We have egg, the fish, the beef, the turkey, the cheese—let’s have it all!'”

During the Day:

Arnold was never just a bodybuilder. His professional ambitions were always larger, and as soon as he was established in California, he established a string of moneymaking endeavors. As his English improved, he gave seminars at Gold’s and other gyms. He began publishing mail-order booklets on training and posing, initially filling all the orders himself.

“I loved being an American entrepreneur,” he writes in “Total Recall.” “I was super efficient. I took the doors off my bedroom closet to make an alcove and had a friend build shelves and a little fold-down desk. Each booklet had its own numbered niche, and there were bins for incoming mail, checks, envelopes, and outgoing orders.” Many of his peers started similar businesses, but saw them flounder or spark legal issues when they couldn’t follow through with Arnold’s level of dedication.

“‘I loved being an American entrepreneur.'”

He and Franco also famously started their own construction enterprise, billing themselves in local ads as “European bricklayers. Experts in marble and stone.” Some of the walls they and their crew of bodybuilders built still stand, as he showed our film crew. The pair learned as they went and kept their business afloat. When a significant earthquake cracked walls and chimneys around the valley, it gave them all the work they could handle.

With their extra earnings, Arnold and Franco began investing in real estate with great success. By the mid-70s, they were said to be the world’s only two full-time professional bodybuilders, but the label does little to capture the work and risk-taking that allowed them to focus on their real passion.

Evening:

With the day’s work done, it was time to head back to Gold’s for the second half of Arnold’s customary twice-daily split. Sometimes this just meant abs and calves, and sometimes, it was those plus additional arm and hamstring detail work. But occasionally, as when he was training for the 1975 Mr. Olympia featured in the film “Pumping Iron,” the afternoon workout was a total assault on the big muscles just like the morning workout had been.

His increasing fondness for brutal evening work, Arnold told us, was part of why he switched training partners that year. “Franco would just do his 5 sets of squats and 5 sets of leg extensions, and he would just walk out because he had naturally big thighs, but I had to do my 25 sets,” Arnold explained. “Franco would leave three-quarters of the way through the workout. Sometimes in the evening, he wouldn’t come. So I said to myself, well, I’ve got to go, since I’ve only got 8 or 9 weeks left to and to train for the Olympia, I’ve got to get someone who’s as hungry as I am. And that was why I switched over during that period to Ed Corney.”

“‘Franco would do his 5 sets of squats and 5 sets of leg extensions, and he would just walk out because he had naturally big thighs, but I had to do my 25 sets.'”

Arnold’s dedication to his daily grind paid off that year in his sixth Mr. Olympia title, allowing him to retire—albeit temporarily—from the sport at the top of his game. The following year, Franco would leap to fill the void left by Arnold and capture his first overall Mr. Olympia title.

What does your perfect bodybuilding day look like? How do you find the time to balance hard training with professional and personal obligations? Let us know in the comments!


Recommended For You

ARNOLD’s BLUEPRINT: MASS TRAINING VIDEO

Watch this video to learn some of Arnold’s favorite exercises and preferred training techniques. Get the knowledge you need to grow!

ARNOLD’S BLUEPRINT: MASS NUTRITION

Quality mass comes from quality calories. Learn more about how Arnold ate and follow his nutrition blueprint for more mass!

ARNOLD’S BLUEPRINT: MASS SUPPLEMENTATION

Look under the hood of Arnold Schwarzenegger’s signature supplement line! Learn about the products Arnold recommends for incredible results.

Credit – 

A Day In Arnold's Life: The Perfect Routine To Build The Perfect Body

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, NutritionComments Off on A Day In Arnold's Life: The Perfect Routine To Build The Perfect Body

Thumbnail

Arnold Schwarzenegger Blueprint Trainer Day 15

Previous | Main | Next

In addition to being the most accomplished bodybuilder of his time, Arnold was easily the most photographed. Much of this was onstage, of course, but those iconic black-and-white training images from the 1970s that filled the books “Pumping Iron,” “The Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding” and countless magazines afterward are just as timeless. Look at Arnold, Dave Draper, and Franco in Gold’s Gym, and you can practically hear the grunts and clanking iron. Maybe one of these images was in your locker or training journal; maybe one still is.

Venice Beach was a perfect locale for Arnold to express his mighty physique. Look at that biceps peak!

The greatest bodybuilder of all time unabashedly filled his life with images of motivating physiques when he was on his way up—and even after he had a pair of Mr. Universe titles to his name. He recounts in his most recent autobiography, “Total Recall” that when he was coming over to the U.S., he meditated on them regularly. “Being the best would really come down to beating champions like the guys whose pictures I had hanging all over the walls of my room: Reg Park, Dave Draper, Frank Zane, Bill Pearl, Larry Scott, Chuck Sipes, Serge Nubret,” he writes. “They had inspired me, and I said to myself, ‘These are the kinds of people I have to go through eventually.’ My victories had put me in their league, but I was the newcomer with a lot left to prove.”

You’ve got a lot left to prove in the remaining six weeks of this trainer, too. This week, find a classic photo of the Oak and put it someplace you know you’ll see it—the lock screen of your phone, maybe, or somewhere in your house. Don’t be self-conscious. Imagine yourself training alongside him, and let him push you like he pushed everyone who came in contact with him.

Previous | Main | Next


Related Articles

About The Author

Check out these awesome articles by some of the best writers in the industry.

RATE THIS ARTICLE

POOR

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10

EXCELLENT

OVERALL RATING

N/A

Out of 10

1 Ratings

SUCCESS:

  • Your comment has been posted! Because comments are displayed from oldest to newest, it will appear on the last page.

ERROR:

  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Integer mattis varius nisi eu aliquet. Integer mattis.
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet
Showing 1 – of Comments

(5 characters minimum)

    • notify me when users reply to my comment
Showing 1 – of Comments

Featured Product

More: 

Arnold Schwarzenegger Blueprint Trainer Day 15

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, NutritionComments Off on Arnold Schwarzenegger Blueprint Trainer Day 15

<div id="DPG" webReader="297.504723097"><p>By the late 1970s, Arnold Schwarzenegger was no longer just the best bodybuilder in Venice Beach or a six-time Mr. Olympia. On the eve of his 15-mile migration to Hollywood, his level of dominance transcended any superlative or official title. "Arnold was the king," recalls former training partner Danny Padilla.</p><p>The intensity of Schwarzenegger's Gold's Gym workouts, while legendary, couldn't explain it all, or what came afterward. Surely, the Styrian Oak had found some taproot to future success. Ask Arnold himself, as many did, have, and will continue to do, and you'd be likely to get an unsatisfying and straightforward reply. "If there were any secrets, I would have found them by now," he said at the time. His answer was that there was no substitute for hard work.</p><p>Then, against all odds, Arnold became king twice again: First, of the action blockbuster film genre, and then the chief executive of the Great State of California. None of us could say we saw these other victories coming, but when they did, it all seemed to make sense somehow. Three very different crowns, but all three were built on fundamental strengths of this unique giant's mindset.</p><p>Here are six surefire strategies for success that Arnold forged in the crucible of Gold's Gym, and made work for him in every other part of his life.</p><h3 class="article-title">Secret 1: </h3><p>Arnold always stressed the need for rest between sets. But over time, following the advice of trainer Joe Weider, he began devoting an increasing percentage of his rests to what Weider called the "Isotension Principle." You might know it by another name: flexing.</p><p>Here's how it works in its simplest form: After a final set, continue hitting the targeted muscle by flexing to peak contraction for 3-6 seconds. The action maintains connections of myofibrils, the building blocks of muscle, without resistance. The longer and more repeated the flex, the greater those connections, and over time, the greater the tension your muscle fibers will generate.</p><img src="images/2014/6-secrets-of-arnolds-success-1.jpg" width="560" height="290" class="c10"/><p>Arnold set goals to dominate Hollywood and hold political power. He succeeded in spite of all the naysayers.</p><p>This tension—and the ability to hold it for a prolonged period of time—make a competitive bodybuilder stand out onstage. Arnold called posing and flexing a very important part of a bodybuilder's workout, but beyond that, it also helped him extend his mind-muscle connection beyond when he was lifting. You can see it in "Pumping Iron," when Arnold is flexing even at mealtimes—at least, when he's not taunting his fellow competitors.</p><p>Like fellow isotension devotee Bruce Lee, who blazed the path from cult-sport standout to international film star, Arnold continued this practice through his acting career, keeping the mind-muscle connection front and center.</p><p>The lesson for the rest of us: He eliminated the division between his training and his life. Sure, he "rested," but he never took a break from improving, and he never let his skills lapse. His boundless commitment enabled his return to Mr. Olympia competition in 1980, five years after retiring, when he took the crown with just a few weeks to prepare. That seventh win, over then-superior opponents, helped launch Arnold's first action film, "Conan The Barbarian," and he was on his way to a second crown.</p><h3 class="article-title">Secret 2: </h3><p>As Arnold often pointed out, he was intensely loyal to his favorite movements, like <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-incline-bench-press-medium-grip')">incline bench presses</a>, <a href="javascript:pop('concentration-curls')">concentration curls</a>, and <a href="javascript:pop('arnold-dumbbell-press')">Arnold presses</a>. But within and around these exercises, nothing was sacred. He changed weight amounts, switched grips, added reps, paired exercises for opposing muscle groups, and decreased rests or cut them all together. If one day's routine began to feel familiar, he'd perform it in an unfamiliar order or style.</p><img src="images/2014/6-secrets-of-arnolds-success-2.jpg" width="257" height="403" border="0" class="right-image"/><p>One of his favorite ways to turn the norm on its head was to convert barbell exercises to dumbbell movements. His signature dumbbell movement, the Arnold press, came out of this intuitive approach, and the switch helped him identify any right-left imbalances.</p><p>He was never the strongest, but Arnold was always the most proportioned, and this technique was crucial to creating a physique that seemed devoid of weaknesses.</p><p>"Changing constantly really worked for him, and he seemed to grow right before my very eyes," recalls former training partner Ric Drasin. Embracing unpredictability as a way of life kept him ready for anything, and in his later career, helped him make sure his most ambitious career choice achieve the maximum possible impact.</p><p>This is, after all, a man who, en route to promote "Terminator 3" on "The Tonight Show," decided to use the interview to announce that he was running for governor.</p><h3 class="article-title">Secret 3: </h3><p>Arnold's third crown required true mass appeal, and he had it, in the form of 89 percent approval ratings when he took office. Some responsibility for this unprecedented momentum has to be chalked up to his decision to ease out of the 1980s action genre and into lighter fare like comedies, where he co-starred with opposites: Danny DeVito, Helen Hunt, and the cast of "Kindergarten Cop." Such unpredictable pairings came easily for Arnold. He'd been doing it for years.</p><p>Arnold trained with many different lifters at Gold's, but he was inseparable from 5-foot-3 Franco Columbu through the six consecutive Mr. Olympia titles. "Two restless racehorses in the starting blocks" is how Dave Draper, Arnold's first Gold's partner, recalls the two Europeans when they trained together. They may have both spoken with accents and sported similarly tousled hairdos, but far more important was what <em>separated</em> the two: the 100 extra pounds Franco squatted.</p><img src="images/2014/6-secrets-of-arnolds-success-4.jpg" width="560" height="351"/><p>"It's not a tumor!" Arnold's work in comedies made him a household name.</p><p>Standard wisdom pairs partners of more or less equal strength. Not Arnold. He did back days with Frank Zane, shoulders and chest with stronger men, and legs with Mike Katz, whose NFL career-ending leg injury had led to oversized recuperation. Arnold was similarly quick to help other partners learn from his personal strengths, and his strategy became a maxim at Gold's: "Working together to defeat one another."</p><p>Though he was a big believer in compliments to motivate, his contrarian approach also allowed free use of negative feedback. You'd <em>never</em> cut corners with Arnold or, God forbid, not finish. "If he did his 15 reps and you didn't do your 15 reps," recalls Danny Padilla, "it was like, 'Vat's wrong, I got to do your reps now?' What's up with that? If you can't hang, go back to something else!'"</p><h3 class="article-title">Secret 4: </h3><p>They say that nothing motivates like success. This is true, of course, but what about early in your career, when success is elusive? In bodybuilding, there's always someone bigger or stronger, and this applied to Arnold, too. But nobody had goals that were bigger, and nobody clung to them more tightly than him.</p><img src="images/2014/6-secrets-of-arnolds-success-3.jpg" width="560" height="400"/><p>Arnold did his own thing, but he also listened to bodybuilders and mentors close to him. He knew he needed others and he borrowed knowledge from many sources.</p><p>Arnold's goals were no secret. He wrote them at the start of each year on index cards, and made reference to them often. Some, like a new car or a mail-order business, were short-term, recalls Padilla. Four others, which he announced shortly after arriving at Gold's, took longer: He would "become a movie star, make millions of dollars, marry a glamorous wife, and wield political power."</p><p>Easier said than done, of course. But in Arnold's case, <em>they did get done</em>. He was unique in recognizing that the difference between his short-term and long-term ambitions was one of degree, not kind. A goal is a goal; what matters is how you pursue it.</p><h3 class="article-title">Secret 5: </h3><p>Arnold would later scandalize the bodybuilding community by speaking openly of grass and hash, whiskey in his protein shakes, and a host of other taboo topics. Part of why he felt OK doing this was that he'd arrived at the peak of the freaky 1960s, and he saw that Venice Beach was only a small part of Los Angeles, a community where he and his cohorts were often seen as overgrown freaks.</p><img src="images/2014/6-secrets-of-arnolds-success-5.jpg" width="560" height="315"/><p>He never thought of his body as part of him, but rather as a covering over him which he could manipulate. He was an artist and his body was mere clay.</p><p>Even while he was laboring day and night to be the best bodybuilder in the world, he knew how to turn his ego off and look at himself as others saw him. "It's outside of me and also part of me," he said of his body in an interview with "Playboy" in 1977. "I don't say, 'Arnold, how do you look?' but rather 'Let's check out this body in the mirror and see what it looks like today.' Professionally, I have to be detached in order to be critical of it. I don't criticize myself; I criticize my body."</p><p>When he looked in the mirror, Arnold saw what he wanted quickly: "The goal is to carry the weight but keep the proportion and symmetry." In layman's terms: Keep it real.</p><p>To the uninitiated public, proportion and symmetry were what separated the freak from the superhuman. Arnold was always the latter, never the former. And when he set his sights on being an actor, he was more than willing to put his hard-earned mass on the line. For instance, when director Bob Rafelson asked him to drop from 240 to 210, not wanting him to dwarf Sally Field in 1977's "Stay Hungry," Arnold didn't blink.</p><h3 class="article-title">Secret 6: </h3><p>"The weightlifters shone with sweat … powerful looking, Herculean," Arnold wrote of his first visit to a bodybuilding gym, age 15 in his first autobiography, "The Education of a Bodybuilder." " And there it was before me—my life, the answer I'd been seeking." To this day, Arnold says he's a bodybuilder at heart.</p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0671797484/bodybuildingco05" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img src="images/2014/6-secrets-of-arnolds-success-6.jpg" width="204" height="304" border="0" class="right-image c12"/></a><p>As he continued training, however, Arnold found that simply getting big and strong wasn't really his heart's desire. He had to look deeper. "I discovered that the secret of successful workouts," he later wrote, "had to do with competition." He wanted to win, and he wanted to be noticed for it. In short, he wanted to be famous, and the documentary "Pumping Iron" gave him the perfect launching pad.</p><p>The film opened huge, and just as importantly, it opened when Arnold was up for a Golden Globe for his work in "Stay Hungry." "Of course this brought out the competitor in me," Arnold recalls in his autobiography, "Total Recall." He used the documentary's premiere to build his star power as much as possible. He invited members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, whose members select Golden Globe winners, to the premiere and to a star-studded pre-release lunch featuring celebrities like Andy Warhol—the man who had made fame an art form—and Jackie Onassis.</p><p>All of a sudden, everyone seemed to know who Arnold was, and just in time. He won the Golden Globe, and proceeded to leverage his victory into more parts, more fame, and more victories. It was what he had been looking for all along, and once found he'd never lose it.</p><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/arnold-schwarzenegger-series.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/arnold-blueprint_stack_banner-2.jpg" width="560" height="144"/></a><br class="c13"/></div>

Success By Schwarzenegger: 6 Secrets Of Arnold's Success

By the late 1970s, Arnold Schwarzenegger was no longer just the best bodybuilder in Venice Beach or a six-time Mr. Olympia. On the eve of his 15-mile migration to Hollywood, his level of dominance transcended any superlative or official title. “Arnold was the king,” recalls former training partner Danny Padilla.

The intensity of Schwarzenegger’s Gold’s Gym workouts, while legendary, couldn’t explain it all, or what came afterward. Surely, the Styrian Oak had found some taproot to future success. Ask Arnold himself, as many did, have, and will continue to do, and you’d be likely to get an unsatisfying and straightforward reply. “If there were any secrets, I would have found them by now,” he said at the time. His answer was that there was no substitute for hard work.

Then, against all odds, Arnold became king twice again: First, of the action blockbuster film genre, and then the chief executive of the Great State of California. None of us could say we saw these other victories coming, but when they did, it all seemed to make sense somehow. Three very different crowns, but all three were built on fundamental strengths of this unique giant’s mindset.

Here are six surefire strategies for success that Arnold forged in the crucible of Gold’s Gym, and made work for him in every other part of his life.

Secret 1:

Arnold always stressed the need for rest between sets. But over time, following the advice of trainer Joe Weider, he began devoting an increasing percentage of his rests to what Weider called the “Isotension Principle.” You might know it by another name: flexing.

Here’s how it works in its simplest form: After a final set, continue hitting the targeted muscle by flexing to peak contraction for 3-6 seconds. The action maintains connections of myofibrils, the building blocks of muscle, without resistance. The longer and more repeated the flex, the greater those connections, and over time, the greater the tension your muscle fibers will generate.

Arnold set goals to dominate Hollywood and hold political power. He succeeded in spite of all the naysayers.

This tension—and the ability to hold it for a prolonged period of time—make a competitive bodybuilder stand out onstage. Arnold called posing and flexing a very important part of a bodybuilder’s workout, but beyond that, it also helped him extend his mind-muscle connection beyond when he was lifting. You can see it in “Pumping Iron,” when Arnold is flexing even at mealtimes—at least, when he’s not taunting his fellow competitors.

Like fellow isotension devotee Bruce Lee, who blazed the path from cult-sport standout to international film star, Arnold continued this practice through his acting career, keeping the mind-muscle connection front and center.

The lesson for the rest of us: He eliminated the division between his training and his life. Sure, he “rested,” but he never took a break from improving, and he never let his skills lapse. His boundless commitment enabled his return to Mr. Olympia competition in 1980, five years after retiring, when he took the crown with just a few weeks to prepare. That seventh win, over then-superior opponents, helped launch Arnold’s first action film, “Conan The Barbarian,” and he was on his way to a second crown.

Secret 2:

As Arnold often pointed out, he was intensely loyal to his favorite movements, like incline bench presses, concentration curls, and Arnold presses. But within and around these exercises, nothing was sacred. He changed weight amounts, switched grips, added reps, paired exercises for opposing muscle groups, and decreased rests or cut them all together. If one day’s routine began to feel familiar, he’d perform it in an unfamiliar order or style.

One of his favorite ways to turn the norm on its head was to convert barbell exercises to dumbbell movements. His signature dumbbell movement, the Arnold press, came out of this intuitive approach, and the switch helped him identify any right-left imbalances.

He was never the strongest, but Arnold was always the most proportioned, and this technique was crucial to creating a physique that seemed devoid of weaknesses.

“Changing constantly really worked for him, and he seemed to grow right before my very eyes,” recalls former training partner Ric Drasin. Embracing unpredictability as a way of life kept him ready for anything, and in his later career, helped him make sure his most ambitious career choice achieve the maximum possible impact.

This is, after all, a man who, en route to promote “Terminator 3” on “The Tonight Show,” decided to use the interview to announce that he was running for governor.

Secret 3:

Arnold’s third crown required true mass appeal, and he had it, in the form of 89 percent approval ratings when he took office. Some responsibility for this unprecedented momentum has to be chalked up to his decision to ease out of the 1980s action genre and into lighter fare like comedies, where he co-starred with opposites: Danny DeVito, Helen Hunt, and the cast of “Kindergarten Cop.” Such unpredictable pairings came easily for Arnold. He’d been doing it for years.

Arnold trained with many different lifters at Gold’s, but he was inseparable from 5-foot-3 Franco Columbu through the six consecutive Mr. Olympia titles. “Two restless racehorses in the starting blocks” is how Dave Draper, Arnold’s first Gold’s partner, recalls the two Europeans when they trained together. They may have both spoken with accents and sported similarly tousled hairdos, but far more important was what separated the two: the 100 extra pounds Franco squatted.

“It’s not a tumor!” Arnold’s work in comedies made him a household name.

Standard wisdom pairs partners of more or less equal strength. Not Arnold. He did back days with Frank Zane, shoulders and chest with stronger men, and legs with Mike Katz, whose NFL career-ending leg injury had led to oversized recuperation. Arnold was similarly quick to help other partners learn from his personal strengths, and his strategy became a maxim at Gold’s: “Working together to defeat one another.”

Though he was a big believer in compliments to motivate, his contrarian approach also allowed free use of negative feedback. You’d never cut corners with Arnold or, God forbid, not finish. “If he did his 15 reps and you didn’t do your 15 reps,” recalls Danny Padilla, “it was like, ‘Vat’s wrong, I got to do your reps now?’ What’s up with that? If you can’t hang, go back to something else!'”

Secret 4:

They say that nothing motivates like success. This is true, of course, but what about early in your career, when success is elusive? In bodybuilding, there’s always someone bigger or stronger, and this applied to Arnold, too. But nobody had goals that were bigger, and nobody clung to them more tightly than him.

Arnold did his own thing, but he also listened to bodybuilders and mentors close to him. He knew he needed others and he borrowed knowledge from many sources.

Arnold’s goals were no secret. He wrote them at the start of each year on index cards, and made reference to them often. Some, like a new car or a mail-order business, were short-term, recalls Padilla. Four others, which he announced shortly after arriving at Gold’s, took longer: He would “become a movie star, make millions of dollars, marry a glamorous wife, and wield political power.”

Easier said than done, of course. But in Arnold’s case, they did get done. He was unique in recognizing that the difference between his short-term and long-term ambitions was one of degree, not kind. A goal is a goal; what matters is how you pursue it.

Secret 5:

Arnold would later scandalize the bodybuilding community by speaking openly of grass and hash, whiskey in his protein shakes, and a host of other taboo topics. Part of why he felt OK doing this was that he’d arrived at the peak of the freaky 1960s, and he saw that Venice Beach was only a small part of Los Angeles, a community where he and his cohorts were often seen as overgrown freaks.

He never thought of his body as part of him, but rather as a covering over him which he could manipulate. He was an artist and his body was mere clay.

Even while he was laboring day and night to be the best bodybuilder in the world, he knew how to turn his ego off and look at himself as others saw him. “It’s outside of me and also part of me,” he said of his body in an interview with “Playboy” in 1977. “I don’t say, ‘Arnold, how do you look?’ but rather ‘Let’s check out this body in the mirror and see what it looks like today.’ Professionally, I have to be detached in order to be critical of it. I don’t criticize myself; I criticize my body.”

When he looked in the mirror, Arnold saw what he wanted quickly: “The goal is to carry the weight but keep the proportion and symmetry.” In layman’s terms: Keep it real.

To the uninitiated public, proportion and symmetry were what separated the freak from the superhuman. Arnold was always the latter, never the former. And when he set his sights on being an actor, he was more than willing to put his hard-earned mass on the line. For instance, when director Bob Rafelson asked him to drop from 240 to 210, not wanting him to dwarf Sally Field in 1977’s “Stay Hungry,” Arnold didn’t blink.

Secret 6:

“The weightlifters shone with sweat … powerful looking, Herculean,” Arnold wrote of his first visit to a bodybuilding gym, age 15 in his first autobiography, “The Education of a Bodybuilder.” ” And there it was before me—my life, the answer I’d been seeking.” To this day, Arnold says he’s a bodybuilder at heart.

As he continued training, however, Arnold found that simply getting big and strong wasn’t really his heart’s desire. He had to look deeper. “I discovered that the secret of successful workouts,” he later wrote, “had to do with competition.” He wanted to win, and he wanted to be noticed for it. In short, he wanted to be famous, and the documentary “Pumping Iron” gave him the perfect launching pad.

The film opened huge, and just as importantly, it opened when Arnold was up for a Golden Globe for his work in “Stay Hungry.” “Of course this brought out the competitor in me,” Arnold recalls in his autobiography, “Total Recall.” He used the documentary’s premiere to build his star power as much as possible. He invited members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, whose members select Golden Globe winners, to the premiere and to a star-studded pre-release lunch featuring celebrities like Andy Warhol—the man who had made fame an art form—and Jackie Onassis.

All of a sudden, everyone seemed to know who Arnold was, and just in time. He won the Golden Globe, and proceeded to leverage his victory into more parts, more fame, and more victories. It was what he had been looking for all along, and once found he’d never lose it.


More here: 

Success By Schwarzenegger: 6 Secrets Of Arnold's Success

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, NutritionComments Off on Success By Schwarzenegger: 6 Secrets Of Arnold's Success


Paige Hathaway

18 hours 53 minutes ago

What's the best way to burn fat you ask?

Mixing in HIIT training or plyo metrics to your lifting routine is the absolute best way (besides getting your diet in order) to burn fat and build muscle! Instead of resting in between sets.. add this move or moves similar! This will keep your heart rate up and core engaged! #hellosummerbody

This move: INCH WORM PUSH-UP BURPEES / 8-10 reps

Example of mixing this into your circuit:
Leg extension 12-15 reps
Leg press (quad focused feet positioning) 12-15 reps (normally you would rest here) but instead..
NO REST - INCH WORM PUSH-UP BURPEES / 8-10 reps
No rest and repeat x3-4
(your rest is basically you on the leg extension)
Music 🎶 American Teen #khalid

Paige Hathaway

1 day 3 hours ago

Midday/Preworkout snack Big Slice Apples
More importantly why I like this on the go pouch, is when I am moving around from shoot to shoot, meeting to meeting and gym session to gym session, #bigslice is the perfect snack to keep me going, when I need a quick boost. 😋🍎
............... Check them out #GNC #Sprouts #Wholefoods

Categories

June 2017
MTWTFSS
« May  
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930 
Content Protected Using Blog Protector By: PcDrome.

Enjoy this blog? Please spread the word :)