Tag Archive | "exercises"

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How to exercise smart and prevent injury

When you hit the gym, the field or the track, the last thing you want to take home is an injury. But the more time you spend exercising, the higher the risk. Here are several tips to help manage, treat and prevent injuries so you can keep doing what you love, for longer.

Research has shown that women are especially susceptible to debilitating ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), which helps to stabilise the knee joint. A combination of anatomical, biomechanical and other factors is at play. When comparing a woman’s physiology to a male, women have smaller, weaker muscles supporting the knee, a wider pelvis, and thigh bones which angle inward more sharply from hip to knee. Women also have a greater imbalance between the quadricep and hamstring muscles, which can contribute to knee injuries. And there are biomechanical differences between the way men and women land on their feet, as in running or jumping. Researchers have also suggested that the female hormone oestrogen makes women more vulnerable to ACL injury by weakening this ligament.

The importance of warming up

A proper warm-up will heat and loosen the body. Different forms of sport and exercise require different warm-ups, but as a general rule, a dynamic warm-up will get all the joints moving one at a time, then all together, taking the body through progressive movements that loosen and stretch your muscles. Classic dynamic warm-up moves include walking lunges, toe touches, and high knees.

Your outfit counts

For some sports, protective equipment is important to prevent damage. This is particularly relevant for sports involving physical contact, think football and hockey (shin guards) and boxing (boxing gloves and protective head gear).

It’s also important to wear the correct footwear. The right shoes will support the foot and ankle, helping to prevent twisting and injury. In addition, many athletes wear supports, such as knee, ankle, or elbow supports, to offer additional support and protection to joints which may have been weakened by an earlier injury. Supports help stabilise the joint and prevent further damage.

Keep moving post-workout

More exercise is probably the last thing on your list after a big session, but according to a study recently published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, performing light exercise post-workout may help ease your soreness, and can be just as beneficial as having a massage.

Another useful tip is to use heat to increase blood flow, which will ease your sore muscles. Soak in a hot bath, or if the pain is isolated, apply heat directly to your trouble spot. Many peel-and-stick heating pads stay in place for hours and are thin enough to wear under clothing.

Finally, taking an Omega-3 pill once a day reduces soreness and eases inflammation 48 hours after a strength-training workout, according to research published in the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine. Omega-3s — which are also found naturally in foods such as salmon, spinach, and nuts — may help boost circulation to sore muscles while also reducing inflammation.

Rehab your injury

If your injury is severe (i.e. you can’t put weight on the area, or have swelling, numbness or severe pain) you should see a doctor. If you can treat the injury yourself, the RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation) method is tried and tested and very often effective.

Rest. Reduce your regular activities. If you’ve injured your foot, ankle, or knee, take weight off of it.

Ice. Place an ice pack on the injured area for 20 minutes, four-to-eight times a day. You can use a cold pack or ice bag. Take the ice off after 20 minutes to avoid cold injury.

Compression. Put even pressure (compression) on the injured area to help reduce swelling. You can use an elastic wrap, special boot, air cast, or splint. Ask your doctor which one is best for your injury.

Elevation. Place the injured area on a pillow, at a level above your heart, to help reduce swelling.

 

Be prepared with a first aid kit

The type of first aid that may be required varies for every sport. Because bruises, abrasions, and sprained ankles are more common in some field sports, their first aid kit, for instance, needs to be stocked with cold packs, elastic bandages, and Band-Aids. A track team’s kit, on the other hand, needs to have plenty of supplies to treat blisters, abrasions, pulled muscles, and sprains. Sunscreen and allergy kits may also be appropriate for outdoor sports.

If you are regularly involved in sport, it’s worth having some knowledge of first aid, especially if you are playing sports in areas where there is no immediate access to trained medical people. At Real First Aid, you can sign up for first aid courses, or they can visit your workplace or sports club to work with larger groups. Think of it as an essential investment into your health and wellness, and that of everyone around you.

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cardiohiit

4 HIIT workouts to try now

So you want to be one of those super-fit (and perky) people? Set a goal and time frame and train using these HIIT workouts.

High-intensity interval training (HIIT) involves alternating short periods of intense anaerobic exercise with active recovery sessions. These short, intense workouts burn high levels of calories and improve athletic capacity.

How: Try the following routine over two to four weeks and complete two times per week. Make sure you record whether you reached the program goal or not. 

a.Workout 1: Incline sprints (lvl 35) 
30-second maximal output then drop incline and actively recover for 2 min x 5 sets

b. Workout 2: Incline sprints (lvl 35) 
45-second maximal output then drop incline and actively recover for 2 min x 5 sets

c.Workout 3: incline sprints (lvl 35) 
45-second maximal output, drop incline and actively recover for 1.5 min x 5 sets

d. Workout 4: Incline sprints (lvl 35) 
45-second maximal output, drop the incline and actively recover for 1 min x 5 sets

Insider’s tip: Try this instead of long steady-state cardio sessions and watch your fitness levels soar!

Discover more way to fast-track you fat loss here.

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sinead-main

Sweat. Believe. Roar. workout with Sinead Disaya

Your animalistic side with this high-intensity workout based on functional movement patterns, courtesy of trainer Sinead Disaya. 

Warning: requires a willingness to laugh at yourself as you crawl, sway and hop your way to a lean physique. 

Get it done

Set your timer for three minutes. Exercises are completed back-to-back as a superset, for 30 seconds each. No rest – just do the best you can in the three minutes. Rest for one to two minutes between each superset, depending on your fitness level. 

This workout combines functional movement patterns (moving the body in all directions) with high-intensity interval training (HIIT) designed to shred fat and improve mobility. Functional movement training is suitable no matter what your profession or fitness level – whether you’re an office worker who is sitting down the majority of the day, an athlete or rehabilitating post-injury. The purpose is to move your body in ways you normally wouldn’t help build strength and loosen up your joints. This can help reduce lower back pain, stiffness and poor posture. Focus on the intensity of your workouts – you only get out what you put in!

My Sweat. Believe. Roar. programs contain a balance of functional movement and traditional training methods to build lean muscle and overall strength. For my full guides visit sineaddisaya.com.

Photography: Christopher Cameron Photography

Super Set 1: 3 mins total 

Rainbow Lunges (30 secs x 3)

sinead-rainbowlunges.jpg

Rainbow Lunges focus on building muscle throughout your lower body as well as engaging your core. Start in the lunge position and keep your chest up. Brace your core and pivot your feet. Use your arms to created an arch above your body and finish again in your lunge position facing the opposite direction.

Palm Trees (30 secs x 3)

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Palm Trees are a fantastic exercise for your obliques and developing the strong ‘V’ line throughout your core. Start with your feet together, holding the weight overhead with both hands, and a soft knee bend. Drive your hips laterally almost making the letter ‘C’. Brace your core each time you change direction. Try to avoid moving your arms, as they will naturally tilt as your drive your hips to the side. 

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Sweat. Believe. Roar. workout with Sinead Disaya

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leg-stretch

How to measure your strength progression

Strength progression is all about how much weight you can lift, over a certain number of reps or sets, here’s how to measure your progression.

What is it?

Tracking strength progression is vital to any resistance based program, with muscles needing to be consistently challenged in order to fortify the neural connections and muscular adaptions needed for change. Lift the same weight, for the same reps and sets, for weeks on end, and you will likely plateau in both the potential health benefits of resistance training and body composition.

“If we are tracking strength increases, then it’s vital we record our workouts and weights in a diary. Knowing that on week one we pressed 20kg overhead and this week we pressed 22.5kg overhead is a big motivator,” says trainer and owner of Fully Loaded Fitness, Ethan Hyde.
Hyde.

“It also sets a benchmark. Once you hit 22.5kg, chances are you won’t get the 20kg again! Testing isn’t just about knowing some numbers – it motivates us to keep pushing forward and set new benchmarks along the way.”

Test 1: One- to 10-rep maximums

Hyde suggests beginners test their 10-rep max (the maximum weight you can lift with good form for 10 reps across a range of key lifts).

“One rep max tests are great on trained individuals. An untrained person lacks the strength and range of movement to load with a maximal weight. The risk of injury creeps up a bit too much,” says Hyde.

“It’s important not to worry about testing strength for every single exercise you do. Focus on the major lifts that are proven to be good measures of strength.”

Hyde suggests:

  • Horizontal push – bench press
  • Horizontal pull – bent over row
  • Vertical push – barbell press
  • Vertical pull – pull-ups or lateral pulldown
  • Knee dominant leg exercise – squats
  • Hip dominant leg exercise – deadlift

McKee uses a similar method, testing upper body strength via the bench press and lower body via the squat. For beginners, start with a barbell bar only on both lifts (five to seven kilograms) and add weight in 2.5kg to 5kg increments every 12 reps. For intermediate to advanced lifters, use an Olympic bar (20kg) and add weight in increments of 5 to 10kg.

“I also have interim key performance indicators where we look at the number of reps being achieved at a new weight level to ensure we keep the lifter motivated and on target to progress to the next level,” says McKee.

The test is complete when you can no longer lift the weight for 12 reps with good form. The weight on which you ‘fail’ should increase at the end of each phase of training.

Words by Katelyn Swallow.

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AMRAP high-energy body-weighted workout

What?

AMRAP stands for ‘As Many Rounds As Possible’, and the reason I love this type of circuit is because it’s so motivating! Instead of having to complete a certain number of exercise sets, AMRAPs are a race against the clock to complete as many rounds of the circuit as possible in the time allocated. This means short rest times, high reps and lots of hard work.

Why?

Sweaty, exhausted and feeling like you may spew – all in just 25 minutes? Why would you want to do this? The most common goal for my clients is to reduce body fat; to maintain muscle and ‘tone’ while stripping off the jiggle! AMRAPs are the perfect tool for completing such a goal.

AMRAP circuits are designed to burn a large amount of calories in a relatively short amount of time (think 20 to 30 minutes). The weighted (or body-weighted) exercises are predominately big compound movements which require a lot of energy to perform, combined with intense plyometric and cardio-based exercises – meaning you get great bang for your buck. While potential loss of muscle mass through copious cardio can be a concern, PowerFit AMRAPS are also great for improving muscle condition. You wouldn’t necessarily build significant muscle size due to the high rep range and energy expenditure, but you will maintain your muscle mass and improve muscle function.

Circuit style training is also great for improving fitness. If you are preparing for a sporting event such as an upcoming netball season or a long distance run, AMRAP circuits can be worked into your weekly routine to improve power, stamina and endurance.

Do

Try this Full-Body PowerFit AMRAP.

Complete each exercise one after the other, with as little (or no) rest in between as possible. Complete the entire circuit as many times as possible within a 30min time cap. Be sure to record your score so you can try and beat it next time.

Curtsy lunges x 10 reps
(5 alternating lunges on each side)

Jump squat x 10 reps

Butterfly sit-up x 10 reps

Jump lunges x 10 reps

Shoulder tap x 10 reps (5 alternating taps on each side)

graceworkout-curtsy.jpg

Begin by standing straight with your feet hip-width apart. Step your left foot behind the right leg as far as you can – legs should almost feel as though they are crossed. Lunge downwards, being careful not to lose your balance. Bring the left foot back to starting position, squat in the middle and then repeat on the right leg.

Jump squats – narrow stance

graceworkout-jumpsquats.jpg

Standing with your feet hip-width apart, jump into the air as high as you can and land in a squat position. Repeat.

graceworkout-butterflysitup.jpg

Lying on a mat, place your feet together and allow your knees to fall to the sides. Extend arms up above your head towards the ground, then sit up and reach through with your arms to touch your toes. Return to lying position and repeat.

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AMRAP high-energy body-weighted workout

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chest-press-with-resistance-band

Chest press with resistance band

How to

1. Attach the centre of the band to a stationary object and hold one end in each hand

2. Stand with your back to the attachment, elbows bent and shoulders abducted to 90 degrees (upper arm level with shoulder) so that your hands are next to your chest.

3. Push forwards and straighten your arms out in front of you.

4. Slowly return to the starting position.


Why use resistance bands?

They are super affordable and the ideal fitness multi-tasker. Just choose the right band based on your weight – it’s all written on either the packaging, online or ask in store. As you get stronger you’ll need to lower the assistance to account for your new strength.

For example, a robust general tension band combined with a heavy band offers roughly the same amount of resistance as a power band, but the combination gives you three different levels of assistance (one with the heavy band, one with robust, and one with both bands). Colours denote the different band strengths and vary between brands.

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comp_diet

The 12-Week Bikini Competition Diet

If you’ve always wanted to hit the stage in a bikini or figure competition, this is your time. Our comprehensive plan includes the Workout Plan, this nutrition plan, and motivational tips to help you get a winning physique in just 12 weeks. Give it a try—even if you’re not ready for the spotlight, you’re guaranteed to get into the very best shape of your life.

THE DIET PLAN

How it works: This nutrition program is designed to help you drop fat without losing muscle. In each phase, you’ll have three daily meals and three snacks. After every four weeks, you’ll reduce the number of calories in your diet, without sacrificing protein. In the week before the show, you’ll vary the amount of carbs, sodium, and fluids to help your muscles get that ultra-cut, superlean look just in time for your moment in the spotlight.

PHASE 1: WEEKS 1-4

Follow the meal plan outlined here, which also includes a Food Swaps guide below. In addition, try to consume at least one gallon (16 cups) of water a day. And a limited amount of sodium helps regulate body fluids, so don’t be afraid to use low-calorie condiments like mustard and hot sauce.

BREAKFAST

  • 4 egg whites
  • ⅓ cup (uncooked) instant oatmeal
  • 10 almonds

Totals: 240 calories, 20g protein, 22g carbs, 8g fat

MID-MORNING SNACK

  • 4 oz skinless, boneless chicken breast
  • 3 oz sweet potato, boiled or baked, without skin
  • ½ oz English walnuts, shelled

Totals: 258 calories, 26g protein, 17g carbs, 11g fat

LUNCH

  • 4 oz skinless, boneless chicken breast
  • ½ cup long-grain brown rice
  • 1 cup chopped broccoli, boiled or steamed

Totals: 263 calories, 29g protein, 34g carbs, 3g fat

MIDDAY SNACK

  • 1 scoop whey protein isolate
  • ½ large (8″) banana
  • 1 tbsp natural peanut butter

Totals: 271 calories, 29g protein, 19g carbs, 9g fat

DINNER

  • 5 oz cod
  • 1 white corn tortilla
  • 1 cup sliced zucchini, boiled

Salad with dinner

  • 2 cups mixed greens
  • 10 almonds, crushed
  • ¼ cup cherry tomatoes, quartered
  • ¼ cup red onion
  • 2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Totals: 328 calories, 32g protein, 32g carbs, 9g fat

EVENING SMOOTHIE

  • 1½ scoops whey protein isolate

Totals: 158 calories, 38g protein, 0g carbs, 1g fat

Daily Totals: 1,518 calories, 174g protein, 124g carbs, 40g fat

PHASE 2: WEEKS 5-8

In this phase, you’ll trim calories slightly to help drop body fat, although protein intake will stay steady to make sure your metabolism remains high and you’re not losing muscle tissue along with the fat. Feel free to keep referring to the Food Swaps list on page one. And keep up your fluid intake, drinking at least one gallon of water per day.

BREAKFAST

  • 3 egg whites
  • 2 oz 99% fat-free ground turkey breast
  • ⅓ cup (uncooked) instant oatmeal

Totals: 214 calories, 29g protein, 19g carbs, 3g fat

MID-MORNING SNACK

  • 4 oz skinless, boneless chicken breast
  • ⅓ cup long-grain brown rice

Totals: 172 calories, 25g protein, 15g carbs, 2g fat

LUNCH

  • 4 oz skinless, boneless chicken breast
  • 1 cup black-eyed peas, boiled
  • 1 cup chopped broccoli, steamed

Totals: 355 calories, 40g protein, 47g carbs, 3g fat

MIDDAY SNACK

  • 4 oz 99% fat-free ground turkey breast
  • 2 white corn tortillas
  • 1 oz avocado

Totals: 257 calories, 31g protein, 20g carbs, 6g fat

DINNER

  • 4 oz cod
  • 1½ oz avocado

Salad

  • ½ tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • 2 cups mixed greens
  • ¼ cup tomato
  • ¼ cup onion

Totals: 290 calories, 23g protein, 17g carbs, 14g fat

EVENING SMOOTHIE

  • 1 scoop whey protein isolate
  • 1 tbsp organic flaxseeds

Totals: 160 calories, 27g protein, 3g carbs, 5g fat

DAILY TOTALS:

1,448 calories, 175g protein, 121g carbs, 33g fat

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The 12-Week Bikini Competition Diet

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Sculpting full upper-body workout by Marcie King

This full upper-body workout targets abs from every angle while sculpting arms, back and chest.

Frequency

Two to three days per week.

The rules

Perform all exercises in pairs (e.g. 1&2, 3&4, etc), leaving 48 hours between workouts. (e.g. Tuesday and Friday). There is no rest between paired exercises. Once you have completed the pair, you will have a 30 to 60-second rest and move to the next pair of exercises. Repeat until you’ve completed all exercises. 

WORKOUT-upperbody

 

upperbody-kettlebellswings.jpg

 

 

ANTERIOR, MIDDLE DELTS, QUADS AND GLUTES, ABS

SET-UP: Stand with your feet a little wider than shoulder-width apart, holding onto a kettle bell with both hands in front of your body.

ACTION: Squat with the kettlebell hanging between your legs, chest and head up. In one motion, stand up as you swing the kettlebell forward (arms straight out in front) to shoulder level.

TIP: Push with your legs, not your back. If in doubt, seek expert technique advice. Incorrect kettlebell swings can cause injury.

upperbody-singlearmkettlebell.jpg

 

ANTERIOR, MIDDLE DELTS ABS CONTRACTED

SET-UP: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, one arm down at your side and one holding the kettle bell at your shoulder. Palm of hand facing up.

ACTION: Tighten your abs and press the kettlebell up towards the roof with a straight arm. Bring the kettlebell back down to shoulder height.

TIP: Start with a light kettlebell and progress once you have the range of motion.

upperbody-deltoidflys.jpg

 

REAR DELTS

SET-UP: Stand with feet shoulder-width apart. Bend forward slightly at your waist. Dumbbell in each hand, palms facing your body.

ACTION: Raise arms lateral (away from the body) out to the side with a slight bend at the elbow to shoulder level.

TIP: Lead with the elbow and only go until your arms are level with the shoulders.

Anterior delt front raises

 

upperbody-anteriordeltraise.jpg

 

 

ANTERIOR DELTS

SETUP: Standing with feet shoulder-width apart, body straight. Abs tight. Hold one dumbbell with the weight of the dumbbell in each hand. Palms facing the middle of the dumbbell.

ACTION: Lift the dumbbell straight out in front of you. Arms straight. Lift till the dumbbell is at shoulder level.

TIP: Pause at the top to really work the anterior delts. Keep your abs tight for balance.

upperbody-plankpushup.jpg

 

 

ANTERIOR, MIDDLE DELTS, PECS AND ABS

SET-UP: Place your palms flat on the floor, stacked under your shoulders. Place the top of your feet in the centre of the exercise ball. Body is parallel to the ground.

ACTION: Keeping your feet on the ball, bring your upper body down to do a push-up and press back up to plank position.

TIP: Keeping your abs and thighs tight will help you keep your balance.

upperbody-benchpushups.jpg

 

 

 

PECS, ABS, ANT, MIDDLE DELTS

SET-UP: Palms on a bench, legs/feet a little wider than shoulder width apart, body straight and abs tight.

ACTION: Keeping legs wide, go down to a push-up (face almost touching the bench) and push back up.

TIP: Keep abs tight to maintain the 45-degree posture. In this workout your abs are always working to provide your body with stability and strength. I have paired two exercises, working similar muscles to get the most benefits and fast results.

Marcie King (pictured)

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Sculpting full upper-body workout by Marcie King

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Time Saver Workout: Mini Spartan Madness

WORKOUT BY: Luis Buron, Spartan SGX Coach

 In this workout we’re simulating a Reebok Spartan Race. The mix of running in place and stepups imitate running and climbing uneven terrain and the moves mimic Spartan Race obstacles (as noted in parentheses). The workout finishes with Spartan signature penalty, burpees, and we go for 2 min. because an unpredictable challenge that you weren’t planning for is what we’re all about.
 1 minute: Run in Place
  • 30 seconds: Dead Hang (Rope Climb)
  • 1 minute: Stepup
  • 30 seconds: Box Jump (Wall Climb)
  • 1 minute: Run in place
  • 30 seconds: High Pushup Hold (Z Wall)
  • 1 minute: Stepup
  • 30 second: Body Row (Inverted Wall)
  • 1 minute: Run in place
  • 30 seconds: Hollow Hold (Slip Wall)
  • 1 minute: Stepup
  • 30 seconds: KB Deadlift (Bucket Carry)
  • 1 minute: Run in place
  • 30 seconds: Jumping Pullup (Hercules Hoist)
  • 1 minute: Stepup
  • 30 seconds: Kettlebell Swing (Atlas Carry)
  • 1 minute: Run in place
  • 30 seconds: Active Hang (Multi Rig)
  • 1 minute: Stepup
  • 30 seconds: Lunge (Sandbag Carry)
  • 1 minute: Run in place
  • 30 seconds: Bear Crawl (Barb Wire Crawl)
  • 1 minute: Stepup
  • 30 seconds: Broad Jump (Fire Jump)
  • 2 minutes: Burpee

Continued here:

Time Saver Workout: Mini Spartan Maddness

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wf-dumbbells

Train and gain! with this dumbbell workout

Here’s how strength training can get you a better bikini body…

More and more women are strength training when they hit the gym, but if you’re still not convinced, then you could be missing out on some serious benefits.

Whether you’re using the TRX, doing a kettlebell class or using a pair of dumbbells in your HIIT circuit – you are strength training! It’s not all about weightlifting belts, clouds of chalk and groaning as loud as you can – though, that’s all welcome, too! It is, however, about using weights that truly challenge you, promoting muscle growth that in turn elevates your fat burn. The result is a leaner you, with a higher metabolic rate throughout the day.

‘It’s estimated that for every half a kilo of lean muscle you gain, your body will burn 35-50 extra calories each day just to maintain it,’ explains John Shepherd, author of new book Strength Training for Women. ‘Regular cardio exercisers may lose weight but end up with a body that lacks tone and holds fat around key “problem” areas, such as the abdomen and hips.’ But those aren’t the only benefits you’ll experience – that’s just the beginning.

‘Resistance training will also boost your hormones,’ explains John. Basically, the more you pick up the weights, the more your levels of growth hormone are elevated. Why is this desirable? Well, along with playing a vital role in shedding fat, growth hormone also helps to slow the effects of ageing, according to John. Who wouldn’t want that? As we age we also experience a higher risk of osteoporosis, and strength training is an effective way of combating this. Not only do weights build muscle but they strengthen your bones, too, which is ideal for overall health as well as preventing injury.

Strength training also challenges your body in all different planes of motion, boosting its ability to master complex moves – especially ones that’ll help you in everyday life. We’re talking lifting, carrying, picking things up – that’s why it’s considered functional fitness.

Don’t know where to start? John’s book is a great place, but if you want a taster, check out this workout he put together. It’s suitable for all levels, targeting the whole body using compound exercises. ‘These moves work numerous joints,’ explains John, ‘making them more functional and calorie-burning.’ Always use weights that prove difficult in the final reps of each set without compromising form – but if you’re new to weights, start out light and focus on building strength and technique. Everyone should add weights each month to encourage progress.

HOW TO DO IT

Always warm up before and cool down after this workout. Do each of the two workouts once a week, leaving at least 48 hours between each.

Workout 1: Metabolic and hormonal booster

Perform 3 x 10 reps of each move. Take enough recovery to allow for each set to be completed optimally.

Workout 2: Pyramid with body shaping fast-twitch fibre emphasis

Perform 8 reps using a light weight, 6 using a medium weight, then 2 x 4 reps using a heavy weight.

Workout 1

 Rear foot elevated split squat

Areas trained: glutes, hamstrings, quads, calves

Technique

  1. Holding dumbbells by each side, stand in front of a bench and place the toes of your rear foot on it. Hop your standing leg forward and place your foot flat on the floor. This is your starting position.
  2. Keeping your trunk upright and looking straight ahead, bend your front leg to lower your body to the ground. Lower until your thigh is approximately  parallel to the ground. 
  3. Push back up strongly and repeat. Perform the allotted reps on one side, and then the other to complete a full set.

Seated shoulder press

Areas trained: shoulders, triceps

Technique

  1. Sit on a bench holding dumbbells in front of your shoulders.
  2. Press the dumbbells up to the ceiling, bringing them close together at the top of the movement.
  3. Lower under control and repeat.

Single-arm kettlebell swing

Areas trained: quads, hamstrings, glutes, core, back, shoulders

Technique

  1. Take hold of the kettlebell in one hand with your knuckles facing away from you. Stand with your feet just beyond shoulder-width apart. Let the kettlebell hang down at arm-length in front of your body and let it drop down and through your legs.
  2. Move with the fall of the kettlebell and let your bottom move backwards and torso incline forwards with knees soft. As the momentum of the weight begins to stall and go in the other direction, ‘snap’ your hips to impart more momentum onto the kettlebell to drive it up again.
  3. Let the weight fall back down and repeat. Perform the allotted reps on both sides to complete a set.

Plié squat

Areas trained: glutes, hips, hamstrings, quads, calves

Technique 

  1. Holding the dumbbells with your knuckles facing away from you in front of your hips, stand with your feet wider than shoulder-width and turned out, making sure that your feet and knees are similarly angled.
  2. Bend your legs to plié and then extend them to stand back up and repeat.

 

Workout 2

Clean

Areas trained: back, shoulders, glutes, hamstrings, quads, calves

Technique

  1. Take hold of a barbell from the floor with your knuckles facing forwards and hands just further than shoulder-width apart. Keep your heels on the floor, arms extended and head up.
  2. Drive up to lift the bar from the floor, keeping your shoulders over it and your knees bent.
  3. As the bar approaches hip-level, drive your hips forwards and now pull on the bar with your arms. As you do this, switch your grip from overhand to underhand and ‘catch’ the bar in a racked position on the front of your shoulders.
  4. Keeping your back flat, control the bar down to the floor, bending your knees and folding forwards, first to your thighs and then to the floor.

Squat

Areas trained: glutes, quads, hamstrings, back

Technique

  1. Support a barbell across the fleshy rear part of your shoulders (avoiding contact with your top vertebrae). Pull the bar down onto your shoulders to
  2. fix it in place. Keep your head up and maintain the natural curve of your spine.
  3. Bend your knees to lower the weight as far as your flexibility allows. Keep your knees behind your toes as you go.
  4. Push through your heels to stand up and repeat.

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Paige Hathaway

3 hours 47 minutes ago

Who runs the world? 🙋🏼‍♀️🙋🏼‍♀️ Sweet Sweat
Well... YOU DO IF YOU CHOOSE TOO!

Only YOU are in control of your future. What are you doing today to get yourself closer to your goals...? ✨ #grindtime

Paige Hathaway

2 days 2 hours ago

She was a true fighter..

You could see it in her eyes. She wasn’t born strong.. She was built strong. She didn’t come from the perfect home and even tho it may seem she were in the most favorable current situation, things were far from perfect. Despite her past, She kept her heart beautiful but her fight tough. She was focused, handling her own business and she made a decision to do more than just survive using courage, hard work and consistency.

Somedays she had no idea how she’d do it but she never made excuses or gave up and even when she failed, she got right back up. She learned that the hardest times in life were when she was transitioning from one version of herself to another.

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November 2017
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