Tag Archive | "california"

10 ways to be more active

1 Choose the furthest corner

Instead of fighting for parking spots closest to the supermarket doors, park your car as far away as possible. This gives you the opportunity to walk further, for longer – and it’s less stressful, too.

2 Skip the lift

Stop taking the lift and take the stairs instead. It’ll get your heart pumping and body moving to build your fitness levels, plus climbing the stairs requires your bum, thigh and calf muscles to engage, helping to tone and sculpt your legs – a win-win!

3 Walk the last stop

If you commute to work by bus, jump off one stop early – or even two! – to increase
the distance you walk. Not only will this
add in some extra cardio exercise to your
day – particularly if you march at a fast pace – it’ll burn a few extra calories, too.  

4 Get pedalling

Boost your fitness by cycling to and from work. It’s a great way to get two cardio workouts into your day without having to take time out to exercise. Cycling is also a great way to tone up and keep those calories burning

 5 Use your lunch hour

Instead of staying glued to your computer screen, use your lunch hour for some retail therapy or a wander in the park. Just 20 minutes walking around the block, will help perk you up and boost your motivation. And, of course, it will add that extra bit of physical activity into your day. In fact, according to a recent study conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
in California, walking briskly can lower your risk of high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes as much as running. Walk on!

6 Leave your car at home

If you have kids, walk them to school instead of driving, if it’s close enough. Not only will you start your day with a spring in your step, but walking to school will also encourage your kids to be more active, and it also helps reduce pollution. If walking isn’t an option, why not take them to the park after school or to the swings to play? And make sure you run around as much as your kids do!

7 Stand up more!

While talking on the phone, whether at home or in the office, get out of your chair and stand up or pace up and down. As well as helping you to focus on the conversation, this can have real benefits for your health. A study by Dr John Buckley and a team of researchers from the University of Chester proved that standing for a total of three hours each day will burn up an extra 144 calories. Over a year, that adds up to about 30,000 more calories or eight pounds of fat!

8 Be a tourist

Instead of the usual catch-up over coffee and cake or dinner, why not arrange
a jog around the park with a friend instead
or book onto a sightseeing tour around your nearest city. You’ll still have a chance to chat, but you’ll get in a bit of extra cardio, too.

9 Get your groove on

Spending your evenings slumped in front of the TV after a stressful day at work? Why not create a playlist of some of your favourite songs and have a dance around your bedroom for 15 minutes (or longer!) instead? Or look up dance classes you can join in your area. Not only does dancing
help boost self-confidence, but it’s a great chance to get a sweat on and burn some extra calories. A study published by the American Council on Exercise found that dance-based workouts can burn 200-400 calories per hour – almost as much as you burn swimming, cycling or walking. 

10 Invest in a pedometer

Record the number of steps you take each day with a pedometer. Then challenge yourself to increase the number every day or have a competition with your partner
or friend to see who can bank the most steps. This will boost your motivation
and get you more active

See original article – 

10 ways to be more active

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight lossComments Off on 10 ways to be more active

<div id="DPG" webReader="271.593675993"><div class="side-bar" webReader="-13.1859296482"><div class="c10"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/ric-drasin-vital-stats-box.jpg"/></div><h3 class="article-title c11">Vital Stats</h3><a href="https://www.facebook.com/ric.drasin" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Facebook"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/facebook-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c12"/></a><a href="https://twitter.com/ricdrasin" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Twitter"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/twitter-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c13"/></a><a href="http://instagram.com/ricdrasin#" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Instagram"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/instagram-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c13"/></a><a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/ricdrasin" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="YouTube"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/youtube-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c13"/></a><p><strong>Name:</strong> Ric Drasin<br /><strong>Occupation:</strong> Artist, actor, talk show host, former professional wrestler, creator of the Gold's Gym logo<br /><strong>Location:</strong> Van Nuys, CA<br /><strong>Website:</strong> <a href="www.ricdrasin.com" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">www.ricdrasin.com</a>, <a href="www.ricscorner.com" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">www.ricscorner.com</a></p></div><p>I still remember the first time I walked in the door at Gold's Gym in 1970. I had been training at Bill Pearl's gym in Inglewood for most of the past year and seeing great results, but a few of my friends had convinced me to make the switch. I was trying to make my name as a wrestler, not a bodybuilder, but I knew this was the place to build an elite body.</p><p>Right away, I saw greats like Dave Draper, Frank Zane, Ken Waller, and Eddie Giuliani training together. Then I saw Arnold. Come to think of it, everyone noticed when he came in the room. He was about 260 pounds, huge, and in great shape. We had met once before, but once I was at Gold's, we quickly became friends and started doing some chest and back workouts together. We were on the same page with training, and even better, had a similar sense of humor.</p><p>Over the next few years, I had a unique window into what drove Arnold during his peak competitive years, as I've often discussed on my online show <a href="http://videos.bodybuilding.com/tags/drasin">Ric's Corner</a>. He was able to achieve things that no one else from our community did, and it wasn't by accident. Here's what made Arnold—the bodybuilder, the star, and the man—great.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">1 He loved to train</h3>
</p><p>Sure, the workouts we did were hard and grueling. But we also knew that training is supposed to be fun, so we made it that way. Arnold trained hard, and there were no secrets to his gains other than pounding out the sets and reps with good heavy weights. Of course we all eventually had injuries to deal with that changed the game, but in the early days, there was nothing more fun than intense, heavy training with classic movements.</p><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-main.html"><img src="images/2014/15-things-that-made-arnold-great-graphics-1.jpg" width="560" height="315" border="0"/></a><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">2 He used variety—but not too much</h3>
</p><p>Arnold liked to vary the exercises and throw in new movements weekly to change things up, but the sets and reps usually stayed pretty consistent. The <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-main.html">Arnold Blueprint trainer</a> is a good representation of the sort of work he did. Nevertheless, he knew that there were some movements that always needed to be a priority. For instance, we would occasionally compete in bench press, primarily because Arnold was so competitive and I always had a slight edge on that lift. My best was 455 pounds, and I think his was around 440.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">3 He liked old-fashioned cardio</h3>
</p><p>Today, it seems like nearly everybody in the weight room has built a wall around themselves in the form of a pair of headphones. This is even more the case when it comes to cardio, where you watch TV while you work the treadmill or bike. Talk about solitary confinement! Back in our day, there were none of these machines, and "cardio" was a run on the beach. It was fun, social, and <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/a-day-in-arnolds-life.html">as Arnold has said recently</a>, it was the best way to build a tan that didn't suck.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">4 He relied on proven nutrition principles</h3>
</p><p>When we were training at our peak, supplements were pretty limited. Sure, we had protein at times, but that was about as far as it went, so most of what we built was powered by eating real food—and <em>good</em> food. I'm talking about high protein, high fat, and limited carbs, like nutrition experts are starting to advocate more and more these days. Funny how it all comes around.</p><img src="images/2014/15-things-that-made-arnold-great-graphics-2.jpg" width="560" height="326" border="0"/><p>"Most of what we built was powered by eating real food—and <em>good</em> food. I'm talking about high protein, high fat, and limited carbs."</p><p>Our hangout was Zucky's Delicatessen in Santa Monica, and everyone there knew us—especially after Arnold began dating the hostess. Every night we would head over for a cheese omelet, our final helping of protein.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">5 He learned from his training</h3>
</p><p>People talk about someone having a "winning personality," but until they've met Arnold, they've never really seen it in its purest form. He approached every situation with the expectation that he would get what he wanted, both inside the gym and out.</p><p>He trained hard, ate right and saw his future place in a bigger picture. He knew discipline was the key if the end result was going to be good. He paid his dues overcoming a language barrier, becoming a United States citizen, and learning his way in a new country. From the start, the gym was his home base and most comfortable environment. Once he found his way there, he attacked everything else in his life in the same way.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">6 His strategic charm</h3>
</p><p>Arnold was a great negotiator and would make deals with companies around the world to use his name as it grew. He'd get supplements, cars, and just about anything else he'd ask for. His charm was the key to his greatness. He could charm anyone out of anything, and people really liked him. I haven't seen anyone like him since. Bodybuilders today could really learn from this, although it was really just his natural way.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">7 His non-strategic charm</h3>
</p><img src="images/2014/15-things-that-made-arnold-great-graphics-3.jpg" width="281" height="331" border="0" class="float-right c15"/><p>"Arnold was very good at getting attention, but he was also attentive to others."</p><p>Arnold had the personality and charisma to attract people, and he loved every minute of it. He was very good at getting attention, but he was also attentive to others, which made everyone feel comfortable around him. Although he was huge and imposing, his personality was the opposite.</p><p>My mom, who lived to 97, always told her friends of the time that I brought Arnold over to her house and she made dinner for him, me, and my grandmother. He and my grandmother were from the same city in Austria, and it was quite a fun night where they had a lot to talk about. Both my mother and grandmother remembered that night for as long as they lived, but not just because Arnold was famous. It was because he made time for them, and because he was a fun guy, a great listener, and a natural storyteller.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">8 He shared</h3>
</p><p>People sometimes portray Arnold as a kind of egomaniac, but the truth is that he was very generous when it came helping others. He introduced me to <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/the-protein-pioneer-lessons-from-a-golden-age-nutritional-guru.html">Rheo Blair</a>, who at that time was the guru of supplements and famous for his Blair's Protein, which was the best around and the most expensive. He set me up with Blair to do modeling with product ads in exchange for free supplements. Every month I could load up, and this was due to Arnold. He didn't have to do this; he simply wanted to help me.</p><img src="images/2014/15-things-that-made-arnold-great-graphics-4.jpg" width="560" height="456" border="0" class="c17"/><h6 class="altH6 c18">"Rheo Blair Golden-Age Nutrition Guru."</h6><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">9 He wasn't afraid to fail</h3>
</p><p>One day Arnold mentioned that he had a movie audition and asked if I would go with him, since there may be a role for me. I agreed, and later that night we drove up to Burbank. The dialogue was kind of biblical-sounding, complicated, and hard to read. Arnold stumbled over the words, and we both ended up laughing our way through it.</p><p>The producers didn't really care, because they liked Arnold anyway. We got back into the car and Arnold asked what I thought about it. I told him that he sucked and should forget acting altogether. Little did I know who he would become.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">10 His persistence</h3>
</p><p>He wouldn't take no for an answer on any level, and had extreme confidence when asking for something. I took a ride with him out to Joe Weider's office to collect some money for expenses. When we got there, Arnold asked Joe for a check, and Joe tried to hold him off. Arnold responded by reaching into Joe's jacket, pulling out the checkbook, and filling out a check. Then he said, "Joe, sign it." Of course Joe did. Arnold was incredibly persistent when going after something he wanted, and Joe loved Arnold, so it always worked out.</p><img src="images/2014/15-things-that-made-arnold-great-graphics-5.jpg" width="560" height="386" border="0"/><p>"Arnold wouldn't take no for an answer on any level, and had extreme confidence when asking for something."</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">11 His sense of humor</h3>
</p><p>As countless people can attest, Arnold was great at helping people in the gym, even when he didn't know them. However, his sense of humor would sometimes get away from him. Once, he took one of the gym members up to the dressing room and had him pose naked, screaming when he'd flex his biceps and growling when going into a most-muscular shot. He also had the guy pose and rub down with motor oil. I'm sure the guy felt pretty stupid afterward, but in the long run, hijinks like these helped make the gym a more fun place for all of us to spend so many long hours.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">12 He could multitask</h3>
</p><p>At some point during the years we trained together, Arnold decided acting was the next thing for him. He had a vision of where he could take it, and he studied acting and put his best effort into it. He also began rubbing elbows with the right people, and sure enough, when doors opened for him, his charm took him through those doors to greater things.</p><img src="images/2014/15-things-that-made-arnold-great-graphics-6.jpg" width="560" height="292" border="0"/><p>"His drive, focus, and discipline were far beyond the average person, and he could apply these attributes wherever and however heneeded in order to achieve his goals."</p><p>But here's the amazing part: His bodybuilding didn't suffer at all as a result. He still competed in and won Mr. Olympia while pursuing acting and thriving in numerous other moneymaking projects. His drive, focus, and discipline were far beyond the average person, and he could apply these attributes wherever and however he needed in order to achieve his goals.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">13 He was always Arnold</h3>
</p><p>As Arnold's success in bodybuilding turned into success in films, he began meeting and befriending more and more influential people. At that point, he went off in a different direction from the rest of us at Gold's Gym, and a different group of people gathered around him. It changed again once he got involved with politics. But Arnold was always Arnold. Every once in a while, he would show up at a memorial for one of our friends, and it was the same old Arnold around us, as just one of the guys.</p><p>Every now and then, he still shows up down in Venice on his bike or in his car, and he's incredibly open and friendly to every kid and fan he meets down there. Just like in the old days, pretty much everyone who crosses paths with him remembers it afterward with a smile.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">14 He stuck to his roots</h3>
</p><img src="images/2014/15-things-that-made-arnold-great-graphics-7.jpg" width="185" height="326" border="0" class="float-right c15"/><p>It's amazing that after all those years and all his accomplishments, Arnold has always kept his love for bodybuilding. At a time when he was a huge movie star, he still found time to <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-a-z-the-essential-arnold-schwarzenegger-library.html">write books that explained exactly how to achieve their physical potential</a>. And today he's still at it, promoting the <a href="http://arnoldsportsfestival.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Arnold Sports Festival</a> in the states and abroad, living the fitness lifestyle and doing what he loves best.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">15 He wasn't afraid to grow</h3>
</p><p>He's the only person on Earth who has succeeded dramatically in the worlds of bodybuilding, film, and politics. He had one of the best bodies in the world, was one of the largest box office draws in history, and became Governor of California in a landslide victory. None of these things happened by accident. They all took a lot of work and study. No one handed anything to him; he worked hard for all of it. And the prize is that his name, face, and body are recognized around the world.</p><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/arnold-schwarzenegger-series/blueprint-to-mass-stack.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/arnold-blueprint_stack_bannerbig-b.jpg" width="560" height="360" class="c19"/></a><br class="c20"/><h3 class="article-title">Recommended For You</h3><div class="c23" webReader="5.00917431193"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-mass-training.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/arnold-blueprint_training_overview_sm.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c22" webReader="6.16513761468"><h4 class="c21"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-mass-training.html">Arnold's Blueprint Trainer: Mass Training Overview</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Watch this video to learn some of Arnold Schwarzenegger's favorite exercises and preferred training techniques for building muscle. Get the knowledge you need to grow!</p></div></div><div class="c23" webReader="5.02008928571"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-mass-nutrition.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/arnold-blueprint_nutrition_overview_smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c22" webReader="6.17857142857"><h4 class="c21"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-mass-nutrition.html">Arnold's Blueprint Trainer: Mass Nutrition Overview</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Quality mass comes from quality calories. Arnold Schwarzenegger knew that fact inside and out. Learn more about how he ate and follow his nutrition blueprint for more mass!</p></div></div><div class="c23" webReader="4.62878787879"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-mass-supplementation.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/arnold-blueprint_supplementation_overview_smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c22" webReader="5.69696969697"><h4 class="c21"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-mass-supplementation.html">Arnold's Blueprint Trainer: Mass Supplementation Overview</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Look under the hood of Arnold Schwarzenegger's signature supplement line! Learn about the products Arnold recommends for incredible results.</p></div></div></div>

15 Things That Made Arnold Schwarzenegger Great

I still remember the first time I walked in the door at Gold’s Gym in 1970. I had been training at Bill Pearl’s gym in Inglewood for most of the past year and seeing great results, but a few of my friends had convinced me to make the switch. I was trying to make my name as a wrestler, not a bodybuilder, but I knew this was the place to build an elite body.

Right away, I saw greats like Dave Draper, Frank Zane, Ken Waller, and Eddie Giuliani training together. Then I saw Arnold. Come to think of it, everyone noticed when he came in the room. He was about 260 pounds, huge, and in great shape. We had met once before, but once I was at Gold’s, we quickly became friends and started doing some chest and back workouts together. We were on the same page with training, and even better, had a similar sense of humor.

Over the next few years, I had a unique window into what drove Arnold during his peak competitive years, as I’ve often discussed on my online show Ric’s Corner. He was able to achieve things that no one else from our community did, and it wasn’t by accident. Here’s what made Arnold—the bodybuilder, the star, and the man—great.

1 He loved to train

Sure, the workouts we did were hard and grueling. But we also knew that training is supposed to be fun, so we made it that way. Arnold trained hard, and there were no secrets to his gains other than pounding out the sets and reps with good heavy weights. Of course we all eventually had injuries to deal with that changed the game, but in the early days, there was nothing more fun than intense, heavy training with classic movements.

2 He used variety—but not too much

Arnold liked to vary the exercises and throw in new movements weekly to change things up, but the sets and reps usually stayed pretty consistent. The Arnold Blueprint trainer is a good representation of the sort of work he did. Nevertheless, he knew that there were some movements that always needed to be a priority. For instance, we would occasionally compete in bench press, primarily because Arnold was so competitive and I always had a slight edge on that lift. My best was 455 pounds, and I think his was around 440.

3 He liked old-fashioned cardio

Today, it seems like nearly everybody in the weight room has built a wall around themselves in the form of a pair of headphones. This is even more the case when it comes to cardio, where you watch TV while you work the treadmill or bike. Talk about solitary confinement! Back in our day, there were none of these machines, and “cardio” was a run on the beach. It was fun, social, and as Arnold has said recently, it was the best way to build a tan that didn’t suck.

4 He relied on proven nutrition principles

When we were training at our peak, supplements were pretty limited. Sure, we had protein at times, but that was about as far as it went, so most of what we built was powered by eating real food—and good food. I’m talking about high protein, high fat, and limited carbs, like nutrition experts are starting to advocate more and more these days. Funny how it all comes around.

“Most of what we built was powered by eating real food—and good food. I’m talking about high protein, high fat, and limited carbs.”

Our hangout was Zucky’s Delicatessen in Santa Monica, and everyone there knew us—especially after Arnold began dating the hostess. Every night we would head over for a cheese omelet, our final helping of protein.

5 He learned from his training

People talk about someone having a “winning personality,” but until they’ve met Arnold, they’ve never really seen it in its purest form. He approached every situation with the expectation that he would get what he wanted, both inside the gym and out.

He trained hard, ate right and saw his future place in a bigger picture. He knew discipline was the key if the end result was going to be good. He paid his dues overcoming a language barrier, becoming a United States citizen, and learning his way in a new country. From the start, the gym was his home base and most comfortable environment. Once he found his way there, he attacked everything else in his life in the same way.

6 His strategic charm

Arnold was a great negotiator and would make deals with companies around the world to use his name as it grew. He’d get supplements, cars, and just about anything else he’d ask for. His charm was the key to his greatness. He could charm anyone out of anything, and people really liked him. I haven’t seen anyone like him since. Bodybuilders today could really learn from this, although it was really just his natural way.

7 His non-strategic charm

“Arnold was very good at getting attention, but he was also attentive to others.”

Arnold had the personality and charisma to attract people, and he loved every minute of it. He was very good at getting attention, but he was also attentive to others, which made everyone feel comfortable around him. Although he was huge and imposing, his personality was the opposite.

My mom, who lived to 97, always told her friends of the time that I brought Arnold over to her house and she made dinner for him, me, and my grandmother. He and my grandmother were from the same city in Austria, and it was quite a fun night where they had a lot to talk about. Both my mother and grandmother remembered that night for as long as they lived, but not just because Arnold was famous. It was because he made time for them, and because he was a fun guy, a great listener, and a natural storyteller.

8 He shared

People sometimes portray Arnold as a kind of egomaniac, but the truth is that he was very generous when it came helping others. He introduced me to Rheo Blair, who at that time was the guru of supplements and famous for his Blair’s Protein, which was the best around and the most expensive. He set me up with Blair to do modeling with product ads in exchange for free supplements. Every month I could load up, and this was due to Arnold. He didn’t have to do this; he simply wanted to help me.

“Rheo Blair Golden-Age Nutrition Guru.”

9 He wasn’t afraid to fail

One day Arnold mentioned that he had a movie audition and asked if I would go with him, since there may be a role for me. I agreed, and later that night we drove up to Burbank. The dialogue was kind of biblical-sounding, complicated, and hard to read. Arnold stumbled over the words, and we both ended up laughing our way through it.

The producers didn’t really care, because they liked Arnold anyway. We got back into the car and Arnold asked what I thought about it. I told him that he sucked and should forget acting altogether. Little did I know who he would become.

10 His persistence

He wouldn’t take no for an answer on any level, and had extreme confidence when asking for something. I took a ride with him out to Joe Weider’s office to collect some money for expenses. When we got there, Arnold asked Joe for a check, and Joe tried to hold him off. Arnold responded by reaching into Joe’s jacket, pulling out the checkbook, and filling out a check. Then he said, “Joe, sign it.” Of course Joe did. Arnold was incredibly persistent when going after something he wanted, and Joe loved Arnold, so it always worked out.

“Arnold wouldn’t take no for an answer on any level, and had extreme confidence when asking for something.”

11 His sense of humor

As countless people can attest, Arnold was great at helping people in the gym, even when he didn’t know them. However, his sense of humor would sometimes get away from him. Once, he took one of the gym members up to the dressing room and had him pose naked, screaming when he’d flex his biceps and growling when going into a most-muscular shot. He also had the guy pose and rub down with motor oil. I’m sure the guy felt pretty stupid afterward, but in the long run, hijinks like these helped make the gym a more fun place for all of us to spend so many long hours.

12 He could multitask

At some point during the years we trained together, Arnold decided acting was the next thing for him. He had a vision of where he could take it, and he studied acting and put his best effort into it. He also began rubbing elbows with the right people, and sure enough, when doors opened for him, his charm took him through those doors to greater things.

“His drive, focus, and discipline were far beyond the average person, and he could apply these attributes wherever and however heneeded in order to achieve his goals.”

But here’s the amazing part: His bodybuilding didn’t suffer at all as a result. He still competed in and won Mr. Olympia while pursuing acting and thriving in numerous other moneymaking projects. His drive, focus, and discipline were far beyond the average person, and he could apply these attributes wherever and however he needed in order to achieve his goals.

13 He was always Arnold

As Arnold’s success in bodybuilding turned into success in films, he began meeting and befriending more and more influential people. At that point, he went off in a different direction from the rest of us at Gold’s Gym, and a different group of people gathered around him. It changed again once he got involved with politics. But Arnold was always Arnold. Every once in a while, he would show up at a memorial for one of our friends, and it was the same old Arnold around us, as just one of the guys.

Every now and then, he still shows up down in Venice on his bike or in his car, and he’s incredibly open and friendly to every kid and fan he meets down there. Just like in the old days, pretty much everyone who crosses paths with him remembers it afterward with a smile.

14 He stuck to his roots

It’s amazing that after all those years and all his accomplishments, Arnold has always kept his love for bodybuilding. At a time when he was a huge movie star, he still found time to write books that explained exactly how to achieve their physical potential. And today he’s still at it, promoting the Arnold Sports Festival in the states and abroad, living the fitness lifestyle and doing what he loves best.

15 He wasn’t afraid to grow

He’s the only person on Earth who has succeeded dramatically in the worlds of bodybuilding, film, and politics. He had one of the best bodies in the world, was one of the largest box office draws in history, and became Governor of California in a landslide victory. None of these things happened by accident. They all took a lot of work and study. No one handed anything to him; he worked hard for all of it. And the prize is that his name, face, and body are recognized around the world.

Recommended For You

Arnold’s Blueprint Trainer: Mass Training Overview

Watch this video to learn some of Arnold Schwarzenegger’s favorite exercises and preferred training techniques for building muscle. Get the knowledge you need to grow!

Arnold’s Blueprint Trainer: Mass Nutrition Overview

Quality mass comes from quality calories. Arnold Schwarzenegger knew that fact inside and out. Learn more about how he ate and follow his nutrition blueprint for more mass!

Arnold’s Blueprint Trainer: Mass Supplementation Overview

Look under the hood of Arnold Schwarzenegger’s signature supplement line! Learn about the products Arnold recommends for incredible results.

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15 Things That Made Arnold Schwarzenegger Great

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Body Transformation: Kenneth Meyer Scorched 279 Pounds Of Fat!

Why I decided to transform

I was extremely obese growing up. I ate too much and had an addiction to food. At age 18, I went to the doctor after getting sick and weighed 469 pounds. I couldn’t eat whole foods for a few weeks and lost weight from being sick. That’s when I decided to keep it going and lose more weight.

My desire to join the military also motivated me to lose weight. I lost a little bit of fat but stayed around 435 pounds. After I tuned 19 years old, my dad hurt his ankle and went to a physical trainer. My dad proceeded to tell the trainer about me and asked if I could be helped.

On March 2, 2011, I met my physical trainer, Dave Greene. At the time, I weighed 433 pounds with 55 percent body fat. He built a meal and exercise plan for me and it worked. It was difficult at first and seemed like I would never reach my goal.

After about a month with my trainer and meal plan, I started to see the weight come off. I dove into exercise, learned about healthy living, and it completely changed my life.

Before

After

AGE 18 / HEIGHT 6’2″ / BODY FAT 60%

AGE 21 / HEIGHT 6’3″ / BODY FAT 8%

Post To Fitboard

Three years later, I joined the U.S. Navy when I became physically fit enough. I was 190 pounds with 8 percent body fat. I lost 281 pounds and 47 percent body fat thanks to my trainer. I couldn’t believe the hard work paid off.

I should thank my dad for hurting his ankle and leading me to a physical trainer. My life is much different now. I can play sports and have energy to be active. My self-esteem and confidence are high and I always notice little things I do now that I couldn’t before. Now I fit in restaurant booths, airplanes, and rollercoaster’s. I can shop at regular clothing stores now and don’t have to worry about breaking chairs.

How I accomplished my goals

After starting my meal and exercise plan, I started to think it was possible to lose the weight. I tried many times before but nothing worked. When I realized it would take the gym, a change in eating habits, and a lifestyle overhaul, I realized I could accomplish my goals.

I met once per week with my physical trainer to check my weight and make changes if needed. It helped me stay accountable and was encouraging. After every meeting, I got more into fitness and it slowly became a lifestyle. I started researching workout routines and meal plans on Bodybuilding.com to see how other people accomplished their goals.

“My self-esteem and confidence are high and I always notice little things I do now that I couldn’t before.”

My dad told me to write down my goals with achievement dates and read them every day when I woke up, which kept me motivated. I love learning about nutrition and fitness and believe that helped me stay motivated and on track for. Throughout everything, I kept the image of myself in a military uniform in my head.

Time flew by during the past few years. I cannot thank my parents, family, friends, and physical trainer, Dave, enough for the help and encouragement.

Apply Here To Be A Transformation Of The Week!

Apply Here To Be A Transformation
Of The Week!

Bodybuilding.com honors people across all transformation categories for their hard work and dedication. Learn how our featured transformers overcame obstacles and hit their goals!

Supplements that helped me through the journey

Diet plan that guided my transformation

Training regimen that kept me on track

When I first started, I was only able to walk on a treadmill, but I quickly built up my ability to exercise and slowly increased the amount over time. I also started boxing and playing basketball with my friends.

What aspect challenged me the most

I quickly fell in love with the gym. The most difficult part was going out with friends at restaurants when I couldn’t eat. I built strong discipline and self-control in the past few years.

My future fitness plans

I’m trying to build more muscle now that the fat is gone. I still run a lot because I like to maintain my cardio for the military. Fitness will always be part of my life.

I would like to become a physical trainer or nutritionist to help others. I learned a lot and can help people who are trying to lose weight. I experienced many ups and down during my journey and would love to share and help others who struggle too.

“Write down your goals, set a date to reach them, and read them to yourself every day.”

Suggestions for aspiring transformers

Write down your goals, set a date to reach them, and read them to yourself every day. Make sure to journal your workouts and food so you can track improvement.

How Bodybuilding.com helped me reach my goals

Bodybuilding.com is the best website I found during my fitness journey. It has so much information and is stocked with encouraging people. Every workout plan I need is on Bodybuilding.com.

The articles pump me up to go to the gym and motivate me. I read the articles about nutrition mostly. I learned many recipes and ideas for cooking and baking.

I thank Bodybuilding.com for the motivation and information to help me accomplish my weight loss and fitness goals.

Kenneth’s Top 5 Gym Tracks

  1. “Zero” by Smashing Pumpkins
  2. “Law Of Nature” by Sixfingerz
  3. “I Stand Alone” by Godsmack
  4. “Clap Back” by Ja Rule
  5. “Alive” by Kid Cudi (Feat. Ratatat)

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Sean was tired of screwing around with fad diets and unreliable training programs. See how this fighter took his fat to the cleaners and lost 127 pounds in two years!

Body Transformation: Eric Hicks Torched 131 Pounds To Reveal Ripped Muscle!

Eric refused to follow his dad’s diabetic fate and committed to change his lifestyle. See how he lost 131 pounds with a healthy mix of training and nutrition!

Body Transformation: Micah Van Yperen Went From Pudgy To Pumped Up!

Micah completely changed his body composition as a teen and turned fat to muscle after years of hard work in the gym and kitchen. See how you can too!


About The Author

Have you made a dramatic change either by gaining muscle of by losing all the weight you have been hoping for?

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Body Transformation: Kenneth Meyer Scorched 279 Pounds Of Fat!

Posted in Bodybuilding, Diets, Exercises, Nutrition, Weight lossComments Off on Body Transformation: Kenneth Meyer Scorched 279 Pounds Of Fat!

<div id="DPG" webReader="166"><p>As nice as it would be to have unlimited training time, it's simply not in the cards for most people. The gym is great, but a little thing called life often throws a wrench in your best-laid plans. Realistically, even the most dedicated people can only attend the gym 3-5 days per week for an hour per day, and that's with a little luck.</p><p>The good news is that one hour per session is plenty of time, <em>if</em> you use your time wisely! You just have to be smart with your exercise selection and workout program. Enter "power pairings," which are specific superset-style exercise pairs I created to help you get the most out of your precious training time.</p><p>As with any superset, you perform power pairings without resting between the paired exercises. Take a bench press and chin-up pair, for example. You perform one set of bench press followed immediately by a set of chin-ups. You won't rest until after you complete both exercises.</p><h3 class="article-title">Pairing Power</h3><img class="float-right" src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/power-pairings-1.jpg" width="287" height="309" border="0"/><p>"Full-body workouts are my go-to method when life gets hectic."</p><p>Power pairings can be useful within full-body routines or body-part splits, but for this article I'll explain how to use them in full-body routines. Full-body workouts are my go-to method when life gets hectic. In a full-body routine, you'd use a power pairing after your primary lift. This allows you to give your first lift maximum attention and strength.</p><p>Start your workout with a big-bang strength movement and devote your full energy and attention to it. When you finish your main lift, implement a power pairing as your finisher. Power pairings use one piece of equipment and require little to no setup, which makes them easy to use even in crowded gyms.</p><p>Here are four power pairings that you can add to your own training program to cut down on your overall workout time and still get a great training effect!</p><p>
<h4 class="c11">1 Ring Dip And Chin-Up/Hip Thrust Combo</h4>
</p><p>Pair ring dips with a chin-up/hip thrust combination exercise I created to blast the back, glutes, and hamstrings simultaneously. Rather than confusing you by trying to explain the exercise, here's a video of what it looks like in action:</p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/JVkn1pHcB5E" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p>From a strength and muscle-building standpoint, this pairing works well because the exercises focus on different body parts, so they won't negatively impact each other or impair your strength. From a logistical standpoint, it's a great pair because the ring height is the same for each exercise, which means no necessary adjustments between sets.</p><p>To up the ante, try the pairing in a countdown format, as demonstrated in the video. Rather than doing straight sets of each exercise, start by doing decreasing sets of 10, 8, 6, 4, and 2 reps of each exercise with little to no rest between sets. Be warned: This is not for the faint of heart.</p><p>Use it: This pair works as a brutal finisher to cap off a great heavy, knee-dominant exercise like the front squat, back squat, split squat, or lunge.</p><p>
<h4 class="c11">2 "Bottoms Up" Front Squats And Inverted Rows</h4>
</p><p>Instead of starting in the standing position, "bottoms up" squats call for you to start at the bottom of the rep and lift from the squat rack's safety pins. Pause after each rep! This is a great front squat variation to hammer your quads and core, and help you build strength out of the hole.</p><p>After you finish the front squats, leave the bar on the pins and use it to perform a set of inverted rows. The bar will be at a perfect height to allow for full range of motion with no adjustments. It works great from a logistical standpoint.</p><p>In the video below, I use chains on the front squats, which is great if you have chains at your disposal, but they're not essential.</p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/2sgIg3qubEU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p><strong>Use it:</strong> This pairing is an ideal finisher after a heavy bench press or overhead press variation.</p><p>
<h4 class="c11">3 Rack RDL And Split-Stance Row Combo</h4>
</p><p>I recommend doing RDLs and barbell rows from the safety pins of a squat rack. Reset after each rep to take stress off your lower back and encourage proper form. I also recommend doing barbell rows with a split stance to take stress off the lower back, because the split stance helps prevent against lower-back rounding.</p><p>Fortunately, the proper pin height is the same for each exercise, so it works well as a pairing. You'll almost undoubtedly be able to use more weight on RDLs than barbell rows, so you'll need to change the weight, which is a breeze because the bar is raised off the floor. This video below shows how the pair looks in action. I use an oversized trap bar, which is great if you have one, but you can just as easily use a standard barbell.</p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/plwM2jT1FIM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p>If you use a barbell, here is how the rows look.</p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/iOGYG4SKMDo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p><strong>Use it:</strong> This pair goes well after a heavy pressing day.</p><p>
<h4 class="c11">4 Overhead Press And Front Squats</h4>
</p><p>Pairing overhead presses with front squats works well because you don't need to waste time adjusting the bar in the rack. It's set to the same height for each exercise, making this a killer combo.</p><p>I recommend doing the overhead press before the front squats, because after much experimentation, I found that the overhead press doesn't negatively impact the subsequent front squats. Alternatively, if you do the front squats first, the overhead press suffers.</p><p>It's also important to note that most people will be much stronger on front squats than overhead press. This gives you two options: add weight for each set of front squats, or simply do more reps. I usually choose the latter and do twice as many front squats as overhead presses, as I do in this video.</p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/wgpFeuusphc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p><strong>Use it:</strong> This pairing works perfectly as a finisher after doing a heavy chin-up or row variation. It's also ideal as a standalone workout when you're really pinched for time and still want to get a good training effect.</p><h3 class="article-title">Putting It All Together</h3><p>Here's an example of how to utilize these power pairings within a full-body workout program to keep your workouts brief but effective. Shoot to train 2-4 days per week and rotate the workouts as necessary.</p><div class="left-side-stripe" webReader="-5"><p><strong>Workout 1:</strong><br /><strong>A1.</strong> Front Squats: 5 sets of 6 reps<br /><strong>B1.</strong> Ring Dips: 5 sets of 10, 8, 6, 4, and 2 reps<br /><strong>B2.</strong> Chin-Up/Hip Thrust Combo: 5 sets of 10, 8, 6, 4, and 2 reps</p><p><strong>Workout 2:</strong><br /><strong>A1.</strong> Incline Bench Press: 5 sets of 6 reps<br /><strong>B1.</strong> "Bottoms Up" Front Squats: 4 sets of 10 reps<br /><strong>B2.</strong> Inverted Rows: 4 sets of 10 reps</p><p><strong>Workout 3:</strong><br /><strong>A1.</strong> Dumbbell Bench Press: 5 sets of 8 reps<br /><strong>B1.</strong> Rack RDL: 4 sets of 8 reps<br /><strong>B2.</strong> Split-Stance Rack Row: 4 sets of 8 reps</p><p><strong>Workout 4:</strong><br /><strong>A1.</strong> Chin-ups: 5 sets of 6 reps<br /><strong>B1.</strong> Overhead Press: 4 sets of 6 reps<br /><strong>B2.</strong> Front Squats: 4 sets of 12 reps</p></div><br class="c12"/></div><div class="padded-content article-content mod-about-the-author" id="article-about-author" webReader="42.3963133641"><h4 class="article-section-header">About The Author</h4><div class="ata-left-column" webReader="8.50299401198"><div class="ata-author-name"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ben-bruno.html">Ben Bruno</a></div><div class="author-gradient-button"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ben-bruno.html">VIEW AUTHOR PAGE</a></div><p class="ata-author-summary">Ben Bruno graduated Summa Cum Laude from Columbia University. He lives in West Hollywood, California, and trains clients at Rise Movement...</p></div><div class="ata-right-column"><div class="ata-author-image-frame"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ben-bruno.html"><img src="images/2014/writer-ben-bruno-sig-new.jpg" alt=""/></a></div><div class="ata-view-all-articles-link"><ul class="bb-chevron-list bold-type"><li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ben-bruno.html#articles" class="bold-type">View All Articles By This Author</a></li>
</ul></div></div></div>

Power Pairings: Effective Supersets For Strength And Size

As nice as it would be to have unlimited training time, it’s simply not in the cards for most people. The gym is great, but a little thing called life often throws a wrench in your best-laid plans. Realistically, even the most dedicated people can only attend the gym 3-5 days per week for an hour per day, and that’s with a little luck.

The good news is that one hour per session is plenty of time, if you use your time wisely! You just have to be smart with your exercise selection and workout program. Enter “power pairings,” which are specific superset-style exercise pairs I created to help you get the most out of your precious training time.

As with any superset, you perform power pairings without resting between the paired exercises. Take a bench press and chin-up pair, for example. You perform one set of bench press followed immediately by a set of chin-ups. You won’t rest until after you complete both exercises.

Pairing Power

“Full-body workouts are my go-to method when life gets hectic.”

Power pairings can be useful within full-body routines or body-part splits, but for this article I’ll explain how to use them in full-body routines. Full-body workouts are my go-to method when life gets hectic. In a full-body routine, you’d use a power pairing after your primary lift. This allows you to give your first lift maximum attention and strength.

Start your workout with a big-bang strength movement and devote your full energy and attention to it. When you finish your main lift, implement a power pairing as your finisher. Power pairings use one piece of equipment and require little to no setup, which makes them easy to use even in crowded gyms.

Here are four power pairings that you can add to your own training program to cut down on your overall workout time and still get a great training effect!

1 Ring Dip And Chin-Up/Hip Thrust Combo

Pair ring dips with a chin-up/hip thrust combination exercise I created to blast the back, glutes, and hamstrings simultaneously. Rather than confusing you by trying to explain the exercise, here’s a video of what it looks like in action:

From a strength and muscle-building standpoint, this pairing works well because the exercises focus on different body parts, so they won’t negatively impact each other or impair your strength. From a logistical standpoint, it’s a great pair because the ring height is the same for each exercise, which means no necessary adjustments between sets.

To up the ante, try the pairing in a countdown format, as demonstrated in the video. Rather than doing straight sets of each exercise, start by doing decreasing sets of 10, 8, 6, 4, and 2 reps of each exercise with little to no rest between sets. Be warned: This is not for the faint of heart.

Use it: This pair works as a brutal finisher to cap off a great heavy, knee-dominant exercise like the front squat, back squat, split squat, or lunge.

2 “Bottoms Up” Front Squats And Inverted Rows

Instead of starting in the standing position, “bottoms up” squats call for you to start at the bottom of the rep and lift from the squat rack’s safety pins. Pause after each rep! This is a great front squat variation to hammer your quads and core, and help you build strength out of the hole.

After you finish the front squats, leave the bar on the pins and use it to perform a set of inverted rows. The bar will be at a perfect height to allow for full range of motion with no adjustments. It works great from a logistical standpoint.

In the video below, I use chains on the front squats, which is great if you have chains at your disposal, but they’re not essential.

Use it: This pairing is an ideal finisher after a heavy bench press or overhead press variation.

3 Rack RDL And Split-Stance Row Combo

I recommend doing RDLs and barbell rows from the safety pins of a squat rack. Reset after each rep to take stress off your lower back and encourage proper form. I also recommend doing barbell rows with a split stance to take stress off the lower back, because the split stance helps prevent against lower-back rounding.

Fortunately, the proper pin height is the same for each exercise, so it works well as a pairing. You’ll almost undoubtedly be able to use more weight on RDLs than barbell rows, so you’ll need to change the weight, which is a breeze because the bar is raised off the floor. This video below shows how the pair looks in action. I use an oversized trap bar, which is great if you have one, but you can just as easily use a standard barbell.

If you use a barbell, here is how the rows look.

Use it: This pair goes well after a heavy pressing day.

4 Overhead Press And Front Squats

Pairing overhead presses with front squats works well because you don’t need to waste time adjusting the bar in the rack. It’s set to the same height for each exercise, making this a killer combo.

I recommend doing the overhead press before the front squats, because after much experimentation, I found that the overhead press doesn’t negatively impact the subsequent front squats. Alternatively, if you do the front squats first, the overhead press suffers.

It’s also important to note that most people will be much stronger on front squats than overhead press. This gives you two options: add weight for each set of front squats, or simply do more reps. I usually choose the latter and do twice as many front squats as overhead presses, as I do in this video.

Use it: This pairing works perfectly as a finisher after doing a heavy chin-up or row variation. It’s also ideal as a standalone workout when you’re really pinched for time and still want to get a good training effect.

Putting It All Together

Here’s an example of how to utilize these power pairings within a full-body workout program to keep your workouts brief but effective. Shoot to train 2-4 days per week and rotate the workouts as necessary.

Workout 1:
A1. Front Squats: 5 sets of 6 reps
B1. Ring Dips: 5 sets of 10, 8, 6, 4, and 2 reps
B2. Chin-Up/Hip Thrust Combo: 5 sets of 10, 8, 6, 4, and 2 reps

Workout 2:
A1. Incline Bench Press: 5 sets of 6 reps
B1. “Bottoms Up” Front Squats: 4 sets of 10 reps
B2. Inverted Rows: 4 sets of 10 reps

Workout 3:
A1. Dumbbell Bench Press: 5 sets of 8 reps
B1. Rack RDL: 4 sets of 8 reps
B2. Split-Stance Rack Row: 4 sets of 8 reps

Workout 4:
A1. Chin-ups: 5 sets of 6 reps
B1. Overhead Press: 4 sets of 6 reps
B2. Front Squats: 4 sets of 12 reps


About The Author

Ben Bruno graduated Summa Cum Laude from Columbia University. He lives in West Hollywood, California, and trains clients at Rise Movement…

Read more: 

Power Pairings: Effective Supersets For Strength And Size

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, NutritionComments Off on Power Pairings: Effective Supersets For Strength And Size


Paige Hathaway

13 hours 40 minutes ago

More movements that work multiple muscle groups and are bound to make you seriously SWEAT oh yeah.. and feel absolutely amazing!! 🙋🏼💦

KETTLE BELL Squats with curtsey Lunges!! #YIKES 😵 - 10/12 reps in total (every squat is a rep) 4 rounds

Music 🎶 Open Arms by RKCB

Paige Hathaway

1 day 21 hours ago

Add this one to your routine 👆🏼👇🏼
- All you need: 1 heavy kettle bell
Movement combo: DEADLIFT into a upright row into a SQUAT!
- 10 reps x 4 rounds

Music 🎶 Open Arms by RKCB

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