Tag Archive | "exercises"

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High Intensity Power Training Workouts for Fat Loss, Strength and Fitness

For most guys, when they think of conditioning for fat loss, it means either nausea-inducing sprints or churning away on a treadmill for hours like a hamster. Fortunately there’s an alternative style of training that’s as time-efficient as sprints and doesn’t require you to stray away from the weights. Furthermore, because this style of training actually places an emphasis on high-volume technical exercises, you’ll be able to get more skillful repetitions for different lifts that many guys struggle with. What this means for you is that this program will help you get stronger at technical lifts while also improving your body composition. How do you go about achieving this goal?  With High Intensity Power Training.

SEE ALSO: 7 Reasons You Need HIIT

Researchers wanted to examine what effects Crossfit-style High Intensity Power Training had on body composition and aerobic fitness. They had a 43-person group consisting of healthy men and women participate in a 10-week High Intensity Power Training program. The program consisted of various lifts preformed as quickly as possible, combined with skill work for select gymnastic exercises and Olympic lifts. The study results showed that both genders were able to improve their aerobic fitness as evidenced by improvements in their VO2 max numbers. In addition to this, both genders were also able to reduce their body fat percentages to the tune of 3.3% less body fat in the female participants and 4.0% less body fat in the male participants.

These two High Intensity Power Training workouts combine the beneficial aspects of the study so you can improve body composition, aerobic fitness and enhance skills that’ll transfer over to bigger PRs.

For best results, perform each repetition in the workout as explosively as possible, with little rest in between exercises. Each workout will be performed circuit-style, consisting of a total of 3 sets for each exercise, with 3-5 minutes rest in between circuits. The weight used should be challenging but not too heavy where you can’t complete a circuit. If you don’t have experience with Olympic lifts, you can substitute the barbell lifts with moderately heavy dumbbell or kettlebell variations. Take at least one day off between workouts.

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High Intensity Power Training Workouts for Fat Loss, Strength and Fitness

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Think you’re fit? Scientists just figured out how to become even fitter.

WE ALL TRY to do what we can to stay as fit as possible—hit the gym four or five times a week, pick up a yoga class or two, visit a CrossFit box occasionally to amp up the endurance training—but we can always do more to hone our physique and diet to get to the next level of fitness.

Now, a team of researchers is starting to hone in on a comprehensive strategy to get there. And while the individual components are probably familiar to regular Men’s Fitness readers, this program represents a solid all-around plan to build your fittest self yet.

It’s called PRISE—short for Protein-pacing, Resistance exercise, Interval sprints, Stretching, and Endurance exercise—and in a study, the researchers at Skidmore College found that the program not only boosted the fitness of already physically fit people, but also improved their total body fat mass and abdominal fat, lean body mass, metabolic and heart health.

The researchers tested the regimen on people ages 30–65 who had been doing cardio and resistance training for a minimum of four days a week at no less than 45 minutes each time for the last three years—fairly experienced gym rats, in other words. In the 12-week study, subjects consumed modest amounts of protein throughout the day (called protein pacing), and then performing the fitness routines four times a week. The only experimental difference? One group took a bit more protein (1g vs 2g per kg of body weight per day) and added antioxidant-rich supplements to their diet.

After 12 weeks, all subjects showed improvement in fitness, including healthier blood vessels, more upper body strength and endurance, and better core strength—but the group that took the antioxidants exhibited the most improvement.

“Whether your goal is to improve fitness or heart health, the quality of your diet and a multi-dimensional exercise training regimen [like PRISE] can make all the difference,” said Paul Arciero, D.P.E., study author and exercise scientist at Skidmore. “It’s not about simply eating less calories and doing more exercise. It’s about eating the right foods at the right time and incorporating a combination of exercises that most effectively promotes health and fitness.”

To get started on a similar plan, mix and match these great workouts:

5 rowing workouts to get your ripped

10 metabolic moves to supercharge weight loss

The muscle-building, fat-burning workout plan to build your perfect body

Link:

Think you’re fit? Scientists just figured out how to become even fitter.

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Health Issues, Nutrition, Personal Fitness Training, Sports nutrition, Training Methods, Weight loss, Weight TrainingComments (0)

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Meet Fitness Model Muri Rodrigues

It takes a lot of work to get a rock-hard body. But it’s not just about putting in time at the gym. As Brazilian bombshell Muri Rodrigues knows, beauty and fitness come from the inside out.

Rodrigues, who attracted a large international following through the popular Brazilian TV show Legendario, is currently a spokesmodel for MuscleMeds Performance Nutrition and for Nutri Import, the largest distributor in Brazil of the supplement brand. Her work has brought her around the world, providing nutrition, exercise, and supplement advice to thousands of fans.

Her travels inspired Rodrigues to launch BeautiFit, a new program promoting the synergistic relationship between fitness and lifestyle changes. “If a woman wants to achieve both beauty and a fit, curvaceous body, she needs to first focus on being healthy,” explains Rodrigues. “If you eat a well-balanced diet and pay close attention to the little things that matter most, you will see the results you want.”

While her conditioning routine clearly plays an important role in achieving her sculpted physique, Rodrigues emphasizes that her goal isn’t necessarily just to get cut abs or shapely glutes. “Beauty starts with a healthy diet, low-stress lifestyle, and focused fitness,” she explains. “You can work out all you want, but if you don’t eat right or get enough sleep, you won’t look your best. It’s a well-rounded fitness regimen that will provide the great skin, lean body, and beautiful aura you’re seeking.”

Rodrigues’ own beauty and diet program begins with foods rich in omega fatty acids, high-fiber carbs, and lean protein, plus probiotics for internal balance and healthy skin. Obtaining eight hours of restful sleep nightly is also very important to avoid dark circles and bags under the eyes. “The key to attaining beautiful skin and hair and a fabulously fit body is to focus all your efforts on being healthy,” she concludes. “Everything else you are seeking will follow. Pay attention to the little things and enjoy the end rewards!”

Excerpt from:

Meet Fitness Model Muri Rodrigues

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How to Use 4 Different Resistance Bands

Resistance bands are more than just stretchy pieces of rubber. Not only are they effective for getting in a full-body workout when time is short and equipment is sparse, but different bands can enhance your flexibility and mobility and help you push past sticking points. Here’s a crash course on getting the most from your bands.

WARMUP: MINI BANDS

Mini bands activate your glutes, which helps prevent other muscles from coming into play during exercises like deadlifts and squats to compensate for mediocre glute activation.

When to use: Before working sets, especially on lower-body days.

How to use: Step through the loop and secure the mini band just above the knees.

FREE MUSCLE & FITNESS APP:

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SAMPLE EXERCISES

  • Lateral Shuffle: Stay in an athletic stance and keep tension on your glutes; don’t allow your feet to touch.
  • Split-stance Walk: With one foot staggered, walk forward while maintaining a split stance.
  • Glute Bridge: Lie supine with your feet planted on the floor and the band looped just above your knees. Thrust your hips into the air, focusing on pressing your knees outward.

VARIED RESISTANCE: LOOPED BANDS

This band variety can help assist with pullups and dips and move you past sticking points—weak portions of the lift—by increasing resistance on compound movements to strengthen the weak area.

When to use: Before or during a training session.

SAMPLE EXERCISES

  • Band-resisted Pushup: Wrap the band around your upper back and hold each end in your hands. Rep out your pushups.
  • Pullup/Dip Assistance: Loop the band around a pullup/dip bar and place one foot on the looped band.
  • Band-resisted Back Squat: Loop two bands on either end of a barbell and secure the other end to the top of a squat rack (pull down) or to heavy dumbbells placed on the floor (pull up). These are best used with compound movements like the squat, bench press, and deadlift.

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How to Use 4 Different Resistance Bands

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Emily Skye Talks Fitness and Body Image

In the fitness industry, popularity in the form of “likes” and followers on social media often lends credibility to undeserving blockheads. Thankfully, there are also people like Emily Skye who use their fame for more than personal gain. The 32-year-old Australian model and fitness expert is honest and transparent with the 13 million people who follow her on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube: Imperfection is human. Skye demonstrates this by unabashedly pulling back the curtain. Yes, she’ll post sexy bikini pics in which her waist is tiny and her midsection is ripped, but she’ll also post photos of her cellulite and weight gain during training lulls, too. It’s all done to spread a message: Perfection is impossible to achieve, but happiness and appreciating your body isn’t.

 M&F: What got you into fitness?

ES: I was 25 years old, and I’d had enough of living a life of not being satisfied and not being the best that I can be. I was unhappy and suffered from depression, anxiety, and pretty bad body-image issues. I started implementing changes in all different areas of my life by eating healthier foods, exercising, and surrounding myself with supportive people. Over time I just became happier and happier. I loved the life that I was living, and I wanted to share that with the rest of the world with the hope it would have a positive impact on other people. I made it my mission and here I am today, several years later, still going at it.

Do you feel a certain level of responsibility with having 13 million social media followers across YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter?

It’s pretty surreal to have that amount of followers listen to me and support me. It’s amazing. I feel blessed to be in this position, and I like to use it to inspire, motivate, and educate.

How does one curate such a massive following?

You have to make a deliberate effort to post valuable content that people can learn from every single day. I think that’s something a lot of people don’t realize. They think, “Oh, they’re so lucky,” and that it happened overnight. It’s not an overnight thing.

You also post what some might consider unflattering photos of yourself. Why?

I like taking pretty photos, but I also like to show my cellulite and stretch marks and when I gain a little fat. That’s important. Posting perfect photos in the right lighting from the right angle in the right pose—young girls see that and believe that [type of] perfection exists. When they realize that it’s unattainable, they get upset and compare themselves with these Instagram models.

Read article here:

Emily Skye Talks Fitness and Body Image

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The Fitness Ageless Wonders

Shellie Edington, 52

From: Columbus, OH
Stats: Crossfit Games Masters Champ (2016 Winner, 50–54)

Edington has a six-pack that women 30 years younger would envy. Her abs (and the rest of her impressive physique) were earned through an intense five-days-a-week CrossFit program that includes running, rowing, Olympic lifting, and other CrossFit staples.

Edington discovered the sport five years ago, after getting bored with her occasional workouts at a traditional gym. “I felt at home there the moment I walked in,” she says. That didn’t mean it was easy: Edington says she could barely do a pushup or a pullup. “I was shocked by my lack of strength and skill. I was terrified to go back—which is exactly why I did.”

Although she competed in gymnastics through high school and was a cheerleader in college, Edington stepped away from fitness when she became a full-time mother of three. Starting a company called Tumblin4Kids that taught gymnastics classes for toddlers in 2000 kept her somewhat active, but she felt her body slowing down. “I was really dragging. I had put on about 20 extra pounds, and I thought I was going to have to retire from teaching kids because it was too hard to move around.”

She committed to going to a CrossFit affiliate three times a week for an hour at a time, and after a few weeks she started to add twice-weekly Olympic lifting to work on her technique. Around the same time, she started
a Paleo diet that helped her drop about 25 pounds from her 5’3″ frame. Her coaches encouraged her to compete in CrossFit Open events, and she took up the challenge with gusto. In 2014, Edington placed third in her age group at the Reebok CrossFit Games, and fifth in 2015, then went on to win the Masters 50–54 division in 2016.

As proud as she was to stand on the podium, Edington says the ultimate payoff is how she feels. “My hashtag is now #youarenotdoneyet because every day is a chance to get better.”

Workout schedule:

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The Fitness Ageless Wonders

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Hannah Jeter Sizzles in ‘Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 2017’ Shoot

First, he liked it so he put a ring on it. Now, the man who was once one of America’s most famous bachelors is ready to start a family.

That’s right, everyone — our very own Hannah Jeter is expecting her first child with retired New York Yankee hubby Derek Jeter.

Larry Busacca/Getty Images

The pair wed back in July in a star-studded affair in Meadowood Napa Valley Resort in California. Among the fewer than 100 guests were former teammates along with fellow models and family members from both sides.

“We’re just happy and excited at the moment to be newlyweds,” she told E! this summer when asked about having kids. “And I think that’s our focus right now.”

Looks like plans changed! Luckily, the stunning duo has experience as proud pet parents of Kane, a 100-plus pound Italian Mastiff. Derek revealed that he and Hannah were engaged in Nov. 2015 after penning a love letter to his beloved pup, who was originally a Christmas gift from his then-girlfriend.

In a new first-person essay on The Players’ Tribune, Hannah opens up about the difficulty of adjusting to her husband’s level of fame and the pressure it put on their relationship from the beginning. She goes on to announce that as they look forward to welcoming a baby girl into their family, they want to maintain a certain level of normalcy.

“We want our kids’ lives to be as ‘normal’ as possible,” Hannah penned. “They’re going to be born into such an extraordinary situation. They’re going to have to be some strong little people. We don’t want them to be defined by their dad’s name — for them, we want him to just be “Dad.” That will be the piece of him they’ll have that the rest of the world doesn’t. It will be special, and it will be theirs.

“Still, though, I want them to know Derek Jeter. I feel some sadness — and Derek must as well — thinking about how our children will never get to experience that time in his life. We can show them videos, and photos, and memorabilia — I already can’t wait to show them footage of that last night at the Stadium. But I know it won’t be quite the same. I’ll tell them myself: You had to be there. And I’m sure that both of us will be thinking about that in May.”

Original article:

Hannah Jeter Sizzles in ‘Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 2017’ Shoot

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Iron Is A Girl’s Best Friend

Vital Stats

When I first picked up weights a few years ago, maximal lifting wasn’t even on my radar. I ran around in circles with my 10-pound dumbbells, completely unaware that I was missing out on an entire world of fitness.

In the world of 1RM strength, you set specific goals and work for weeks or months to inch closer to them. You push your body to its limits to achieve a triumph that only lasts a couple of seconds. But you also get rewarded with a rush unlike anything else. It’s a great world to be a part of, and it’s changed the entire way I view health and fitness.

I wouldn’t say I’m an expert on heavy lifting—yet. But I’ve still learned some important lessons along the way, and I’m confident you’ll find them just as helpful as I did. If you’re looking to find your numbers or move them up into uncharted territory, here are five rules you need to take to heart.

1 Train Systematically

If you’re currently training in the 10-20 rep range and have limited experience with anything less—think 3-8 difficult reps—then you aren’t ready for a 1RM test. Attempting a max test when you’re mentally and physically unprepared is a bad idea. You’re just setting yourself up for failure.

I highly suggest using a program that trains specifically for the kind of intensity you’ll find in a 1RM test. I used Jim Wendler’s 5/3/1 system successfully for several months before getting a more personalized powerlifting training program from the Strength Guys. Trust me, proper programming makes all the difference both in terms of performance and safety. Squatting 3 reps at 85 percent 1RM is an entirely different ballgame than doing 15 reps on the leg press. Programs like 5/3/1, the Westside System, or Stronglifts 5×5 will prepare you for the intensity that lies ahead.

If you’re unsure of your max or haven’t yet had the chance to test it, I suggest using a 1RM calculator initially. Just enter your best lift, and it does the work for you. The heavier the weight and the lower the number of reps, the more accurate the calculator is. For example, 200 pounds for 5 reps is more accurate than 150 pounds for 9 reps. Nothing is as accurate as actually getting under the bar and testing your 1RM—preferably with some supervision from somebody who’s done it many times—but, these calculators can give you a sufficient idea of what your max should be. You’ll need that number in order for the percentage-based training of strength programs to be effective.

2 Learn How To Get in the Right Headspace

Testing your 1RM requires a serious amount of intensity and concentration. You won’t be frolicking in the land of unicorns, bunnies, and rainbows here. To be honest, testing your 1RM sucks. It usually hurts physically, and it always challenges your body’s idea of what is “possible.” Putting that kind of stress on your body is more than just a physical trial, though. It’s a mental one, too. Before you step up to a barbell to try for your max lift, you need to be a master of these three skills:

Focus

If you find your mind in 35 different places and none of them are at the gym with the bar, it’s not the day to test your max. There may be no such thing as the perfect day, but there are optimal conditions that give you a shot at hitting your best numbers. You want to be present and composed with mental clarity. Your focus should be on one thing and one thing only: moving that heavy weight.

Bench Press
Visualization

Visualize yourself easily pulling your deadlift max. Then see yourself adding some more weight and pulling again with ease. Picture your bench max going up without a hitch. Visualizing not only gives your confidence a much needed boost before you tackle your lift, but it can also actually improve motor performance, making your 1RM attempt a major success.

Jamming Out

Not everybody needs music in order to get into a PR headspace, but for many of us, it’s crucial. Listening to music during a training session has been proven to improve performance; it can also be a great boost of motivation when you’re aiming to venture into uncharted waters. Some people like screamo heavy metal to get their blood pumping, and others prefer electronic music, jazz, or film soundtracks to help calm their mind and set the scene for an epic triumph. Whatever works for you, do it!

3 Embrace The Routine

Everyone has their own way of getting ready for a max. Some people do a specific number of warm-up sets, and some people listen to a particular playlist or eat a particular meal. Find a routine that works for you and stick with it. For people who haven’t yet had the chance to take a 1RM, this is what I suggest the first time around:

Warm up

An extensive warm-up process is essential to get an accurate 1RM and prevent injury. I start with some basic mobility work, taking my joints through a full range of motion, and then I move to my warm-up sets.

Get heavy slowly

Opinions vary about which rep scheme to use as you work up to a heavy weight. Your program or coach might have a specific way of doing this; if so, follow it. Here’s the routine that I like to follow when testing my max or going for a PR.

  • Bar x 10
  • 50% x 5
  • 60% x 3
  • 70% x 2
  • 80% x 1
  • 90% x 1
  • 95% x 1
  • 1RM attempt

High reps don’t have a place on max day. I want to know that I can push or pull heavy weight, which is why I perform several sets of a single rep as I get closer to my max. Each of these reps boosts my confidence and prepares me mentally and physically for the pinnacle lift.

No matter how you choose to arrange your warm-up sets, they should fully prepare your muscles, joints, and central nervous system for the lift ahead. I always leave at least 2-3 minutes of rest between my warm-sets, and then I give myself an extra minute or two as I get closer to my max attempt.

“High reps don’t have a place on max day. I want to know that I can push or pull heavy weight.”

4 Find a spotter

I like to train alone. If you see me in the gym, my headphones are usually in, my hat is down low, and I have a leave-me-alone-until-I’m-done look on my face. On max day, it’s a different story. It’s crucial that you have someone spotting your bench max, unless getting pinned under a barbell sounds like your idea of a good time.

Utilizing a spotter on squat max testing isn’t always necessary, particularly if you squat in a rack with safety bars. If I’m testing my squat, I generally use the safety bars for warm-up sets and then grab the most experienced lifter I can find to spot me for my max attempt. Pulling a random spotter off the gym floor isn’t something that I mind doing, but if this is something you’re uncomfortable doing, bring a friend you trust to put your nerves at ease. And maybe have them read up on the rules of spotting first.

There’s no way to spot a deadlift physically, since you either pull the bar off the ground or you don’t. That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t invite a mental or emotional spotter along for the ride. If you feel like having someone yell “light weight!” in a Ronnie Coleman voice would help you move a heavy weight, then by all means make sure they’re there!

5 Make Your PR A Lift Like Any Other

The time has come. You’ve been training for this moment for months. You’ve done your warm-up sets, you’re focused and ready, and now it’s go time. All of your prior training has led you to this moment. Scary, right?

“I’m nervous, I’m pumped, I’m motivated, and I want to do something I’ve never done before.”

I’m always a mixed bag of emotions right before my lift, but I think that’s what carries me through and gives me the best possible lift. I’m nervous, I’m pumped, I’m motivated, and I want to do something I’ve never done before. Somewhere in that mess of emotions, I usually just say “Enough! I’m ready to do this,” and then I go for it.

Aside from this inevitable dialog, though, the mechanics of a max attempt should be the same as all the other lifts you practiced up until this point. This isn’t the time to do a quarter-rep or forget to engage your lats when you deadlift. As you visualize your lift, you should be taking note of form and remembering all your normal cues. A max lift where you injure yourself in the process doesn’t count in my book.

After your initial attempt is complete, step back and assess. How do you feel? How did the lift go? Are you ready for more, or did it take everything out of you? I like to keep going until I either miss a lift or know there’s no logical way I can get that weight back up. But many people will stop after one, and that’s fine.

If you feel like you’re ready to conquer another max attempt, I suggest giving yourself 7-10 minutes of rest before you step up to the bar again. Add no more than 5-10 pounds to the bar; don’t get greedy. Even if you leave that second or third max attempt unrealized, you should feel damn good about what you accomplish!

6 Don’t Overthink It

I’m often guilty of beating myself up after the fact. Did I eat too much? Too little? Could I have done another rep? Should I have done more weight? We all do it. When you’re completely invested in something—like so many of us in the world of health and fitness are—you want to be perfect.

But when you’re waging war against big numbers and percentages, there’s nothing to be gained by harboring regrets. Nagging doubts and questions can take over your brain and prevent you from improving, but just as importantly, they can keep you from enjoying an important victory.

The best possible advice I can give you is to let go. At no time is that more crucial than during and after your 1RM attempt. If you walk up to the bar wondering if you’re going to miss, or questioning your preparation, or revisiting the failed lifts of the past, you’ve already lost. You just have to go for it.

You’re ready. It’s time to believe in yourself. Pick up that weight and show the bar who’s boss.

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All About One-Repetition-Maximum Testing

This article will explain exactly how to conduct one-repetition-maximum testing and suggest ways in which test results can be applied across a range of training objectives.

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Iron Is A Girl’s Best Friend

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Personal Fitness Training, Training Methods, Warm up, Weight loss, Weight TrainingComments Off on Iron Is A Girl’s Best Friend

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The Resistance Row Workout Finisher

DIRECTIONS: This is a three-part circuit, in which you’ll complete a low row, a medium row, and a high row with a resistance band for each of the three categories: speed, control, and isometric. Rest 30 seconds between each category. Complete three to five rounds of this entire circuit.

CIRCUIT SEQUENCES

  • Speed: Complete all three rowing sequences for 20 seconds, with the goal of getting as many reps as possible.
  • Control: Complete all three rowing sequences for 30 seconds, with a 3-0-1-1 tempo. (The first number is the lowering phase, the second is the pause at the bottom, the third is the lifting phase, and the fourth is the pause at the top.)
  • Isometric: Hold each row in the designated position for 20 seconds

Credit –

The Resistance Row Workout Finisher

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Pick ’n’ mix Pilates moves

Get your best body ever with these pick ’n’ mix Pilates moves tailored to your natural shape

While there are no specific exercises that should or shouldn’t be performed depending on whether you have an apple, pear, hourglass or athletic figure, there certainly are some that can help to make your workouts more effective.

‘Pilates can really help you to focus on specific exercises in order to enhance your particular shape,’ says Nadine McCann, instructor at Bootcamp Pilates (bootcamppilates.com). ‘All bodies are different and it pays to know what works for you.’

That’s not to say all women with the same body shape have the same goals, but certain moves can help apple shapes to define their curves, for example, and athletic figures to focus on their glutes. What’s more, everyone can benefit from the postural power of Pilates! ‘Pilates is great for sculpting as it focuses on the stabilising muscles deep in the body,’ Nadine adds. ‘This allows each muscle and joint to work with minimal stress and maximum effort in order to increase strength, flexibility and length.’ The workout as a whole is suitable for all body types, but if you’re short on time, just pick the exercises for your body type.

How to do it

Complete the allotted reps and sets of each exercise before moving on to the next. Perform these exercises in the order they appear.

1. Toe taps

Best for: apple, pear, hourglass

Areas trained: stomach, core, hips

Technique

Start lying on your back with legs lifted and knees bent above your hips, shins parallel to the floor and arms relaxed at your sides, palms down. Keep your lower abs engaged and your back flat on the mat.

Inhale, then exhale as you hinge at your hip, lowering your right leg toward the mat.

Inhale to return the leg to start position and change sides.

Alternate legs repeating 10-12 reps on each side, bring feet to the floor to rest. Repeat for 2 sets.

2. Criss-cross

Best for: apple, hourglass, athletic, pear

Areas trained: core, sides

Technique

Lying on your back, interlace your hands behind your head to support your head. Lift your knees and feet off the ground with your knees bent at 90 degrees.

Inhale as you twist your ribcage to the left and extend your right leg forward.

Exhale as you take your body through the centre, twisting your ribcage to the right while extending your left leg to complete the exercise on the opposite side.

Do 6 twists alternating sides. Do 3 sets in total.

3. Glute bridge

Best for: hourglass, athletic

Areas trained: core, bottom, hips, lower back

Link:

Your shape sessions: Oblique Exercises

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Personal Fitness Training, Training Methods, Warm up, Weight lossComments Off on Pick ’n’ mix Pilates moves

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