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How to get rid of love handles

Say goodbye to stubborn love handles and uncover those abs with these tips…
Summer’s approaching and it’s around this time of year that everyone gets super body conscious. It’s okay, you’re not alone, love handles and stubborn fat are a problem for practically all of us. So if you want to look and feel great, there’s a lot of things to consider. Whilst diet and exercise are two powerful tools in the pursuit of a healthy body, sleep patterns, stress levels and body confidence all have their own part to play. Learn how to make the most of what you’ve got (and disguise those love handles) with our top expert tips.

Eat up, slim down
Always thinking about your next meal? Not anymore! The secret behind fat-loss success lies in properly fuelling your body with nutrient-dense food. Number one on the list is fibre – both the soluble and insoluble types. Fibre helps slow down digestion and recharges your body with a steady stream of energy, but worryingly, a whopping 90 percent of us don’t have enough roughage in our diets, according to a new study by Warburtons.
To win the war against wobbles, it’s important to go back to basics. Eat meals high in protein, which helps preserve lean muscle mass and omega-3 fatty acids. These turn on fat-burning enzymes in your cells and help regulate the appetite hormone leptin, which keeps you feeling satiated. Finally, spice up your meals for the ultimate metabolism kick. Chilli and paprika both contain a compound called capsaicin that helps speed up weight loss, while cinnamon helps regulate blood sugar levels and reduce cravings.
Fight fat: Government guidelines say we should consume 24g of fibre daily, so fill your plate with a variety of colourful fruit, veg and whole grains to ensure you reach your quota. Boost your omega-3 intake with nuts and fish such as sardines, salmon and mackerel, and add chilli, paprika and cinnamon to soups, stews and curries.

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Sleep easy, stay slim
The secret to maintaining your slim figure? A good night’s sleep! The link between sleep and staying slim is often underestimated, but you can double your chances of reaching your ideal weight if you get between six and eight hours sleep a night. ‘One third of the population of the UK is sleep deprived and this puts people at an increased risk of being overweight,’ says naturopath Sybille Gebhardt (sybille.co.uk). ‘Your body derives its energy from food and sleep. If one is lacking, then the other needs to increase to sustain your body’s necessary energy levels.’
A recent study by researchers at the University of Chicago found that sleep deprivation plays havoc with fat cells, reducing their ability to respond to the blood sugar balancing hormone insulin by 30 per cent.
Ever wondered why a bad night’s sleep leads to a day of bingeing? Lack of sleep also lowers levels of the appetite-controlling hormone leptin, sending signals to the brain to increase appetite. When you get enough sleep, leptin levels are higher – so you’re more likely to feel full when you eat.
Fight fat: Make sure you get a proper night’s rest by going to bed at the same time each night to help regulate your body’s circadian rhythm. Apply a spritz of lavender essential oil to your pillow and enjoy a soak in the tub before lights out to increase your chances of shut-eye.

Beat stress, lose weight
Being dedicated to your job may improve your career prospects, but it might not be such good news for your waistline. Even if you eat healthily and exercise regularly, leading a stressful lifestyle can stop you from losing inches. When you’re under stress, your body pumps out adrenaline and high levels of the hormone cortisol. Cortisol affects appetite, causing you to crave sugary, high-fat foods that stimulate the brain to release neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine. This has a soothing effect on stress, but, obviously, it’s terrible news for your body. A high level of cortisol also promotes fat around your middle, known as visceral fat. This fat surrounds organs and releases fatty acids into your blood stream, raising insulin levels and increasing your risk of diabetes over the long term. ‘Many of us reach for food when we’re stressed,’ says Sybille. ‘Try meditation or yoga to calm your mind.’
Fight fat: Melt your muffin top with stress-soothing foods such as oily fish, which helps to regulate cortisol levels, or turkey, which increases serotonin levels. Practice yoga at least twice a week.

Feel confident, look great
Your biggest fat-loss obstacle? You’re looking at her in the mirror! Looking good is all about feeling good, so if you boost your body confidence you could send your fat-loss rate soaring. A study by scientists at the Technical University of Lisbon and Bangor University discovered that women are far more likely to shed pounds if they work on improving their body image issues. You might not have your dream body (yet), but embrace your best bits and you’ll look and feel your best.
Fight fat: Been blessed with long legs but a paunchy tum? Opt for skinny jeans with a smock top and a wow-inducing pair of heels. Hate your bingo wings but love your killer cleavage? A long-sleeved top with a scoop neckline will give you a lift.

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How to get rid of love handles

Posted in Bodybuilding, Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight lossComments Off on How to get rid of love handles

<div id="DPG" webReader="162.790055249"><p>Powerlifting, like baseball and various racing sports, often seems to be more about numbers than people. Competitor X pulled or pushed X pounds at X bodyweight, or totaled X to break the previous record X. Great—but who is this human hoist moving all those pounds?</p><p>Universal Nutrition recently used the 2013 CAPO Powerlifting Nationals in Hobart, Tasmania, as the opportunity to shine a personal light on five of the world's elite strength competitors, in a unique online documentary series titled "The Road to CAPO."</p><p>The athletes run the gamut in size, from 300-pound <a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/kentuckysquat/">Brandon Lilly</a> to Richard Hawthorne at less than half that weight. They come from equally diverse backgrounds and professions. What they all shared was the potential to leave Australia as the strongest pound-for-pound lifter in the world on that day.</p><h3 class="article-title">The Road to Capo, Conclusion<br /><span class="exercise-note">Watch The Video - 24:02</span></h3><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Av3vgpA2zyA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p>Barring such a singular achievement, they all were threats to add a new world record to their resumes, because powerlifting, unlike baseball, is a sport where no stat is sacred. New lifters set incredible new standards of strength on a regular basis, and in Hobart, every member of the team had a benchmark in his sights.</p><p>Got a half-hour? Watch this dramatic video of the meet. If you have a few minutes to spare, watch the short video features on the athletes. Either way, you're likely to end up with a new appreciation for what happens both on the platform and on the road leading to it.</p><h3 class="article-title">Eric Lilliebridge: </h3><p>It would be easy to call Eric Lilliebridge a powerlifting prodigy, but the label doesn't quite do justice to the depth of experience he has accumulated in just 23 years. Eric, his father Ernie, Sr., and his brother Ernie, Jr., all accomplished pro powerlifters and <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/univ/univ.htm">Animal athletes</a>, constitute three stout branches on what must be the world's strongest family tree.</p><p>Young Eric asked his father to coach him beginning at age 13, and by 18, the baby of the family could deadlift 800 pounds and had systematically climbed to the upper echelon of the sport. His accomplishments have only grown since then. He has set multiple world records including a 903-pound raw squat in a competition last November. On his very next lift, he increased his own record by an additional 22 pounds.</p><img src="images/2014/down-under-the-bar-2.jpg" width="560" height="317"/><p>Eric Lilliebridge is the toast of the 275 weight class at age 23, with multiple squat records already to his name.</p><p>In his chapter of The Road to CAPO, "<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=se7PYe0XPeE" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Bonds that Hold</a>," Eric and his filial training partners open the door into what it's like to lift and train as a family. They also visit the hard Chicago neighborhood where Eric and his brother grew up—and where spotting one another was a question of life and death.</p><h3 class="article-title">Garrett Griffin: </h3><p>Garrett "Gunz" Griffin was strong long before he was a strength competitor. One fateful day, he had casually bench-pressed almost two and a half times his bodyweight in a gym in his hometown in Louisiana, when a bystander mentioned a local bench press contest with a $1,000 prize.</p><p>"I really didn't put too much into it. I just showed up at the competition," Griffin recalls. "There were like 17 powerlifters there with their big gym bags and all their equipment. I just walked in: Me, myself, and nothin'." He left with the money after pressing 440 pounds at a bodyweight of 188 pounds.</p><p>That was in 2010, and in the ensuing years, the powerlifting newcomer has quickly established himself as one of the world's top raw benchers, getting comfortable in the rarified air of 500-pound benches. In "<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L8F4I7dvZIg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Weight of Expecations</a>." Griffin tours the bayou where he and his family have persevered and gotten stronger in the years following Hurricane Katrina.</p><img src="images/2014/down-under-the-bar-3.jpg" width="560" height="360"/><p>5-foot-4 Richard Hawthorne played defensive back in college. "They couldn't see me, but you best believe they felt me," he says of his opponents.</p><h3 class="article-title">Richard Hawthorne: </h3><p>If you've ever seen Richard Hawthorne lift you probably remember it, even if you didn't know his name at the time. It's not often that you see a 5-foot-4, 130-pound man lift nearly five times his bodyweight off of the ground.</p><p>Hawthorne has made enough of a habit of doing this, both in competition and in exhibitions like the Animal Cage at the Arnold Classic, that he has earned the nickname "The Ant." Pound-for-pound, he's as strong as they come, which Hawthorne attributes to his dedication to building three specific types of strength: abdominal strength, strong technique, and mental resolve.</p><p>"Just because you're made a certain way don't mean you have any kind of limits. You can do anything you want. It's a mental thing," Hawthorne says in his feature, "<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2TG79FmMyUE" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">No Limits</a>." "When I lift, people see the intensity. I don't say much, I don't yell, or do all that much, but they can see it."</p><h3 class="article-title">Sam Byrd: </h3><p><a href="http://contest.bodybuilding.com/bio/358252/">Sam Byrd</a> is a classic "powerbuilder," the type who makes unthinkable poundage look puny while maintaining a level of conditioning that could earn him a bodybuilding trophy any day of the week. But the longtime competitor is best known best as one of the all-time greats in the squat. He holds records in both raw and equipped lifting, and admits that CAPO presented a special opportunity to add to his legend. "Of course I have numbers in my head," he says, "but I want to do my speaking on the platform."</p><p>Fortunately, Byrd is more willing in his feature to speak openly about his goals in life, as well as his ambitious and tireless approach to goal-setting. In "<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L8F4I7dvZIg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Unattainable</a>," he explains how he has progressed from one seemingly unreachable goal to another, and how his role as a world-class powerlifter and ambassador of the sport intersects with life as a practicing attorney.</p><img src="images/2014/down-under-the-bar-1.jpg" width="560" height="373"/><p>Can your attorney squat 900 pounds? Sam Byrd can.</p><h3 class="article-title">Brandon Lilly: </h3><p>"I hated the weight room," <a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/kentuckysquat/">Brandon Lilly</a> admits. And with good reason: His initial experiences in his middle school gym class were utterly humiliating, leaving him flat on his back with his peers watching all around. But he came back, and kept coming back, until he eventually built a kinship with the iron that allowed Lilly to thrive as a powerlifter and strongman. He also helped bring a number of other strong lifters to new competitive heights along with him as the creator of the Cube Method of powerlifting training.</p><p>In "<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qrp4a-LBGdc" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">From Nothing</a>," the burly, bearded Kentucky native gives his frank appraisal of the challenge of finding motivation over a long career, and how he balances thankfulness and intensity in the heat of competition. At CAPO, he would have his best opportunity yet to see how his philosophy prepared him to face global competition.</p><br /><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/univ/univ.htm"><img src="images/2013/animal-banner.jpg" width="560" height="144"/></a><br class="c11"/></div>

Down Under The Bar: The Road To The CAPO Powerlifting Nationals

Powerlifting, like baseball and various racing sports, often seems to be more about numbers than people. Competitor X pulled or pushed X pounds at X bodyweight, or totaled X to break the previous record X. Great—but who is this human hoist moving all those pounds?

Universal Nutrition recently used the 2013 CAPO Powerlifting Nationals in Hobart, Tasmania, as the opportunity to shine a personal light on five of the world’s elite strength competitors, in a unique online documentary series titled “The Road to CAPO.”

The athletes run the gamut in size, from 300-pound Brandon Lilly to Richard Hawthorne at less than half that weight. They come from equally diverse backgrounds and professions. What they all shared was the potential to leave Australia as the strongest pound-for-pound lifter in the world on that day.

The Road to Capo, Conclusion
Watch The Video – 24:02

Barring such a singular achievement, they all were threats to add a new world record to their resumes, because powerlifting, unlike baseball, is a sport where no stat is sacred. New lifters set incredible new standards of strength on a regular basis, and in Hobart, every member of the team had a benchmark in his sights.

Got a half-hour? Watch this dramatic video of the meet. If you have a few minutes to spare, watch the short video features on the athletes. Either way, you’re likely to end up with a new appreciation for what happens both on the platform and on the road leading to it.

Eric Lilliebridge:

It would be easy to call Eric Lilliebridge a powerlifting prodigy, but the label doesn’t quite do justice to the depth of experience he has accumulated in just 23 years. Eric, his father Ernie, Sr., and his brother Ernie, Jr., all accomplished pro powerlifters and Animal athletes, constitute three stout branches on what must be the world’s strongest family tree.

Young Eric asked his father to coach him beginning at age 13, and by 18, the baby of the family could deadlift 800 pounds and had systematically climbed to the upper echelon of the sport. His accomplishments have only grown since then. He has set multiple world records including a 903-pound raw squat in a competition last November. On his very next lift, he increased his own record by an additional 22 pounds.

Eric Lilliebridge is the toast of the 275 weight class at age 23, with multiple squat records already to his name.

In his chapter of The Road to CAPO, “The Bonds that Hold,” Eric and his filial training partners open the door into what it’s like to lift and train as a family. They also visit the hard Chicago neighborhood where Eric and his brother grew up—and where spotting one another was a question of life and death.

Garrett Griffin:

Garrett “Gunz” Griffin was strong long before he was a strength competitor. One fateful day, he had casually bench-pressed almost two and a half times his bodyweight in a gym in his hometown in Louisiana, when a bystander mentioned a local bench press contest with a $1,000 prize.

“I really didn’t put too much into it. I just showed up at the competition,” Griffin recalls. “There were like 17 powerlifters there with their big gym bags and all their equipment. I just walked in: Me, myself, and nothin’.” He left with the money after pressing 440 pounds at a bodyweight of 188 pounds.

That was in 2010, and in the ensuing years, the powerlifting newcomer has quickly established himself as one of the world’s top raw benchers, getting comfortable in the rarified air of 500-pound benches. In “The Weight of Expecations.” Griffin tours the bayou where he and his family have persevered and gotten stronger in the years following Hurricane Katrina.

5-foot-4 Richard Hawthorne played defensive back in college. “They couldn’t see me, but you best believe they felt me,” he says of his opponents.

Richard Hawthorne:

If you’ve ever seen Richard Hawthorne lift you probably remember it, even if you didn’t know his name at the time. It’s not often that you see a 5-foot-4, 130-pound man lift nearly five times his bodyweight off of the ground.

Hawthorne has made enough of a habit of doing this, both in competition and in exhibitions like the Animal Cage at the Arnold Classic, that he has earned the nickname “The Ant.” Pound-for-pound, he’s as strong as they come, which Hawthorne attributes to his dedication to building three specific types of strength: abdominal strength, strong technique, and mental resolve.

“Just because you’re made a certain way don’t mean you have any kind of limits. You can do anything you want. It’s a mental thing,” Hawthorne says in his feature, “No Limits.” “When I lift, people see the intensity. I don’t say much, I don’t yell, or do all that much, but they can see it.”

Sam Byrd:

Sam Byrd is a classic “powerbuilder,” the type who makes unthinkable poundage look puny while maintaining a level of conditioning that could earn him a bodybuilding trophy any day of the week. But the longtime competitor is best known best as one of the all-time greats in the squat. He holds records in both raw and equipped lifting, and admits that CAPO presented a special opportunity to add to his legend. “Of course I have numbers in my head,” he says, “but I want to do my speaking on the platform.”

Fortunately, Byrd is more willing in his feature to speak openly about his goals in life, as well as his ambitious and tireless approach to goal-setting. In “Unattainable,” he explains how he has progressed from one seemingly unreachable goal to another, and how his role as a world-class powerlifter and ambassador of the sport intersects with life as a practicing attorney.

Can your attorney squat 900 pounds? Sam Byrd can.

Brandon Lilly:

“I hated the weight room,” Brandon Lilly admits. And with good reason: His initial experiences in his middle school gym class were utterly humiliating, leaving him flat on his back with his peers watching all around. But he came back, and kept coming back, until he eventually built a kinship with the iron that allowed Lilly to thrive as a powerlifter and strongman. He also helped bring a number of other strong lifters to new competitive heights along with him as the creator of the Cube Method of powerlifting training.

In “From Nothing,” the burly, bearded Kentucky native gives his frank appraisal of the challenge of finding motivation over a long career, and how he balances thankfulness and intensity in the heat of competition. At CAPO, he would have his best opportunity yet to see how his philosophy prepared him to face global competition.


Originally from:

Down Under The Bar: The Road To The CAPO Powerlifting Nationals

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, UncategorizedComments Off on Down Under The Bar: The Road To The CAPO Powerlifting Nationals


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