Tag Archive | "diet"

Image bianca.jpg

Fitness model healthy food swaps

Fitness website founder and model  //  Sporteluxe.com and biancacheah.com.au

“I eat a high-protein, low-carb diet. I don’t eat dairy foods like milk, cheese and yoghurt. Chicken and fish are my top protein picks and with them I always eat plenty of fresh vegetables – particularly the vegies in season as they are grown more naturally. I eat very little sugar and minimise intake of carbs as they make me feel bloated and lethargic.

I avoid processed foods, which really make me feel hungover. Vegies are on high rotation in my diet; the fresher the meal, the better I feel. I feel good knowing I’ve nourished my body with a huge vitamin boost, but I also believe it’s really important to allow yourself treats in moderation, otherwise abstaining can lead to binge eating. I like to snack on chocolate-covered goji berries, which are full of antioxidants.”

Cow’s milk 

»

Lactose-free almond or soy milk

Green vegies 

»

Green juices (broccoli, broccolini, spinach, cucumber)

Sugar 

»

Honey

Dried fruit  

»

Fresh fruit

White carbs 

»

Quinoa, brown rice, sweet potato

Bland food 

»

Flavoursome food (spices)

Fruit juices

»

Water

Wine

»

Biodynamic and organic red wine

Pasta

»

Steamed broccolini

Milk chocolate

»

Chocolate-covered goji berries

 

Sophie Guidolin

sophie

fitness blogger  //  sophieguidolin.com.au

“I overhauled most of my habits, which meant I cut back on sugar, reduced my intake of carbs, started avoiding processed foods, reduced my intake of preservatives, colours and additives, added more lean protein, reduced my intake of dairy foods and ate a bigger variety of vegetables.”

Liquid kilojoules (cordial, soda, milk)

»

Water

Brownies

»

Protein brownies

Flour pancakes

»

Quinoa pancakes

Cake

»

Low-carb cake (e.g. coconut flour)

White rice

»

Couscous

 

Emily Skye 

emilyskye

Fitness model  //  emilyskye.com

Taken from –

Fitness model healthy food swaps

Posted in Bodybuilding, Health Issues, Nutrition, Personal Fitness Training, Sports nutrition, Weight lossComments Off on Fitness model healthy food swaps

pilates

The fit lifestyle with Cassey Ho

Tired of starting a diet every summer of every other Monday? We chat to blogger Cassey Ho about how she stays fit and healthy all year round. Take note.

Aim for balance with food: I allow myself a YOLO (you only live once) meal once or twice a week. But the rest of the time I eat clean, enjoying lots of plant foods, fresh produce, grass-fed meats, wholegrains and unsweetened beverages. I try to eat carbs, protein and healthy fats at every meal to keep me full and energised. The one thing I minimise is dairy – it makes my skin break out. I also avoid foods high in sodium, saturated or unhealthy fats, chemicals and preservatives, additives and colours.

Lose the rules: Going on diets or strict meal plans just doesn’t work for me. I always crave the foods I’m missing out on, and once that ‘diet’ is over, I want to binge on the foods I was restricting. Over time, I’ve learned to eat in a balanced way – that way I no longer have crazy cravings for junk food that cause me to binge and feel guilty.

Avoid extremes: When I was prepping for my bikini competition several years ago, I was put on this crazy diet of only eating about 1000-to-1200 calories (around 4, 200kJ) a day while I was working out for four hours a day! As a result I felt tired, irritable, angry and frustrated. My mind was foggy and I couldn’t concentrate. I was labelling food as ‘good’ and ‘bad’ and felt like I was trapped in food jail. For eight to 10 weeks I endured this crazy plan. I did the bikini competition with my new, lean body, and then I decided to go back to ‘normal-healthy’. But when I tried to introduce a variety of foods back into my diet, like brown rice, quinoa and different types of protein, my body did not like that at all. It acted like a sponge, soaking everything up. 

For the next three years, I gradually gained weight. And there was nothing I could do to stop it. During this time, I was still working out really hard for about one hour a day, but my body just didn’t respond. It rebelled. It was seriously frustrating because in my mind, I was doing everything right. Diet and exercise should equal weight loss or at least weight maintenance. But because of the damage and stress that I put my body under during that bikini prep, my hormones became unbalanced and I am still getting back to normal.

Aim for more sleep and less stress: I learned a lot from my bikini comp experience. Cortisol, the stress hormone, increases when you significantly lower your kilojoules, over-exercise and/or don’t have enough sleep. And cortisol plays a role in increasing abdominal fat, more specifically, lower-belly fat. This stress also decreases leptin, the hormone that controls your appetite. So you feel extra hungry all the time and it’s likely that you may crave those carbs and high-fat foods. That’s exactly what happened to me. Getting enough sleep, eating sufficient kilojoules and taking time to de-stress and relax are really important for your waistline and wellbeing.

Treat yourself: When you deprive yourself of cake or ice-cream, you start to think about them all the time and that leads to bingeing. Instead, I allow myself treats – in moderation. And because I know I can have them from time to time, I don’t crave them or eat more of them than I should.

Focus on health, not weight: I rarely step on the scales anymore because I know that my weight does not tell me how strong or fast I am. When I’m at my healthiest, I can tell by how I feel. When I am consistent with my diet and workouts, I am happy, motivated and energised. When I start to feel sluggish and drained, I know that my eating habits may be off and my workouts aren’t as routine – so I address that.

Use the seasons: What I love about the changing seasons is that they allow me to prepare myself for fresh beginnings four times a year. So with each season I see a chance to refocus and find a new rhythm and routine to optimise my health goals. I also try to rediscover delicious seasonal flavours to keep my clean-eating habits on track.

See the original article here –

The fit lifestyle with Cassey Ho

Posted in Bodybuilding, Diets, Exercises, Health Issues, Nutrition, Weight lossComments Off on The fit lifestyle with Cassey Ho

weight_loss_fat_loss_gut_abs_stomach_measuring_weight_scale_main

The Truth About Weight Loss

 

The start of every health kick can be a glorious time, with your motivation at its highest and the fitness gains at their easiest to come by. Your muscles might be aching, and your diet could be missing a few unhealthy favourites, but the weight will be dropping off like nobody’s business.

At some point, however, you might find that whatever efforts you make in the gym or the kitchen do not result in any further losses when you step on the scales.

Your weight plateaus, or perhaps even nudges slightly upwards. Obviously, this can be the ultimate motivation killer if your main goal is weight loss, but a simple scales reading can be misleading when it comes to your general health.More important than how much you weigh is your body composition – namely how much of your body is made up of fat, muscle, bones, water, assorted organs, and so on.

See the original post:

The Truth About Weight Loss

Posted in Bodybuilding, Diets, Fitness Equipment, Health Issues, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight lossComments Off on The Truth About Weight Loss

Sleep

The Secrets Of Sleep

 

It’s easy to overlook your sleep when you start on a health kick. Your focus naturally drifts towards planning out your diet and exercise as the two key aspects of your fitness routine, and clearly they are both very important.

However, all the work you do in your waking hours can be undermined if you don’t pay any attention to your sleep, as keeping your mind and body well rested is the foundation of a healthy lifestyle.

Anyone who’s ever had a poor night’s sleep knows the physical, mental and emotional toll it can have on a person. Offices all over the world are full of people drifting through the day unable to concentrate on their work due to tossing and turning all night, but the effects of bad sleep can be far more drastic than feeling a little grouchy the next day.

Regular poor sleep raises the risk of suffering severe medical conditions including obesity, heart disease and diabetes, and shortens overall life expectancy.

Source:

The Secrets Of Sleep

Posted in Health Issues, NutritionComments Off on The Secrets Of Sleep

stephlow

A day in the life of a gluten-free guru

 

As a sports nutritionist, triathlete and self-confessed cashew butter addict from Melbourne, Stephanie Lowe is passionate about the health benefits of going gluten free. Her blog offers written posts and podcasts about everything from gut health to fat loss. It also offers delicious GF recipes and Lowe’s ebooks, including Free From Gluten and Real Food Reset. 

My food philosophy

 

“Real is best. Food that comes out of the ground, from a tree or from an animal is the most nutrient dense and whole source of nutrition. In fact, one of the biggest changes we can make to improve our health is to significantly reduce or eliminate our intake of packaged foods.”

Foods on high rotation in my diet

“Every meal I eat contains many non-starchy vegetables such as spinach, broccoli and zucchini. It also contains a quality protein such as free-range eggs or grass-fed meat and good fats such as avocado and olive oil. My carbohydrates come from wholefood sources, such as berries and sweet potato. Eating this way offers me optimal nutrient density, blood sugar control, satiety and long-term health benefits.”

Foods I avoid

“I stay away from packaged foods and particularly avoid ingredients that promote inflammation in the body, such as gluten, refined sugar and polyunsaturated seed oils such as canola oil (because they are high in omega-6 fatty acids, which we have too much of in our Western diet). I believe that anti-inflammatory nutrition is the key to my good health today, and tomorrow.”

Why I became gluten free

“I stopped eating gluten nine years ago to help my mental state and heal my relationship with food, which wasn’t healthy. I was so inspired by the changes I experienced that I went back to university to study nutrition at a post-graduate level so I could educate others on the power of real food. Before this dietary change, I was eating gluten every day, whether it was a small amount through traditional soy sauce or in larger quantities in low-fat cereals and muesli bars.”

Health benefits

“Once I stopped eating gluten, my digestion improved, but the biggest change was the emotional impact – I felt calmer and happier. I really began to understand that with 90 per cent of serotonin receptors (our happy hormone) found in our gut, the food that we eat has a significant influence on our brain and mental health.”

Challenges

“It can be tricky when waiters at a restaurant don’t quite understand gluten free, or perhaps don’t take your request seriously enough. The great thing is that in 2016 the awareness of gluten free is quite high and many restaurants code their menu GF, which makes ordering out very easy. Ten years ago it was much more challenging to cut out gluten, as many people didn’t even know what gluten was. Now, as long as you communicate what your dietary requirements are, most restaurants and cafes will go out of their way to assist.”

My transition tips

“The best way to approach gluten free is to focus on real food. If you fill your plate with non-starchy vegetables, quality protein and good fats, and choose wholefood carbohydrates, you are 99 per cent of the way there. Healthy, fresh food doesn’t come in a box, so there is really minimal need for the gluten-free products that are increasingly appearing on our supermarket shelves. Stick to whole and fresh foods instead.”

My day on a plate

Breakfast:

» A berry smoothie with spinach, avocado, coconut milk, cinnamon and raw pea protein

Lunch:

» Shepherd’s pie with pumpkin mash or a three-egg omelette with a side of avocado and kimchi

Dinner:

» Grass-fed steak or free-range chicken with a rocket salad or steamed greens topped with grass-fed butter and Himalayan salt

Posted in Diets, Health Issues, Nutrition, Weight lossComments Off on A day in the life of a gluten-free guru

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Arnold Schwarzenegger Blueprint Trainer Day 24

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Saturday’s cheat meal is still four long workouts away. Are you keeping it clean in the meantime? Despite having a legendary appetite, Arnold also knew that being the best in required world-class dietary discipline. Here’s how his training partner Ed Corney remembers eating with him:

“He wanted to get better and I wanted to get better, so we trained, we dieted. The diet was really funny. We would order a hamburger steak and get the napkins and pat the top to get the grease off. At home we would have tuna with eggs whites mashed up. No other food in the house, because then you can’t get to it,” Corney told Bodybuilding.com in 2007.

Ed Corney hands Arnold some much-needed protein. The lifting partners were careful about what foods they kept in their home.

Read that again and ask yourself: What’s in your house? You know you need fuel to grow, and plenty of it. But is there a stash of junk food calling to you from another room? If so, maybe it’s time to do some spring cleaning.

  • Arnold performed a max-effort squat when he really wanted to push the limits. Judge how you’re feeling and if things are going well, work up to a max-effort squat every couple weeks.

    Technique Max Effort
    Pick one exercise and see what you can do for a 1-rep max. To get there, work up to the weight with the following rep pyramid, taking ample rest between each set: 20, 15, 10, 8, 5, 3, 1, 1, 1-rep max.

  • Barbell Squat Barbell Squat Barbell Squat
    5 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Stiff-Legged Barbell Deadlift Stiff-Legged Barbell Deadlift Stiff-Legged Barbell Deadlift
    5 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Good Morning Good Morning Good Morning (only perform once per week)
    5 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Barbell Lunge Barbell Lunge Barbell Lunge
    5 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Superset
  • Leg Extensions Leg Extensions Leg Extensions
    5 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Seated Leg Curl Seated Leg Curl Seated Leg Curl
    5 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Superset
  • Standing Calf Raises Standing Calf Raises Standing Calf Raises
    5 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Seated Calf Raise Seated Calf Raise Seated Calf Raise
    5 sets of 8-12 reps
  • Cable Crunch Cable Crunch Kneeling Cable Crunch
    4 sets of 25 reps

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About The Author

Check out these awesome articles by some of the best writers in the industry.

Link: 

Arnold Schwarzenegger Blueprint Trainer Day 24

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, UncategorizedComments Off on Arnold Schwarzenegger Blueprint Trainer Day 24

<div id="DPG" webReader="187.485974851"><p>We've all experienced it. After a week of rigorous exercise and dieting—and Tupperware containers full of broccoli, brown rice, and chicken—you feel an uncontrollable urge to stray from your carefully planned meal plan. You measured and weighed all your meals but, alas, you hear ice cream and pasta calling your name. As it turns out, that voice could be especially loud if you're a woman.</p><p>According to a study published in the "International Journal of Eating Disorders,"<sup>1</sup> women tend to crave sugary snacks like chocolate, ice cream, and donuts. Men, on the other hand, prefer to sink their teeth into a well-marbled porterhouse. Women seem to lack <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/protein.htm">protein</a> in their diets, even when it comes to cheat meals! A lack of protein can be problematic for anyone, but it's especially troubling for women in the gym.</p><p>While your body needs carbs and healthy fats for energy, protein is essential for tissue growth and repair. If you're in the gym knocking out tough sets of squats and Romanian deadlifts, a lack of protein in your diet can hinder your body's ability to recover and grow!</p><p>Read on to learn more about the myriad powers of protein and how you can put them to work!</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c11">1 The Importance Of Protein</h3>
</p><p>The reasons for adding more protein to your diet plan are numerous. Of the 20 <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/amino.html">amino acids</a> that make up protein, nine are essential. "Essential" means that your body can't manufacture these aminos on its own. The only way they can be consumed is through food. Dietary protein supplies the building blocks of muscle tissue. It also supplies the materials needed for neurotransmitters and hormones.</p><img src="images/2014/a-womans-guide-to-demystifying-protein-1.jpg" width="560" height="325"/><p>Women tend to crave sugary snacks like chocolate, ice cream, and donuts. Men, on the other hand, prefer to sink their teeth into a well-marbled porterhouse.</p><p>Each time you hit the gym for a workout, you break your muscle tissues down. You actually build them <em>outside</em> the gym. To do that, however, you need enough fuel. With proper protein intake, amino acids come to the rescue of your damaged muscle, repairing those tissues so they grow back even stronger.</p><p>Protein provides other key benefits to the hard-working, fit female.</p><h4>Protein: </h4><p>If you're constantly ravenous throughout the day, you're probably not eating enough protein at every meal. Compared to carbohydrates, protein takes longer to break down and digest.</p><p>This slow digestion time means you'll stay fuller longer and keep hunger at bay, making it easier to hit your caloric intake and macros for bodyweight maintenance.</p><h4>Protein: </h4><img src="images/2014/a-womans-guide-to-demystifying-protein-2.jpg" width="288" height="271" border="0" class="right-image c13"/><p>If you're constantly ravenous throughout the day, you're probably not eating enough protein at every meal.</p><p>Protein has the highest thermic effect of food (TEF), which is the amount of calories it takes your body to process and utilize a nutrient. At 20-35 percent, protein has the highest TEF.</p><p>This means that your body actually uses 20-35 percent of the energy from protein consumed just to digest and absorb it!</p><p>Out of every 100 calories you get from protein, 25-30 are burned in the digestion process.</p><p>Since your body expends more energy to process proteins than it does to digest carbohydrates and fats, people who consume more protein throughout the day might see faster fat-loss results than people on a lower-protein diet plan.</p><h4>Protein: </h4><p>As your caloric intake drops, and carbohydrates and fats become scarce on a strict diet, there's a greater chance that your body will turn to incoming protein for energy. This leaves less protein for various bodily functions.</p><p>If insufficient amino acids are present, your body will start breaking down muscle tissue to get individual aminos. For you, this could mean a loss in muscle and a slower resting metabolism. Protect against this by prioritizing protein!</p><h4>Protein: </h4><p>Oh, the wonders of whey. If you choose to add <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/whey.html">whey protein powder</a> to your diet, you'll be taking in more than muscle-building strength gains. You get an immune boost, as well. Whey protein contains glutathione, a tripeptide that helps strengthen immune function.<sup>2</sup></p><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/bpi-sports/whey-hd.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/bpi-sports-whey-hd-banner.jpg" width="560" height="144"/></a><p>
<h3 class="article-title c11">2 Myths About Protein</h3>
</p><p>One of the reasons that some women shy away from protein is because they believe the myths. Don't let false rumors cost you gains. Clear up confusion by separating fact from fiction.</p><h4>Myth: </h4><img src="images/2014/a-womans-guide-to-demystifying-protein-3.jpg" width="265" height="533" border="0" class="right-image"/><p>Protein will make you stronger. It won't turn you into an "overly ripped" version of yourself.</p><p>Protein will make you stronger. Associate it with powerful, lean muscle gains, not a masculine physique. Choosing chicken over chocolate and hitting the weights hard won't turn you into an "overly ripped" version of yourself. Put your mind at ease and know that this simply won't occur.</p><p>Ladies, remember that your body contains just a fraction of the testosterone needed to build up lean muscle tissue. Even with the addition of protein, you're not going to pack on muscle the same way your male counterpart might.</p><p>Your body can also only make so much lean muscle per day. Excess protein won't necessarily increase your muscular development. Excess protein gets broken into amino acids to be used as fuel or excreted, so don't worry too much about this myth.</p><h4>Myth: </h4><p>If you have pre-existing kidney problems, then you definitely want to be a little more careful about adding protein to your diet plan. But, provided you're an active woman in good health, you can safely increase your protein intake.</p><p>Just remember that increased protein can be dehydrating, so you'll want to increase your water consumption at the same time.</p><h4>Myth: </h4><p>There's no definitive proof that high-protein diets cause the excess acid load that's been linked to bone loss and poor health.</p><p>In fact, according to the "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition," studies found that high-protein diets had a small but significant benefit to the lumbar spine.<sup>3</sup></p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c11">3 Your Essential Protein Intake</h3>
</p><p>So, how much protein do you need? The suggested number differs depending on the source.</p><p>According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the standard food guide recommendation for the average individual is set around 46 grams per day for women and 65 grams per day for men.<sup>4</sup></p><p>Keep in mind, however, that this is the recommendation for the average, semi-sedentary individual. If you're constantly exercising and breaking down lean muscle tissue, your required protein intake needs to increase. Likewise, if you diet and consume fewer calories from carbs and fats, the macros you consume from protein will need to increase.</p><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/a-womans-guide-to-demystifying-protein-brooke.jpg" width="560" height="380" class="c13"/><p>People who just exercise and do not diet should aim to consume somewhere around 0.8-1 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight daily.</p><p>People who just exercise and do not diet should aim to consume somewhere around 0.8-1 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight daily.</p><p>If you're dieting and exercising, aim higher—between 1-1.5 grams of protein per pound of your bodyweight per day. As your caloric intake decreases, your protein needs will actually increase, so keep that in mind as you plan out your diet.</p><p>Focus on eating high-quality protein sources such as chicken, fish, lean red meat, eggs, low-fat dairy products, and quality whey protein powder.</p><h5>References</h5><ol class="dpg-list"><li><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11429982" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11429982</a></li>
<li><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1426093" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1426093</a></li>
<li><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19889822" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19889822</a></li>
<li><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/everyone/basics/protein.html#How%20much%20protein" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">http://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/everyone/basics/protein.html#How%20much%20protein</a></li>
</ol><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/bpisports/bpisports.htm"><img src="images/2013/bpi-sports-banner-2.jpg" width="560" height="144"/></a><br class="c16"/></div><div class="padded-content article-content mod-about-the-author" id="article-about-author" webReader="40.009569378"><h4 class="article-section-header">About The Author</h4><div class="ata-left-column" webReader="6.54088050314"><div class="ata-author-name"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/sclark.htm">Shannon Clark</a></div><div class="author-gradient-button"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/sclark.htm">VIEW AUTHOR PAGE</a></div><p class="ata-author-summary">I’ve been working in the field of exercise science for the last 8 years. I’ve written a number of online and print articles.</p></div><div class="ata-right-column"><div class="ata-author-image-frame"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/sclark.htm"><img src="images/2013/writer-shannon-clark-sig-new.jpg" alt=""/></a></div><div class="ata-view-all-articles-link"><ul class="bb-chevron-list bold-type"><li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/sclark.htm#articles" class="bold-type">View All Articles By This Author</a></li>
</ul></div></div></div>

Women And Protein: Your Complete Guide

We’ve all experienced it. After a week of rigorous exercise and dieting—and Tupperware containers full of broccoli, brown rice, and chicken—you feel an uncontrollable urge to stray from your carefully planned meal plan. You measured and weighed all your meals but, alas, you hear ice cream and pasta calling your name. As it turns out, that voice could be especially loud if you’re a woman.

According to a study published in the “International Journal of Eating Disorders,”1 women tend to crave sugary snacks like chocolate, ice cream, and donuts. Men, on the other hand, prefer to sink their teeth into a well-marbled porterhouse. Women seem to lack protein in their diets, even when it comes to cheat meals! A lack of protein can be problematic for anyone, but it’s especially troubling for women in the gym.

While your body needs carbs and healthy fats for energy, protein is essential for tissue growth and repair. If you’re in the gym knocking out tough sets of squats and Romanian deadlifts, a lack of protein in your diet can hinder your body’s ability to recover and grow!

Read on to learn more about the myriad powers of protein and how you can put them to work!

1 The Importance Of Protein

The reasons for adding more protein to your diet plan are numerous. Of the 20 amino acids that make up protein, nine are essential. “Essential” means that your body can’t manufacture these aminos on its own. The only way they can be consumed is through food. Dietary protein supplies the building blocks of muscle tissue. It also supplies the materials needed for neurotransmitters and hormones.

Women tend to crave sugary snacks like chocolate, ice cream, and donuts. Men, on the other hand, prefer to sink their teeth into a well-marbled porterhouse.

Each time you hit the gym for a workout, you break your muscle tissues down. You actually build them outside the gym. To do that, however, you need enough fuel. With proper protein intake, amino acids come to the rescue of your damaged muscle, repairing those tissues so they grow back even stronger.

Protein provides other key benefits to the hard-working, fit female.

Protein:

If you’re constantly ravenous throughout the day, you’re probably not eating enough protein at every meal. Compared to carbohydrates, protein takes longer to break down and digest.

This slow digestion time means you’ll stay fuller longer and keep hunger at bay, making it easier to hit your caloric intake and macros for bodyweight maintenance.

Protein:

If you’re constantly ravenous throughout the day, you’re probably not eating enough protein at every meal.

Protein has the highest thermic effect of food (TEF), which is the amount of calories it takes your body to process and utilize a nutrient. At 20-35 percent, protein has the highest TEF.

This means that your body actually uses 20-35 percent of the energy from protein consumed just to digest and absorb it!

Out of every 100 calories you get from protein, 25-30 are burned in the digestion process.

Since your body expends more energy to process proteins than it does to digest carbohydrates and fats, people who consume more protein throughout the day might see faster fat-loss results than people on a lower-protein diet plan.

Protein:

As your caloric intake drops, and carbohydrates and fats become scarce on a strict diet, there’s a greater chance that your body will turn to incoming protein for energy. This leaves less protein for various bodily functions.

If insufficient amino acids are present, your body will start breaking down muscle tissue to get individual aminos. For you, this could mean a loss in muscle and a slower resting metabolism. Protect against this by prioritizing protein!

Protein:

Oh, the wonders of whey. If you choose to add whey protein powder to your diet, you’ll be taking in more than muscle-building strength gains. You get an immune boost, as well. Whey protein contains glutathione, a tripeptide that helps strengthen immune function.2

2 Myths About Protein

One of the reasons that some women shy away from protein is because they believe the myths. Don’t let false rumors cost you gains. Clear up confusion by separating fact from fiction.

Myth:

Protein will make you stronger. It won’t turn you into an “overly ripped” version of yourself.

Protein will make you stronger. Associate it with powerful, lean muscle gains, not a masculine physique. Choosing chicken over chocolate and hitting the weights hard won’t turn you into an “overly ripped” version of yourself. Put your mind at ease and know that this simply won’t occur.

Ladies, remember that your body contains just a fraction of the testosterone needed to build up lean muscle tissue. Even with the addition of protein, you’re not going to pack on muscle the same way your male counterpart might.

Your body can also only make so much lean muscle per day. Excess protein won’t necessarily increase your muscular development. Excess protein gets broken into amino acids to be used as fuel or excreted, so don’t worry too much about this myth.

Myth:

If you have pre-existing kidney problems, then you definitely want to be a little more careful about adding protein to your diet plan. But, provided you’re an active woman in good health, you can safely increase your protein intake.

Just remember that increased protein can be dehydrating, so you’ll want to increase your water consumption at the same time.

Myth:

There’s no definitive proof that high-protein diets cause the excess acid load that’s been linked to bone loss and poor health.

In fact, according to the “American Journal of Clinical Nutrition,” studies found that high-protein diets had a small but significant benefit to the lumbar spine.3

3 Your Essential Protein Intake

So, how much protein do you need? The suggested number differs depending on the source.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the standard food guide recommendation for the average individual is set around 46 grams per day for women and 65 grams per day for men.4

Keep in mind, however, that this is the recommendation for the average, semi-sedentary individual. If you’re constantly exercising and breaking down lean muscle tissue, your required protein intake needs to increase. Likewise, if you diet and consume fewer calories from carbs and fats, the macros you consume from protein will need to increase.

People who just exercise and do not diet should aim to consume somewhere around 0.8-1 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight daily.

People who just exercise and do not diet should aim to consume somewhere around 0.8-1 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight daily.

If you’re dieting and exercising, aim higher—between 1-1.5 grams of protein per pound of your bodyweight per day. As your caloric intake decreases, your protein needs will actually increase, so keep that in mind as you plan out your diet.

Focus on eating high-quality protein sources such as chicken, fish, lean red meat, eggs, low-fat dairy products, and quality whey protein powder.

References
  1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11429982
  2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1426093
  3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19889822
  4. http://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/everyone/basics/protein.html#How%20much%20protein


About The Author

I’ve been working in the field of exercise science for the last 8 years. I’ve written a number of online and print articles.

Visit link – 

Women And Protein: Your Complete Guide

Posted in Bodybuilding, Diets, Exercises, Nutrition, UncategorizedComments Off on Women And Protein: Your Complete Guide

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Ask The Siege: How Do I Improve My Strength And Aesthetics?

QSiege, I’m going to be honest: I’m in the gym to carve a six-pack. But I was wondering if it’s possible to look good and be strong. You seem like the right guy to ask.

I know all about you, bro. You’re in the gym for one thing, and one thing only: aesthetics. Forget about eating, sleeping, or drinking—if you don’t have that coveted V-taper, you might as well pack it in because your life has lost all meaning. Oh, I get it, aesthetics are the new “big.” Nobody talks about how big guys are anymore; it’s all about, “Oh, damn, that guy’s aesthetic as hell!”

Well, that’s nice and all, but pretty little guys have to learn how to look good and be strong. That’s the new rule of fitness. I’m calling it “strengthetics.” Yeah, you can walk around with a good physique and leave everybody ‘mirin, but if you don’t have any go with your show, strong people are going to call you out on it… or laugh at your weak lifts.

Prepare yourself for more articles on this subject—it’s dear to my heart. Today, we’re going to concentrate on your core. A six-pack is a matter of diet; a strong, healthy core is a matter of training. Here’s what you need to know.

“Strengthetics” For Your Abs

A lot of guys like the thought of having a tiny waist and carved six-pack. Shoulder-to-waist ratio is like Hollywood magic—the bigger the ratio the better you look. Abs training, however, doesn’t work how you think it does. If you spend half an hour at the end of every workout doing crunches and can’t figure out why your belly isn’t looking any better, I’ve got some new rules for you to follow.

You’re never going to do another sit-up or crunch again. One of the biggest problems in society is caused by everyone sitting on their asses so much. This sedentary lifestyle makes the hip flexors shorter and the pelvic tilt more pronounced—that’s why back problems are so common. Crunches and sit-ups just add to the stress in your back, so stop doing them!

“Crunches and sit-ups just add to the stress in your back, so stop doing them!”

Do you seriously think that your body evolved the way it has so that you could lay down on the floor, curl up into a fetal position, and somehow grow yourself a six-pack? Your abs were built to stabilize your body through isometric, eccentric, concentric, and rotational contraction in an upright position. Stop lying down on the job.

Compound Your Six-Pack

If you want six-pack that’s actually strong, you need to do standing compound movements like standing presses, squats, front squats, and deadlifts. When you do compound exercises, you train your entire core, along with the other muscles you activate doing those lifts. That means you don’t have to do any extra abdominal work. It’s built in to your workout.

Instead of doing all your shoulder presses seated, stand up and engage your abdominals, lumbar, and a whole mess of other muscles! Doubt that you can work your abs doing presses? Then try a heavy front squat. Unrack the barbell and tell me you can’t feel your abs engage.

Ab-Strength Exercises

If you’re not getting enough compound action in your program, add the exercises below to your workouts a couple times per week. These movements will keep your core nice and tight without making your waist overly wide, and without affecting the hip flexors. We want to keep our midsection slim and trim, so keep that volume down and your strength up!

1 Cable twists

2 sets of 12-15 reps at each height
These can be done from three different positions: low, middle, and high. I suggest a mixture of all three. If you do it from the top, the movement should mimic a sledgehammer swing. Put the cable at the midpoint and make sure your feet are wide so you only engage your upper body. A top-to-bottom cable twist should mimic a bad golf swing.

Each of these variations provides rotational, concentric abdominal work which engages your entire midsection, including the obliques. Make the movement fast and powerful. Go for speed.

2 Overhead medicine ball slam

3 sets to failure
This is full-body movement requires energy generated from the core. Raise a medicine ball above your head with both arms and throw it down as hard as you can. Pick it up and repeat until you are fully exhausted.

3 Planks

2 sets of 30 seconds
During each training session, your goal should be to increase the time you can hold a plank position. Have a partner assist you once you can hold a plank for more than 20 seconds; have your partner push you down or place weight on your back.

4 Ab roller

3 sets of as many reps as possible
I like the ab wheel because it can be scaled to skill level. Start on your knees so you can limit the amount of extension. The extension portion should be slow and controlled. As your strength increases, try doing them from a standing position.

Depending on your skill level, you can do other forms of eccentric work. An advanced athlete could perform dragon flags, but a beginner probably should start by perfecting the ab roll-out and progress from there.



About The Author

In addition to his day-to-day activities, Noah Siegel is also a personal trainer, fitness model, and sponsored athlete for Optimum Nutrition.

Taken from:

Ask The Siege: How Do I Improve My Strength And Aesthetics?

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, UncategorizedComments Off on Ask The Siege: How Do I Improve My Strength And Aesthetics?

<div id="DPG" webReader="151"><p>When it comes to building muscle, boosting your performance, adding strength, or torching fat, staying hungry for success is key. No matter how hungry you are, however, plateaus and hurdles will rise. Whether your workout program stops yielding results or you just hit a motivational snag, the time will come when you need to push the envelope and hit some new training techniques.</p><p>Don't get complacent with your workouts, personal bests, or results. Focus on progress, and keep getting better! Every training session is a chance to improve, especially if you add some new tools to your training kit. To kick things up a notch, break free of plateaus, and jumpstart your workout, check out these six cool tips and techniques.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">1 Go Slow to Grow</h3>
</p><p>Wander into any gym and you're bound to see someone lifting at lightning speed. I'm sure you've seen a guy at your local gym blasting through biceps curls by the dumbbell rack, gunning each arm like it's a death race. Alas, many trainees make this mistake. They perform every exercise and rep as quickly as possible, using momentum to swing the weight up before letting pull it back down.</p><p>When it comes to training, tempo and timing are key. Slow down your movement pattern. You don't necessarily have to use a glacial training tempo, but you should pause at the top and bottom of each rep. Keep tension on the working muscle, but don't let yourself swing the weight. Doing this will place more total stress on the muscle tissue, causing more stimulus for growth.</p><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/6-training-tips-to-skyrocket-your-results-1.jpg" width="560" height="397" border="0"/><p>"When it comes to training, tempo and timing are key."</p><p>If you really want to spur new results, slow the down the eccentric portion of your big lifts. The eccentric portion of a repetition is the lowering phase, like lowering the weight in a biceps curl. Slow eccentric lifting can create more mechanical muscular damage and lead to increased growth, so go slow when you want to grow!</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">2 Stagger Your Calories</h3>
</p><p>If you're like most people trying to build muscle or cut fat, you're probably pounding calorie-boosting, muscle-building meals or eating light to ensure you come in at a calorie deficit. If you're eating the right quantity and quality of foods, you should be seeing results in either direction. But are you seeing the best results possible? If progress has slowed, try staggering your calories.</p><p>Those who stagger their calories tend to see superior results over those who keep them at a baseline level throughout the week. Sure, staggering takes a bit more work on the planning front, but it's worth it, and the main recipe is pretty darn simple: Eat more on the days you train, and less on the days you don't.</p><p>If your aim is more size, a staggered calorie approach with a greater surplus on your training days will give you fuel for exercise and growth when you really need it. Likewise, if you're dieting, taking a larger deficit on non-training days and eating closer to maintenance on workout days will keep you better fueled for intense training and help prevent a metabolic crash due to constant low-calorie intake.</p><img class="float-left c11" src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/6-training-tips-to-skyrocket-your-results-2.jpg" width="239" height="321" border="0"/><p>"Find that next level, discover what it feels like, and then raise your expectations of what you need to do to create change."</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">3 Train With Someone<br /><span class="c13">Stronger</span></h3>
</p><p>BPI Vice President James Grage rebuilt a competition-worthy physique after surviving a brutal car crash. Once he recreated his foundation, he found a workout buddy with more experience to take kick his results up a notch. "To take your training to the next level, you have to know what the next level is," he says.</p><p>"You may think that you're giving it 100 percent, but what are you basing that on?" James asks. "Do you really know what you're capable of? You won't know until you push yourself beyond what you're familiar or comfortable with." Train with someone who trains harder than you. Find that next level, discover what it feels like, and then raise your expectations of what you need to do to create change.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">4 Alter Your Macronutrient Ratio</h3>
</p><p>You've probably read diet advice that says moderate-to-high carbs, moderate protein, and lower fat intake is best for muscle-building success. But, have you ever tried something else? While a higher carb intake works for some people hungry for weight gain, others see even better results when they boost their fat intake and keep carbs down.</p><p>In short, don't chain your diet to one specific macro ratio without engaging in some personal exploration. Once you've mastered calorie management, try shuffling your macronutrients around. Play around with your different macronutrient percentages to find what works best for your body. Different ratios might boost your results and help you feel better on a day-to-day basis.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">5 Shut Down The Machines</h3>
</p><p>Weight machines are great for specific applications and overall exercise variety. With many machines, you don't have to worry as much about technique or form, but if you're really looking to advance, free weights are essential. Using dumbbells and barbells requires more total muscle activation because you need to stabilize yourself through each lift. That same required stabilization will help strengthen your core and various accessory muscles.</p><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/6-training-tips-to-skyrocket-your-results-3.jpg" width="560" height="357" border="0" class="c14"/><h6 class="altH6 c15">Barbell Deadlift</h6><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">6 Try A Heavy, High-Rep Set</h3>
</p><p>If you really need to supercharge a single training session, combine intensity and volume for one heavy, high-rep set. Unlike other sets, where you goal is to move through each reps before resting, this protocol calls for you to take a brief 10-second pause between each rep you perform. Doing this will allow you to move into a higher rep range per set while using a heavier weight.</p><p>Using this technique, you can train your body to better tolerate fatigue while lifting a near-maximal load. You'll start developing a higher level of muscle strength than you previously thought possible, and you'll create more muscular damage and metabolic stress. Guess what those cause? More growth.</p><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/bpisports/bpisports.htm"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/bpi-sports-banner-2.jpg" width="560" height="144" class="c16"/></a><br class="c17"/></div><div class="padded-content article-content mod-about-the-author" id="article-about-author" webReader="40.009569378"><h4 class="article-section-header">About The Author</h4><div class="ata-left-column" webReader="6.54088050314"><div class="ata-author-name"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/sclark.htm">Shannon Clark</a></div><div class="author-gradient-button"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/sclark.htm">VIEW AUTHOR PAGE</a></div><p class="ata-author-summary">I’ve been working in the field of exercise science for the last 8 years. I’ve written a number of online and print articles.</p></div><div class="ata-right-column"><div class="ata-author-image-frame"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/sclark.htm"><img src="images/2013/writer-shannon-clark-sig-new.jpg" alt=""/></a></div><div class="ata-view-all-articles-link"><ul class="bb-chevron-list bold-type"><li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/sclark.htm#articles" class="bold-type">View All Articles By This Author</a></li>
</ul></div></div></div>

6 Training Tips To Skyrocket Your Results

When it comes to building muscle, boosting your performance, adding strength, or torching fat, staying hungry for success is key. No matter how hungry you are, however, plateaus and hurdles will rise. Whether your workout program stops yielding results or you just hit a motivational snag, the time will come when you need to push the envelope and hit some new training techniques.

Don’t get complacent with your workouts, personal bests, or results. Focus on progress, and keep getting better! Every training session is a chance to improve, especially if you add some new tools to your training kit. To kick things up a notch, break free of plateaus, and jumpstart your workout, check out these six cool tips and techniques.

1 Go Slow to Grow

Wander into any gym and you’re bound to see someone lifting at lightning speed. I’m sure you’ve seen a guy at your local gym blasting through biceps curls by the dumbbell rack, gunning each arm like it’s a death race. Alas, many trainees make this mistake. They perform every exercise and rep as quickly as possible, using momentum to swing the weight up before letting pull it back down.

When it comes to training, tempo and timing are key. Slow down your movement pattern. You don’t necessarily have to use a glacial training tempo, but you should pause at the top and bottom of each rep. Keep tension on the working muscle, but don’t let yourself swing the weight. Doing this will place more total stress on the muscle tissue, causing more stimulus for growth.

“When it comes to training, tempo and timing are key.”

If you really want to spur new results, slow the down the eccentric portion of your big lifts. The eccentric portion of a repetition is the lowering phase, like lowering the weight in a biceps curl. Slow eccentric lifting can create more mechanical muscular damage and lead to increased growth, so go slow when you want to grow!

2 Stagger Your Calories

If you’re like most people trying to build muscle or cut fat, you’re probably pounding calorie-boosting, muscle-building meals or eating light to ensure you come in at a calorie deficit. If you’re eating the right quantity and quality of foods, you should be seeing results in either direction. But are you seeing the best results possible? If progress has slowed, try staggering your calories.

Those who stagger their calories tend to see superior results over those who keep them at a baseline level throughout the week. Sure, staggering takes a bit more work on the planning front, but it’s worth it, and the main recipe is pretty darn simple: Eat more on the days you train, and less on the days you don’t.

If your aim is more size, a staggered calorie approach with a greater surplus on your training days will give you fuel for exercise and growth when you really need it. Likewise, if you’re dieting, taking a larger deficit on non-training days and eating closer to maintenance on workout days will keep you better fueled for intense training and help prevent a metabolic crash due to constant low-calorie intake.

“Find that next level, discover what it feels like, and then raise your expectations of what you need to do to create change.”

3 Train With Someone
Stronger

BPI Vice President James Grage rebuilt a competition-worthy physique after surviving a brutal car crash. Once he recreated his foundation, he found a workout buddy with more experience to take kick his results up a notch. “To take your training to the next level, you have to know what the next level is,” he says.

“You may think that you’re giving it 100 percent, but what are you basing that on?” James asks. “Do you really know what you’re capable of? You won’t know until you push yourself beyond what you’re familiar or comfortable with.” Train with someone who trains harder than you. Find that next level, discover what it feels like, and then raise your expectations of what you need to do to create change.

4 Alter Your Macronutrient Ratio

You’ve probably read diet advice that says moderate-to-high carbs, moderate protein, and lower fat intake is best for muscle-building success. But, have you ever tried something else? While a higher carb intake works for some people hungry for weight gain, others see even better results when they boost their fat intake and keep carbs down.

In short, don’t chain your diet to one specific macro ratio without engaging in some personal exploration. Once you’ve mastered calorie management, try shuffling your macronutrients around. Play around with your different macronutrient percentages to find what works best for your body. Different ratios might boost your results and help you feel better on a day-to-day basis.

5 Shut Down The Machines

Weight machines are great for specific applications and overall exercise variety. With many machines, you don’t have to worry as much about technique or form, but if you’re really looking to advance, free weights are essential. Using dumbbells and barbells requires more total muscle activation because you need to stabilize yourself through each lift. That same required stabilization will help strengthen your core and various accessory muscles.

Barbell Deadlift

6 Try A Heavy, High-Rep Set

If you really need to supercharge a single training session, combine intensity and volume for one heavy, high-rep set. Unlike other sets, where you goal is to move through each reps before resting, this protocol calls for you to take a brief 10-second pause between each rep you perform. Doing this will allow you to move into a higher rep range per set while using a heavier weight.

Using this technique, you can train your body to better tolerate fatigue while lifting a near-maximal load. You’ll start developing a higher level of muscle strength than you previously thought possible, and you’ll create more muscular damage and metabolic stress. Guess what those cause? More growth.


About The Author

I’ve been working in the field of exercise science for the last 8 years. I’ve written a number of online and print articles.

Link – 

6 Training Tips To Skyrocket Your Results

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, UncategorizedComments Off on 6 Training Tips To Skyrocket Your Results


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