Tag Archive | "children"

collette mcshane

5 minutes with The HIIT Mum

Pocket rocket and mother-of-one Colette McShane, aka. @TheHIITMum, is a fitness force to be reckoned with. Here, we chat to her about supplementation, passion and just getting stuff done.

I love helping others achieve good health because there is nothing more satisfying than seeing people achieve what they never thought possible. I love making a difference in people’s lives – a lot of parents write to me to say they are getting fitter and healthier, making it easier for them to play with their children.

I always kick the day off with a big, healthy breakfast as it sets the tone for the rest of my day. I make a yummy omelette, frittata or poached eggs with lots of vegetables. Lunch and dinner is anything from stirfry to healthy curries or Mexican-style wraps – again, with lots of vegies and lean proteins.

I snack on the Healthy Way range from Chemist Warehouse, as it’s accessible, varied and forever expanding. I love their vegie chips, all their nuts (I am walnut and almond crazy) and the trail mixes for snacking during the day. 

Continued here:

5 minutes with The HIIT Mum

Posted in Nutrition, Weight lossComments Off on 5 minutes with The HIIT Mum

How to fit running into your busy schedule

Life’s unexpected curveballs can easily scupper your training plans. In fact, research shows one-in-five Brits
blame lack of time (and lethargy!) for not exercising at all. We’ve asked a panel of experts how you can stay on top of your goals when life is crying out for you to let them slide.

The Hurdle: Family Commitments

If you’re struggling to squeeze a run into your busy family life, it’s time to think outside of the box.

Train Together

Data from Bupa shows
that running mums spend more quality time with their children. And not only that, 65 per cent of running mums find it easier to juggle everyday tasks compared to 43 per cent of non-active mums. ‘Use family as a positive by getting your partner or children involved, and encouraging them to train together,’ suggests Tom Coates, personal trainer at PureGym.

Book in Runs

Research in the Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology shows people who diarise their training sessions are more likely to stick to their programme. ‘Those of us who record runs tend to exercise more frequently than those who don’t, so are far more likely to see results,’ says Dean Hodgkin, personal trainer at Ragdale Hall.

Run to School

Ditch the car
and encourage your children to get fit by scooting or cycling to school. ‘That way you can run alongside them at a leisurely pace (or faster if you’re running late) and then run back home, too,’ adds Alison Beadle, pre- and post-natal fitness author at livewellbhappy.co.uk.

Buddy Up

A recent poll by the British Heart Foundation confirms that women would rather run as part of a group, with almost half confirming that group running is preferable to jogging alone. ‘Consider joining a mummy running club, in which people run with buggies,’ suggests Beadle.

The Hurdle: A Demanding Job

Don’t let your job define your fitness levels. With these nifty notions, you’ll clock that training session, whatever the agenda.

Club Together

Two-thirds of British workers take less than 20 minutes for lunch. Not only is this not good for your health, but it’s also bad for your productivity. ‘Running in your lunch hour provides a change of scenery from the office that can help you de-stress and re-focus,’ points out Brook Fenton, Proskins running expert.

Run To Work

Try running to and from work. Park the car a few miles away from work or get off the train a stop earlier and run into the office. Not only will you save money and keep fit, but research from the University of East Anglia shows that active commuters are better able to concentrate than workers who travel by car.

Train Fast

Even if you’re training for an endurance race, speed sessions are worthwhile workouts, too. ‘With interval training, it’s easy to fit in a shorter run if need be,’ says Coates. Try squeezing in a run by doing three lots of one-, two- and three-minute efforts, with 30 seconds’ recovery between intervals.

Stick Up Reminders

If you’re still struggling to swap work
for miles, try hanging a medal from your computer says Hodgkin. ‘Even keeping a spare pair of trainers in the back of your car, so that you see them every time you open the boot, can be quite persuasive.’

The Hurdle: A Busy Social Life

One of the benefits of running is that it’s a solo sport but swapping days out for miles on the road can be a bit lonely.

Get ’Appy

Running doesn’t have to be a lonely activity. Social training apps such as Sprinter, Garmin Connect or Strava are a fantastic way to connect with other runners. ‘With 100,000 new members signing up to Strava each week, athletes of all abilities are joining the community so that they can track and compare their activities to help motivate them,’ explains Gareth Nettleton, director of international marketing at Strava.

Run with Friends

Far from detaching you from your social group, running could be a great way to bring you together. ‘Research shows that training with a friend leads to greater adherence to your workout schedule,’ explains Hodgkin.

Rise Early

If you’re finding it difficult to balance weekend runs with social events, get into the habit of running before the day starts. ‘Waking up earlier for a
run is tough at first but, by training in the morning, you’re giving yourself the rest
of the day for other commitments – not
to mention starting the day in a positive way,’ says Coates.

Read article here:

How to fit running into your busy schedule

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight lossComments Off on How to fit running into your busy schedule

<div id="DPG" webReader="155.218070444"><p>
<h3 class="article-title">Q "I used to lift heavy and crush cardio, but I got in a car wreck last year and have been on a downward motivational slump ever since. Any suggestions?"</h3>
</p><div class="side-bar c12" webReader="-18.7883211679"><div class="c10"><img src="images/2013/james-grage-vital-stats.jpg"/></div><h3 class="article-title c11">Vital Stats</h3><p><strong>Name:</strong> James Grage<br /><strong>BodySpace:</strong> <a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/JamesGrage/">JamesGrage</a><br /><strong>Height:</strong> 5-foot-10<br /><strong>Weight:</strong> 175 lbs<br /><strong>Occupation:</strong> Co-Founder and Vice President of <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/bpisports/bpisports.htm" target="_blank">BPI Sports</a></p></div><p>An injury is one of the easiest ways to derail your fitness goals. It's about as good of a reason—or excuse—for not pursuing your goal as any. In fact, it's better.</p><p>When you're injured, people will hesitate to push you or tell you to man up. They're more likely to baby you and feed into your sense of self pity.</p><p>That's when you need to make the decision to pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and hit the gym even harder than before.</p><p>First, you need a plan of attack. Follow the tips below to rebuild a solid foundation and regain the strength you need to hit the gym, hard.</p><h3 class="article-title">Tip 1 </h3><p>Ditch the 'Woe Is Me' attitude. I know this might sound harsh but, when you're looking to get back on the horse (or the weight machine), you're going to have to break free from self-pity. No one can help if you're the one holding yourself back. And, believe me, I know how hard it can be to separate yourself from what's happened.</p><p>When people learn of <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/fate-fitness-and-fortitude-the-james-grage-story.html">the horrible accident I was in</a>, they can hardly believe it. They seem amazed that I was able to build myself back up, despite all of my injuries. Trust me, I understand the feeling of a task being so insurmountable that it leaves you downright depressed. I know what it's like for that light at the end of the tunnel to be a mere flicker.</p><p>The key to breaking free is seeing a bigger picture.</p><img src="images/2014/how-can-i-stay-on-track-after-injury-graphic-1.jpg" width="560" height="326"/><p>"When people learn of the horrible accident I was in, they can hardly believe it."</p><p>One day, when I had sunken into a pit of self-wallowing, a nurse told me about a man in the next room who'd been there for month. For him, day-to-day tasks that we all take for granted would never be the same again. He was never going to be able to brush his teeth or wash his hair. Yet here I was complaining about having to learn to walk again. At least I could walk.</p><p>The easiest thing to do to gain perspective is to watch and listen to other people's stories. Go on YouTube or check out charities like <a href="http://www.shrinershospitalsforchildren.org/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Shriner's Hospital for Children</a>. When you see a child with amputated legs playing basketball, wrestling for his high school, or riding his skateboard, you may well start to change your tune.</p><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/bpi-sports/whey-hd.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/bpi-sports_whey-hd_ratingbanner_01.jpg" width="401" height="167" class="c14"/></a><a href="http://reviews.bodybuilding.com/BPI_Sports/WheyHD"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/bpi-sports_whey-hd_ratingbanner_02.jpg" width="159" height="96"/></a><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/bpi-sports/whey-hd.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/bpi-sports_whey-hd_ratingbanner_03.jpg" width="159" height="71"/></a><h3 class="article-title">Tip 2 </h3><p>Attitude is a choice. You can either choose to dwell on an injury and let it become part of your identity, or you can treat it as a mere setback—and let your triumph over that setback become part of your identity instead.</p><p>For me it was tough. My <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/fate-fitness-and-fortitude-the-james-grage-story.html">first week in the hospital</a> was filled with days of self-pity and alienation. The road to recovery seemed so bleak. Fitness had been a cornerstone of my identity, and I was physically broken.</p><p>For me, moving on meant realizing that the past was the past, that my path had changed. Instead of mourning what was lost, I celebrated the new opportunities that lay before me.</p><h3 class="article-title">Tip 3 </h3><img src="images/2014/how-can-i-stay-on-track-after-injury-graphic-2.jpg" width="280" height="534" border="0" class="right-image"/><p>"When I decided to start running again, I didn't start by lacing up my sneakers and hitting the trail."</p><p>"Can't" has no place in my vocabulary. One of my favorite quotes is an old one by Henry Ford that says: "Whether you think you can or can't, you're right." In the end, it's all about choice:</p><ul class="dpg-list"><li>Do you want to do something about your predicament?</li>
<li>Do you want to embrace the challenge and move on, or do you want to lean on it as a limitation?</li>
</ul><p>After an injury, it's not about what you can't do; it's about doing things in new ways, if necessary. After my accident, running became painful—no, excruciating.</p><p>Every time I tried it, I thought, "<em>That was dumb. I shouldn't have done that. I should have known my limitations</em>." But, the truth is, I could run. I just needed to learn how to take progressive steps instead of jumping right in.</p><p>When I decided to start running again, I didn't start by lacing up my sneakers and hitting the trail. Instead, I started by going to physical therapy, taking supplements for joint and scar tissue health, and foam rolling. This prep work was necessary.</p><p>The same effort you put forth toward a fitness program, or the commitment you display to a nutrition plan, is also needed for overcoming an injury. Discipline is the key.</p><h3 class="article-title">Tip 4 </h3><p>Setting a goal helps you have a good reason to get up and at 'em.</p><p>In December 2014, I decided to run a timed mile to raise money for Shriner's Hospital For Children. Now, I'm motivated and train daily. After 15 years of not running, my goal is to finish in less than six minutes.</p><p>I've got all the reasons in the world why I shouldn't be able to accomplish it. But I'm motivated. If you find a good-enough reason, you'll be committed to doing whatever it takes to achieve it.</p><p>Find your inner warrior and look for that next challenge; relish going up against adversity. I challenge you to find that inner warrior, overcome your hurdle, and battle back.</p><h3 class="article-title">Tip 5 </h3><p>When I decided to jump back on the fitness bandwagon after my accident, I created a plan. If I needed help, I called on people who I knew could assist me. A friend who's a former Olympic athlete put together a running program for me. Doctor friends suggested physical therapy exercises. With their help, I put together a whole regimen.</p><img src="images/2014/how-can-i-stay-on-track-after-injury-graphic-3.jpg" width="560" height="374"/><p>Instead of being discouraged that you couldn't follow the same exact plan you were following before your injury, regroup. Create a new plan for yourself.</p><p>Instead of being discouraged that you couldn't follow the same exact plan you were following before your injury, regroup. Create a new plan for yourself. Work around the injury. Life happens, and sometimes you must adjust.</p><p>Nobody wants to suffer an injury, but injuries have a strange way of showing us what we're made of. Take the right approach, and you'll emerge a better, stronger person.</p><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/bpi-sports/1mr-vortex.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/bpr-1mr-vortex_01.jpg" width="402" height="167" class="c14"/></a><a href="http://reviews.bodybuilding.com/BPI_Sports/1MR_Vortex"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/bpr-1mr-vortex_02.jpg" width="158" height="97"/></a><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/bpi-sports/1mr-vortex.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/bpr-1mr-vortex_03.jpg" width="158" height="70"/></a><br /><h4>Recommended For You</h4><div class="c18" webReader="5.94026548673"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ask-the-master-motivator-how-can-i-stay-pumped-for-late-workout.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/ask-the-master-motivator-james-grage-smallbox-bpi.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c17" webReader="7.9203539823"><h4 class="c16"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ask-the-master-motivator-how-can-i-stay-pumped-for-late-workout.html">How Can I Stay Pumped For A Late-Night Workout?</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
With all the things that come up in a day, evening workouts can sometimes get lost in the mix. Learn how to stay on track and push through any workout, no matter the time of day.</p></div></div><div class="c18" webReader="4.81725888325"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/fate-fitness-and-fortitude-the-james-grage-story.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/fate-fitness-and-fortitude-smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c17" webReader="5.92893401015"><h4 class="c16"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/fate-fitness-and-fortitude-the-james-grage-story.html">Fate, Fitness, And Fortitude: The James Grage Story</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
BPI Sports co-founder James Grage survived a devastating car crash and rebuilt a competition-worthy physique against all odds. This is his story.</p></div></div><div class="c18" webReader="6.41935483871"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/fitness-360-james-grage-define-your-own-destiny.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/fit-360-james-grage-smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c17" webReader="8.82661290323"><h4 class="c16"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/fitness-360-james-grage-define-your-own-destiny.html">Fitness 360: James Grage, Define Your Own Destiny</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
He asked for a Jack LaLanne weight set at age 15, stepped on stage at 25, and built himself back up after a devastating car accident that very same year. At age 39, James Grage refuses to slow down.</p></div></div><br class="c19"/></div><div class="padded-content article-content mod-about-the-author" id="article-about-author" webReader="33.1219512195"><h4 class="article-section-header">About The Author</h4><div class="ata-left-column" webReader="4.85087719298"><div class="ata-author-name"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/other.htm">Contributing Writer</a></div><div class="author-gradient-button"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/other.htm">VIEW AUTHOR PAGE</a></div><p class="ata-author-summary">Check out these awesome articles by some of the best writers in the industry.</p></div><div class="ata-right-column"><div class="ata-author-image-frame"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/other.htm"><img src="images/2013/writer-contributing-writers-sig-new.jpg" alt=""/></a></div><div class="ata-view-all-articles-link"><ul class="bb-chevron-list bold-type"><li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/other.htm#articles" class="bold-type">View All Articles By This Author</a></li>
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Ask The Master Motivator: How Can I Stay On Track After An Injury?

Q “I used to lift heavy and crush cardio, but I got in a car wreck last year and have been on a downward motivational slump ever since. Any suggestions?”

An injury is one of the easiest ways to derail your fitness goals. It’s about as good of a reason—or excuse—for not pursuing your goal as any. In fact, it’s better.

When you’re injured, people will hesitate to push you or tell you to man up. They’re more likely to baby you and feed into your sense of self pity.

That’s when you need to make the decision to pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and hit the gym even harder than before.

First, you need a plan of attack. Follow the tips below to rebuild a solid foundation and regain the strength you need to hit the gym, hard.

Tip 1

Ditch the ‘Woe Is Me’ attitude. I know this might sound harsh but, when you’re looking to get back on the horse (or the weight machine), you’re going to have to break free from self-pity. No one can help if you’re the one holding yourself back. And, believe me, I know how hard it can be to separate yourself from what’s happened.

When people learn of the horrible accident I was in, they can hardly believe it. They seem amazed that I was able to build myself back up, despite all of my injuries. Trust me, I understand the feeling of a task being so insurmountable that it leaves you downright depressed. I know what it’s like for that light at the end of the tunnel to be a mere flicker.

The key to breaking free is seeing a bigger picture.

“When people learn of the horrible accident I was in, they can hardly believe it.”

One day, when I had sunken into a pit of self-wallowing, a nurse told me about a man in the next room who’d been there for month. For him, day-to-day tasks that we all take for granted would never be the same again. He was never going to be able to brush his teeth or wash his hair. Yet here I was complaining about having to learn to walk again. At least I could walk.

The easiest thing to do to gain perspective is to watch and listen to other people’s stories. Go on YouTube or check out charities like Shriner’s Hospital for Children. When you see a child with amputated legs playing basketball, wrestling for his high school, or riding his skateboard, you may well start to change your tune.

Tip 2

Attitude is a choice. You can either choose to dwell on an injury and let it become part of your identity, or you can treat it as a mere setback—and let your triumph over that setback become part of your identity instead.

For me it was tough. My first week in the hospital was filled with days of self-pity and alienation. The road to recovery seemed so bleak. Fitness had been a cornerstone of my identity, and I was physically broken.

For me, moving on meant realizing that the past was the past, that my path had changed. Instead of mourning what was lost, I celebrated the new opportunities that lay before me.

Tip 3

“When I decided to start running again, I didn’t start by lacing up my sneakers and hitting the trail.”

“Can’t” has no place in my vocabulary. One of my favorite quotes is an old one by Henry Ford that says: “Whether you think you can or can’t, you’re right.” In the end, it’s all about choice:

  • Do you want to do something about your predicament?
  • Do you want to embrace the challenge and move on, or do you want to lean on it as a limitation?

After an injury, it’s not about what you can’t do; it’s about doing things in new ways, if necessary. After my accident, running became painful—no, excruciating.

Every time I tried it, I thought, “That was dumb. I shouldn’t have done that. I should have known my limitations.” But, the truth is, I could run. I just needed to learn how to take progressive steps instead of jumping right in.

When I decided to start running again, I didn’t start by lacing up my sneakers and hitting the trail. Instead, I started by going to physical therapy, taking supplements for joint and scar tissue health, and foam rolling. This prep work was necessary.

The same effort you put forth toward a fitness program, or the commitment you display to a nutrition plan, is also needed for overcoming an injury. Discipline is the key.

Tip 4

Setting a goal helps you have a good reason to get up and at ’em.

In December 2014, I decided to run a timed mile to raise money for Shriner’s Hospital For Children. Now, I’m motivated and train daily. After 15 years of not running, my goal is to finish in less than six minutes.

I’ve got all the reasons in the world why I shouldn’t be able to accomplish it. But I’m motivated. If you find a good-enough reason, you’ll be committed to doing whatever it takes to achieve it.

Find your inner warrior and look for that next challenge; relish going up against adversity. I challenge you to find that inner warrior, overcome your hurdle, and battle back.

Tip 5

When I decided to jump back on the fitness bandwagon after my accident, I created a plan. If I needed help, I called on people who I knew could assist me. A friend who’s a former Olympic athlete put together a running program for me. Doctor friends suggested physical therapy exercises. With their help, I put together a whole regimen.

Instead of being discouraged that you couldn’t follow the same exact plan you were following before your injury, regroup. Create a new plan for yourself.

Instead of being discouraged that you couldn’t follow the same exact plan you were following before your injury, regroup. Create a new plan for yourself. Work around the injury. Life happens, and sometimes you must adjust.

Nobody wants to suffer an injury, but injuries have a strange way of showing us what we’re made of. Take the right approach, and you’ll emerge a better, stronger person.

Recommended For You

How Can I Stay Pumped For A Late-Night Workout?

With all the things that come up in a day, evening workouts can sometimes get lost in the mix. Learn how to stay on track and push through any workout, no matter the time of day.

Fate, Fitness, And Fortitude: The James Grage Story

BPI Sports co-founder James Grage survived a devastating car crash and rebuilt a competition-worthy physique against all odds. This is his story.

Fitness 360: James Grage, Define Your Own Destiny

He asked for a Jack LaLanne weight set at age 15, stepped on stage at 25, and built himself back up after a devastating car accident that very same year. At age 39, James Grage refuses to slow down.


About The Author

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Ask The Master Motivator: How Can I Stay On Track After An Injury?

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, NutritionComments Off on Ask The Master Motivator: How Can I Stay On Track After An Injury?


Paige Hathaway

32 minutes 48 seconds ago

There is a place within you where nothing is impossible. Here lie the seeds of all your ideas, dreams and creations. From this place you have the power and the ability to attract what you focus on. From this place you can do anything.
SEE IT... FEEL IT... BECOME IT.
- TAG SOMEONE YOU WANT TO MOTIVATE 😤-

Paige Hathaway

7 hours 32 minutes ago

Type your current location 📍
I'm currently in California driving to the gym. 🏎💨💪🏼

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