Tag Archive | "fitness"

Running tips to push your limits

Do you love running? Are you the queen of the 5K and maybe even the 10K too? So what’s next – a half or full marathon tickle your fancy? After all, if you can run 5K or 10K successfully, what’s to say you can’t tackle a longer distance with the right training? Running your first ever long-distance race is a pretty incredible feeling. You train, you run and you realise that the adrenaline that comes with completing a longer distance is really something special.

 

And with so many exciting races on the running calendar this year, there’s a /lot/ for runners to look forward to, whatever their level. ‘Obstacle races are continuing to grow in popularity. They are appealing to a new audience as well as seasoned runners, because of their stop-start nature, and focus on fun and teamwork. Ultras are also really popular, as more marathon runners are realising that going “beyond” may well be possible,’ says running coach George Anderson (runningbygeorge.com).

 

If you’ve set your mind on going the distance, you have to be as mentally prepared as you are physically. We’ve put together our top solutions to common problems runners face to help you smash your goals.

 

Problem 1: Boredom

Training can be tough, but the right music will psyche you up for your run, giving you the motivation you need to slip on your trainers and head out the door. ‘Running the same route every time can get a bit tedious. If you get bored when you’re on a long run, plug yourself into an upbeat playlist, run with a friend, or just pick a brand new route each time,’ suggests George.

Problem 2: Lack of motivation

Variety is the spice of life, so if you’re running the same training course or wearing the same gear each session no wonder you’re not excited to run! Regularly varying your routes for a change of scenery and splashing out on new gear will inspire you to get outside. ‘Having your /why/ firmly at the front of your mind when you are training for a particular event can also keep your motivation high. In between races, try running without a watch. “Freedom Runs” are a great way to reconnect with your running and remind you of the reason you fell in love with the sport in the first place,’ says George.

 

Problem 3: Injury niggles

From shin splints to knee pain, injuries are often part and parcel of a runner’s life, but strengthening your weak spots can work as an effective preventative measure. ‘Injuries are the bane of the runner’s life. Avoid unnecessary niggles by investing in a regular strength and conditioning routine. Single leg squats, spine mobilisers and hip bridges will all help bulletproof your body,’ George says.

 

Problem 4: Bad weather

While in Britain we’re all used to wind, rain and sun, the unpredictable weather can be a massive hurdle for runners. When the weather isn’t playing ball it can be tempting to skip a training session, but keeping your end goal in mind will help you to maintain focus. ‘A bit of wet and cold shouldn’t mean a cancelled session, but if the weather isn’t up to scratch, take your workout indoors. While treadmills aren’t the best way to train for a race, they can be extremely handy when you can’t get out onto the roads because of miserable weather conditions,’ says George.

 

Problem 5: Too tired

Training is tiring. Fact. And when your body can’t handle another training session you’re at a higher risk of injury. If you haven’t slept, feel light-headed and weak, it’s your brain’s way of communicating that your body is not ready for a hardcore workout that day. But don’t beat yourself up over it – just remember that allowing your body adequate rest will improve your overall performance in the long run.

Problem 6: No time

With our increasingly busy lifestyles, it’s not always easy to fit in those all-important training sessions. Put exercise high up on your priority list and block out time in your diary at the beginning of the week so that you schedule other events around your training rather than the other way round – and don’t worry if you don’t have time to run every single day. ‘Training for a 10K, half or full marathon immediately conjures up ideas of long hours spent trudging the roads several times a week. This can be enough to put some runners off before they even start, but if you focus on quality rather than quantity, including just three runs a week, you will still get great results. This makes it a much more practical programme, and also reduces the chances of over-training and injuries,’ explains George.

 

Problem 7: Performance plateau

Can’t seem to go that extra mile or shave off seconds from your current PB? Consistency and commitment is key to powering up your performance. And making sure you continually push yourself hard will help you take your running game to the next level. ‘Training your body through threshold workouts can be really effective,’ says George. ‘Holding your pace at a point where the intensity becomes “comfortably uncomfortable” for increasingly longer periods of time through a programme can have an incredible impact on your fitness. Your body becomes better adapted to dealing with lactic acid, making faster running feel easier,’ he adds. 

5 ways to amp up running success

Try George’s expert tricks to better your run

 

1 Follow a programme

If you have a race coming up, make sure you have a structured programme to follow with specific weekly targets to reach.

 

2 Be organised

Make an appointment with yourself for your training. Trying to fit it in isn’t likely to be a good long-term strategy, but if it’s there in the diary, it’ll happen.

 

3 Mix up your training 

Running at the same pace all the time will get you /some/ results, but you’ll never reach your full potential. Mix in intervals, hills and threshold runs for the best results.

 

4 Strength and conditioning

It’s the bit that most runners ignore – until they get injured. Not only does strength training make you a stronger, faster runner, it reduces the number of runs you have to skip because you’re out of action with avoidable injuries.

5 Connect with other runners 

Running may be an individual sport, but there’s lots to be gained from connecting with others. Sharing stories, asking for advice and finding motivation are all good reasons for joining a coaching group.

Read this article:

Running tips to push your limits

Posted in Bodybuilding, Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight lossComments (0)

Running tips to push your limits

Do you love running? Are you the queen of the 5K and maybe even the 10K too? So what’s next – a half or full marathon tickle your fancy? After all, if you can run 5K or 10K successfully, what’s to say you can’t tackle a longer distance with the right training? Running your first ever long-distance race is a pretty incredible feeling. You train, you run and you realise that the adrenaline that comes with completing a longer distance is really something special.

 

And with so many exciting races on the running calendar this year, there’s a /lot/ for runners to look forward to, whatever their level. ‘Obstacle races are continuing to grow in popularity. They are appealing to a new audience as well as seasoned runners, because of their stop-start nature, and focus on fun and teamwork. Ultras are also really popular, as more marathon runners are realising that going “beyond” may well be possible,’ says running coach George Anderson (runningbygeorge.com).

 

If you’ve set your mind on going the distance, you have to be as mentally prepared as you are physically. We’ve put together our top solutions to common problems runners face to help you smash your goals.

 

Problem 1: Boredom

Training can be tough, but the right music will psyche you up for your run, giving you the motivation you need to slip on your trainers and head out the door. ‘Running the same route every time can get a bit tedious. If you get bored when you’re on a long run, plug yourself into an upbeat playlist, run with a friend, or just pick a brand new route each time,’ suggests George.

Problem 2: Lack of motivation

Variety is the spice of life, so if you’re running the same training course or wearing the same gear each session no wonder you’re not excited to run! Regularly varying your routes for a change of scenery and splashing out on new gear will inspire you to get outside. ‘Having your /why/ firmly at the front of your mind when you are training for a particular event can also keep your motivation high. In between races, try running without a watch. “Freedom Runs” are a great way to reconnect with your running and remind you of the reason you fell in love with the sport in the first place,’ says George.

 

Problem 3: Injury niggles

From shin splints to knee pain, injuries are often part and parcel of a runner’s life, but strengthening your weak spots can work as an effective preventative measure. ‘Injuries are the bane of the runner’s life. Avoid unnecessary niggles by investing in a regular strength and conditioning routine. Single leg squats, spine mobilisers and hip bridges will all help bulletproof your body,’ George says.

 

Problem 4: Bad weather

While in Britain we’re all used to wind, rain and sun, the unpredictable weather can be a massive hurdle for runners. When the weather isn’t playing ball it can be tempting to skip a training session, but keeping your end goal in mind will help you to maintain focus. ‘A bit of wet and cold shouldn’t mean a cancelled session, but if the weather isn’t up to scratch, take your workout indoors. While treadmills aren’t the best way to train for a race, they can be extremely handy when you can’t get out onto the roads because of miserable weather conditions,’ says George.

 

Problem 5: Too tired

Training is tiring. Fact. And when your body can’t handle another training session you’re at a higher risk of injury. If you haven’t slept, feel light-headed and weak, it’s your brain’s way of communicating that your body is not ready for a hardcore workout that day. But don’t beat yourself up over it – just remember that allowing your body adequate rest will improve your overall performance in the long run.

Problem 6: No time

With our increasingly busy lifestyles, it’s not always easy to fit in those all-important training sessions. Put exercise high up on your priority list and block out time in your diary at the beginning of the week so that you schedule other events around your training rather than the other way round – and don’t worry if you don’t have time to run every single day. ‘Training for a 10K, half or full marathon immediately conjures up ideas of long hours spent trudging the roads several times a week. This can be enough to put some runners off before they even start, but if you focus on quality rather than quantity, including just three runs a week, you will still get great results. This makes it a much more practical programme, and also reduces the chances of over-training and injuries,’ explains George.

 

Problem 7: Performance plateau

Can’t seem to go that extra mile or shave off seconds from your current PB? Consistency and commitment is key to powering up your performance. And making sure you continually push yourself hard will help you take your running game to the next level. ‘Training your body through threshold workouts can be really effective,’ says George. ‘Holding your pace at a point where the intensity becomes “comfortably uncomfortable” for increasingly longer periods of time through a programme can have an incredible impact on your fitness. Your body becomes better adapted to dealing with lactic acid, making faster running feel easier,’ he adds. 

5 ways to amp up running success

Try George’s expert tricks to better your run

 

1 Follow a programme

If you have a race coming up, make sure you have a structured programme to follow with specific weekly targets to reach.

 

2 Be organised

Make an appointment with yourself for your training. Trying to fit it in isn’t likely to be a good long-term strategy, but if it’s there in the diary, it’ll happen.

 

3 Mix up your training 

Running at the same pace all the time will get you /some/ results, but you’ll never reach your full potential. Mix in intervals, hills and threshold runs for the best results.

 

4 Strength and conditioning

It’s the bit that most runners ignore – until they get injured. Not only does strength training make you a stronger, faster runner, it reduces the number of runs you have to skip because you’re out of action with avoidable injuries.

5 Connect with other runners 

Running may be an individual sport, but there’s lots to be gained from connecting with others. Sharing stories, asking for advice and finding motivation are all good reasons for joining a coaching group.

View post – 

Running tips to push your limits

Posted in Bodybuilding, Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Health Issues, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight lossComments (0)

Make Exercise a Habit

We all know that regular exercise is good for us, but actually putting that knowledge into practice isn’t always easy. While we may take out expensive gym memberships, splash the cash on new running gear and high-tech kit in a bid to feel healthier and slimmer, staying committed for the long haul is another thing. No matter how serious we are about achieving our goals or how good our intentions, our get-fit resolutions can often slip off our to-do-list.

 

Need some motivation to recharge your get-up-and-go? Health and wellness coach Joanne Henson dedicates her new book to doing just that. What’s Your Excuse For Not Getting Fit? (£4.99, amazon.co.uk) provides easy-to-follow advice and smart tips to stick with exercise long enough to see some pretty awesome results. ‘I wrote the book to help people take a fresh look at their own self-sabotaging behaviours and limiting beliefs, and to motivate them to change their mindsets, and move forward,’ she explains. Here she shares the top reasons for skipping that all-important workout and her simple solutions to stay on track.

 

Excuse 1: I don’t have time to exercise

Workouts don’t necessarily have to be lengthy or laborious if you’re looking to lose weight or get healthier. A short, sharp sweat sesh will see you bid farewell to hundreds of calories while targeting a whole range of different muscle groups. ‘Three to four times per week is ideal – this still leaves another three to four days a week when you don’t have to exercise. High-intensity interval training sessions could be as short as 10 minutes, and the best way to ensure that it gets done is to prioritise and diarise. And if you think you don’t have time, try keeping a log of how you spend your time and re-evaluate what’s important,’ says Joanne.

 

 

Excuse 2: I live too far away from the gym

Brrrr! When it’s freezing cold and chucking it down outside you’d probably prefer a date with your duvet over dragging yourself all the way to the gym – especially if it involves an epic commute. We get it. Even those of us with the loftiest intentions can falter when inconvenience prevails over our fitness plans. ‘There’s no point in joining a flash new gym if it’s a 15-minute drive away, which you might not fancy after a long day at work. Much better to join the more basic gym at the end of your road. Then you’ve only got to find time for the workout, not the workout and a journey,’ says Joanne. Gym still not near enough? Try out a range of fitness DVDs and apps that fit easily into your lifestyle.

 

 

Excuse 3: I’ve lost my fitness mojo

Having motivational dips every so often is normal, and if that means you miss a few sessions, so be it – but don’t let that derail you getting back on track. ‘If you do skip a few workouts, remember that the longer you leave it the harder it’s going to feel when you go back. And consider how far you’ve already come – do you really want to waste the effort you’ve already put in? Capitalise on the progress you’ve made so far and stick with it,’ advises Joanne.

 

 

Excuse 4: I find exercise boring

Exercise doesn’t have to be difficult and unpleasant. Ease yourself into it and up the ante when you’re ready. ‘Find something you enjoy. This is an obvious one, but so many people treat exercise as a form of punishment, as something to be endured not enjoyed. But there are dozens of different forms of exercise which you might find more fun, from dancing to rock climbing,’ says Joanne. And if you get bored of your routine, switch things up a notch by trying new classes, working out different body parts and varying the intensity of your workout.

 

 

Excuse 5: I’m not seeing results

Let’s be realistic; you won’t see results overnight, but the more dedicated you become, the faster you’ll see improvements in your overall fitness /and/ your figure. ‘Be patient, give it some time, and remember that exercise has long-term, ongoing health benefits beyond body shape,’ says Joanne. Try keeping a workout journal so you can chart your progress, writing down small achievements after every session, whether it’s going for two minutes longer on the treadmill or reaching your PB in press-ups.

 

 

Achieve your best-ever results

Try Joanne’s shortcuts to help you stay on track.

 

1 Make exercise a priority

If you treat exercise as an afterthought, and put it at the bottom of your list after checking Facebook, drinks after work and binge-watching a box set, you’ll run out of time every day.  However, if you schedule a workout into your day and plan your other activities around it, it /will/ get done.

 

2 Don’t expect miraculous results

One of the reasons people go so hard at first and then give up so quickly is that they are looking for a quick fix, and when they don’t get one, they become disillusioned. In fact, you’re not going to undo months or years of unhealthy living with a month of exercise, nor are you going to dramatically change your body shape in that time. But be patient, give it some time, and you will see results.

 

3 Make sure you’re doing it right

If you have a specific goal, and you’re going to invest time and effort in exercising, make sure that time and effort is well spent. What is it you want to achieve?  Be honest with yourself and then, if necessary, get some advice on what would be most effective (e.g. if you want to tone up your bingo wings, target that area with resistance training rather than going running).  

 

 

Get-started kit

Make a trolley dash for these must-have fitness buys

 

Blackspade Thermal Sports Top

Defy the cold weather with this insulating top. It’s super-breathable, lightweight and moisture-wicking.

£20.95, amazon.co.uk

 

Anita Active Air Control Sports Bra

A good sports bra is an essential investment for every budding fitness enthusiast. This stylist number by Anita Active minimises bounce whilst maximising comfort.

£51, figleaves.com

 

Adidas Supernova Glide BOOST

Keep morale and performance at an all-time high with these sleek running shoes. Designed to complement the shape of your foot, they also offer good grip and ultra-soft cushioning.

£105, adidas.co.uk

View original post here – 

Make Exercise a Habit

Posted in Bodybuilding, Diets, Fitness Equipment, Health Issues, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight lossComments (0)

Judy Murrays top tennis tips and drills

With Wimbledon fever upon us, we’re itching to get out and hit a few balls! But rather than mindlessly slogging the ball backwards and forwards with a friend, why not work on perfecting your technique? H&F chief sub Emma Lewis got to meet the highly experienced coach, Fed Cup team captain and, of course, mum to Andy and Jamie. Here are three simple drills guaranteed to make you think about what you do with that racquet!

 

1)   ‘Practise throwing a beanbag to a partner who’s standing a couple of metres away to catch on their racquet head. They then throw it back to you to catch on your racquet head. Build this up so you then swing the racquet with the beanbag on it to send it back to your partner. This helps build racquet-head control.’

2)   ‘Place several cones or markers of some sort, all around one side of the court. Start at the notch in the middle of the baseline and, holding your racquet, sidestep to your right to a marker and take a pretend shot, then back to the start point, then run diagonally forwards to another marker, taking a pretend shot, then backwards to the start and so on. Time it over the course of the holiday and see if you can get faster at it. This helps you improve your movement around the court and you’ll be practising different types of shots too.’

3)   ‘Put a tennis ball in a sock and grip the open end. Practise throwing the ball and sock, starting with it over your shoulder down your back and throwing forwards with a straight arm in a service action. We don’t do much with our arms above our heads, so this helps build up those serving muscles and improve your technique.’

HEAD ambassador, Judy Murray was speaking at a HEAD UK tennis master-class supported by Living Tennis – for more information go to www.head.com/tennis orwww.livingtennis.co.uk

For more top tennis tips from Judy Murray, buy Health & Fitness Summer issue, out now…’

Originally posted here – 

Judy Murrays top tennis tips and drills

Posted in Diets, Fitness Equipment, Health Issues, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight lossComments (0)

Mix it up to shed those bingo wings!

Do you often feel there just aren’t enough hours in the day, especially when it comes to fitting exercise in?

If so, then you’ll want to know about the latest workouts on the block: combo classes. As the name suggests, these classes combine the best of two different workout styles in one session. Not only do you get a double whammy of a workout, but fusing two different styles of exercise together is also a great way to banish boredom. Plus, by mixing two workouts together you’ll be working on your all-round fitness rather than just one area, which makes them good value for money, too! From dancing to kettlebells, we’ve got it all. Fancy giving one a try? Check out our pick of the best of the combos out there.

KettleCore

What is it? A super-intense class with Pilates on the reformer and kettlebell training in the middle – perfect for gym-goers who have Pilates experience, as well as a fairly good level of fitness. ‘Combining the reformer and kettlebell workout in one class offers a total-body workout with cardio, strengthening and toning elements,’ says Heartcore founder Jess Schuring.

Why do it? If you have more fat than time to burn, this class allows you to blitz that excess without dedicating hours to the gym. You can expect strength increases from the kettlebells, flexibility and lengthening benefits from the Pilates and a great cardio workout – this is a high-intensity class so you’ll really get your heart rate up. 

Try it: £27,
heartcore.co.uk

Nova

What is it? Yoga and Pilates combos have been done before. But Nova adds an upbeat tempo with choreography to music, creating a fun, high-energy class. ‘This fusion class can be less intimidating than the more traditional concepts of yoga and Pilates,’ says Gillian Reeves, national group exercise manager at Virgin Active UK.

Why do it? Not only will you have to work hard to adapt to the moves, but you’ll benefit from improved flexibility, focus and balance from the yoga, and improved coordination and muscle tone from the Pilates. ‘It also maximises mobility by getting your body to move in multiple directions, encouraging agility,’ adds Gillian.

Try it: Classes are only available to Virgin Active members. Membership starts from £40, virginactive.co.uk

Yogabomb

What is it? It’s hard to imagine an effective fat-burning workout teamed with the relaxing and unwinding elements of yoga, but Yogabomb from Hiitgirl has it nailed it. ‘We get sweaty for 13 minutes with burpees, tuck jumps and side leaps, going full throttle with 40 seconds of work followed by 20 seconds of rest,’ explains Genny Wilkinson-Priest, the yoga ambassador at Hiitgirl and co-creator of Yogabomb. ‘There is a two-minute yoga resting pose on the mat where we shift focus, then practise yoga for the next 15 minutes, working on balancing postures as well as strength-based and muscle-extending ones.’

Why do it? ‘The yoga portion of the class is designed to lengthen the muscles that are strengthened in the HIIT portion,’ Genny says. ‘But beyond the physical level, Yogabomb challenges the mind through your willpower and determination.’ If you want an all-round approach to fitness, book yourself in. 

Try it: £20, hiitgirl.com

Frame Barre

What is it? Exercises from the gym floor and dance floor fused into one amazing total-body cardio workout. ‘By mixing ballet and fitness in one class, you get the best of both worlds,’ says Pip Black, co-founder of Frame. ‘We’ve formatted the class so that it includes the perfect amount of floor work, barre work, arms, abs and glutes.’ Don’t worry if you don’t know your plié from your arabesque, though, this class is just as suitable for beginners as it is for former prima ballerinas.

Why do it? If you’re envious of those gorgeously slim and slender ballerina bodies or guilty of neglecting your flexibility, then you need to try this class for yourself. ‘The fitness element means that you’ll get your heart rate up for a fair portion of the class, as well as burn calories,’ Pip adds.

Try it: £15, moveyourframe.com

Barry’s Bootcamp

What is it? A classic combo of strength and cardio using resistance training and the treadmill. ‘Lifting, and running isn’t rocket science, but Barry’s combines the two in a fun and supportive environment,’ says Anya Lahiri, celebrity trainer at Barry’s Bootcamp, London. ‘The red lights and night club setting are an added bonus!’

Why do it? It’s a tough workout, that’s for sure, but getting both strength and fitness done and dusted in one hour is pretty appealing. ‘Fusing together strength and cardio effectively turns your body into a calorie and fat-burning furnace and also increases bone density,’ Anya explains. And the best part is, you push yourself as far as you can take yourself, so the class can challenge a beginner through to an athlete.

Try it: £20, barrysbootcamp.com

BollyActive

What is it? Pineapple Dance Studios is famous for its huge array of classes, so it’s the place to visit if you want to sculpt a dancer’s body. BollyActive is one of Pineapple’s fitness-based classes, so you can benefit whether you’re a pro or have two left feet. ‘BollyActive follows the basic principles of targeting fitness, core strength and the heart in a fun and healthy way through using interval and aerobic training with the fast and slow tempo of Bollywood dance steps,’ says BollyActive teacher Urvashi Patel. ‘It incorporates fun party rhythms and killer moves.’

Why do it? The choreography works wonders for coordination, but the fitness burns cals, too. ‘The class was born from feedback from clients,’ says Urvashi. ‘They wanted to dance, enjoy music and stay fit and active while having fun, without having to attend a serious dance class.’

Try it: £6,
pineapple.uk.com 

Excerpt from: 

Mix it up to shed those bingo wings!

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight lossComments (0)

Judy Murrays top tennis tips and drills

With Wimbledon fever upon us, we’re itching to get out and hit a few balls! But rather than mindlessly slogging the ball backwards and forwards with a friend, why not work on perfecting your technique? H&F chief sub Emma Lewis got to meet the highly experienced coach, Fed Cup team captain and, of course, mum to Andy and Jamie. Here are three simple drills guaranteed to make you think about what you do with that racquet!

 

1)   ‘Practise throwing a beanbag to a partner who’s standing a couple of metres away to catch on their racquet head. They then throw it back to you to catch on your racquet head. Build this up so you then swing the racquet with the beanbag on it to send it back to your partner. This helps build racquet-head control.’

2)   ‘Place several cones or markers of some sort, all around one side of the court. Start at the notch in the middle of the baseline and, holding your racquet, sidestep to your right to a marker and take a pretend shot, then back to the start point, then run diagonally forwards to another marker, taking a pretend shot, then backwards to the start and so on. Time it over the course of the holiday and see if you can get faster at it. This helps you improve your movement around the court and you’ll be practising different types of shots too.’

3)   ‘Put a tennis ball in a sock and grip the open end. Practise throwing the ball and sock, starting with it over your shoulder down your back and throwing forwards with a straight arm in a service action. We don’t do much with our arms above our heads, so this helps build up those serving muscles and improve your technique.’

HEAD ambassador, Judy Murray was speaking at a HEAD UK tennis master-class supported by Living Tennis – for more information go to www.head.com/tennis orwww.livingtennis.co.uk

For more top tennis tips from Judy Murray, buy Health & Fitness Summer issue, out now…’

Read the article:  

Judy Murrays top tennis tips and drills

Posted in Bodybuilding, Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight lossComments (0)

Mix it up to shed those bingo wings!

Do you often feel there just aren’t enough hours in the day, especially when it comes to fitting exercise in?

If so, then you’ll want to know about the latest workouts on the block: combo classes. As the name suggests, these classes combine the best of two different workout styles in one session. Not only do you get a double whammy of a workout, but fusing two different styles of exercise together is also a great way to banish boredom. Plus, by mixing two workouts together you’ll be working on your all-round fitness rather than just one area, which makes them good value for money, too! From dancing to kettlebells, we’ve got it all. Fancy giving one a try? Check out our pick of the best of the combos out there.

KettleCore

What is it? A super-intense class with Pilates on the reformer and kettlebell training in the middle – perfect for gym-goers who have Pilates experience, as well as a fairly good level of fitness. ‘Combining the reformer and kettlebell workout in one class offers a total-body workout with cardio, strengthening and toning elements,’ says Heartcore founder Jess Schuring.

Why do it? If you have more fat than time to burn, this class allows you to blitz that excess without dedicating hours to the gym. You can expect strength increases from the kettlebells, flexibility and lengthening benefits from the Pilates and a great cardio workout – this is a high-intensity class so you’ll really get your heart rate up. 

Try it: £27,
heartcore.co.uk

Nova

What is it? Yoga and Pilates combos have been done before. But Nova adds an upbeat tempo with choreography to music, creating a fun, high-energy class. ‘This fusion class can be less intimidating than the more traditional concepts of yoga and Pilates,’ says Gillian Reeves, national group exercise manager at Virgin Active UK.

Why do it? Not only will you have to work hard to adapt to the moves, but you’ll benefit from improved flexibility, focus and balance from the yoga, and improved coordination and muscle tone from the Pilates. ‘It also maximises mobility by getting your body to move in multiple directions, encouraging agility,’ adds Gillian.

Try it: Classes are only available to Virgin Active members. Membership starts from £40, virginactive.co.uk

Yogabomb

What is it? It’s hard to imagine an effective fat-burning workout teamed with the relaxing and unwinding elements of yoga, but Yogabomb from Hiitgirl has it nailed it. ‘We get sweaty for 13 minutes with burpees, tuck jumps and side leaps, going full throttle with 40 seconds of work followed by 20 seconds of rest,’ explains Genny Wilkinson-Priest, the yoga ambassador at Hiitgirl and co-creator of Yogabomb. ‘There is a two-minute yoga resting pose on the mat where we shift focus, then practise yoga for the next 15 minutes, working on balancing postures as well as strength-based and muscle-extending ones.’

Why do it? ‘The yoga portion of the class is designed to lengthen the muscles that are strengthened in the HIIT portion,’ Genny says. ‘But beyond the physical level, Yogabomb challenges the mind through your willpower and determination.’ If you want an all-round approach to fitness, book yourself in. 

Try it: £20, hiitgirl.com

Frame Barre

What is it? Exercises from the gym floor and dance floor fused into one amazing total-body cardio workout. ‘By mixing ballet and fitness in one class, you get the best of both worlds,’ says Pip Black, co-founder of Frame. ‘We’ve formatted the class so that it includes the perfect amount of floor work, barre work, arms, abs and glutes.’ Don’t worry if you don’t know your plié from your arabesque, though, this class is just as suitable for beginners as it is for former prima ballerinas.

Why do it? If you’re envious of those gorgeously slim and slender ballerina bodies or guilty of neglecting your flexibility, then you need to try this class for yourself. ‘The fitness element means that you’ll get your heart rate up for a fair portion of the class, as well as burn calories,’ Pip adds.

Try it: £15, moveyourframe.com

Barry’s Bootcamp

What is it? A classic combo of strength and cardio using resistance training and the treadmill. ‘Lifting, and running isn’t rocket science, but Barry’s combines the two in a fun and supportive environment,’ says Anya Lahiri, celebrity trainer at Barry’s Bootcamp, London. ‘The red lights and night club setting are an added bonus!’

Why do it? It’s a tough workout, that’s for sure, but getting both strength and fitness done and dusted in one hour is pretty appealing. ‘Fusing together strength and cardio effectively turns your body into a calorie and fat-burning furnace and also increases bone density,’ Anya explains. And the best part is, you push yourself as far as you can take yourself, so the class can challenge a beginner through to an athlete.

Try it: £20, barrysbootcamp.com

BollyActive

What is it? Pineapple Dance Studios is famous for its huge array of classes, so it’s the place to visit if you want to sculpt a dancer’s body. BollyActive is one of Pineapple’s fitness-based classes, so you can benefit whether you’re a pro or have two left feet. ‘BollyActive follows the basic principles of targeting fitness, core strength and the heart in a fun and healthy way through using interval and aerobic training with the fast and slow tempo of Bollywood dance steps,’ says BollyActive teacher Urvashi Patel. ‘It incorporates fun party rhythms and killer moves.’

Why do it? The choreography works wonders for coordination, but the fitness burns cals, too. ‘The class was born from feedback from clients,’ says Urvashi. ‘They wanted to dance, enjoy music and stay fit and active while having fun, without having to attend a serious dance class.’

Try it: £6,
pineapple.uk.com 

Link: 

Mix it up to shed those bingo wings!

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight lossComments (0)

Mix it up to shed those bingo wings!

Do you often feel there just aren’t enough hours in the day, especially when it comes to fitting exercise in?

If so, then you’ll want to know about the latest workouts on the block: combo classes. As the name suggests, these classes combine the best of two different workout styles in one session. Not only do you get a double whammy of a workout, but fusing two different styles of exercise together is also a great way to banish boredom. Plus, by mixing two workouts together you’ll be working on your all-round fitness rather than just one area, which makes them good value for money, too! From dancing to kettlebells, we’ve got it all. Fancy giving one a try? Check out our pick of the best of the combos out there.

KettleCore

What is it? A super-intense class with Pilates on the reformer and kettlebell training in the middle – perfect for gym-goers who have Pilates experience, as well as a fairly good level of fitness. ‘Combining the reformer and kettlebell workout in one class offers a total-body workout with cardio, strengthening and toning elements,’ says Heartcore founder Jess Schuring.

Why do it? If you have more fat than time to burn, this class allows you to blitz that excess without dedicating hours to the gym. You can expect strength increases from the kettlebells, flexibility and lengthening benefits from the Pilates and a great cardio workout – this is a high-intensity class so you’ll really get your heart rate up. 

Try it: £27,
heartcore.co.uk

Nova

What is it? Yoga and Pilates combos have been done before. But Nova adds an upbeat tempo with choreography to music, creating a fun, high-energy class. ‘This fusion class can be less intimidating than the more traditional concepts of yoga and Pilates,’ says Gillian Reeves, national group exercise manager at Virgin Active UK.

Why do it? Not only will you have to work hard to adapt to the moves, but you’ll benefit from improved flexibility, focus and balance from the yoga, and improved coordination and muscle tone from the Pilates. ‘It also maximises mobility by getting your body to move in multiple directions, encouraging agility,’ adds Gillian.

Try it: Classes are only available to Virgin Active members. Membership starts from £40, virginactive.co.uk

Yogabomb

What is it? It’s hard to imagine an effective fat-burning workout teamed with the relaxing and unwinding elements of yoga, but Yogabomb from Hiitgirl has it nailed it. ‘We get sweaty for 13 minutes with burpees, tuck jumps and side leaps, going full throttle with 40 seconds of work followed by 20 seconds of rest,’ explains Genny Wilkinson-Priest, the yoga ambassador at Hiitgirl and co-creator of Yogabomb. ‘There is a two-minute yoga resting pose on the mat where we shift focus, then practise yoga for the next 15 minutes, working on balancing postures as well as strength-based and muscle-extending ones.’

Why do it? ‘The yoga portion of the class is designed to lengthen the muscles that are strengthened in the HIIT portion,’ Genny says. ‘But beyond the physical level, Yogabomb challenges the mind through your willpower and determination.’ If you want an all-round approach to fitness, book yourself in. 

Try it: £20, hiitgirl.com

Frame Barre

What is it? Exercises from the gym floor and dance floor fused into one amazing total-body cardio workout. ‘By mixing ballet and fitness in one class, you get the best of both worlds,’ says Pip Black, co-founder of Frame. ‘We’ve formatted the class so that it includes the perfect amount of floor work, barre work, arms, abs and glutes.’ Don’t worry if you don’t know your plié from your arabesque, though, this class is just as suitable for beginners as it is for former prima ballerinas.

Why do it? If you’re envious of those gorgeously slim and slender ballerina bodies or guilty of neglecting your flexibility, then you need to try this class for yourself. ‘The fitness element means that you’ll get your heart rate up for a fair portion of the class, as well as burn calories,’ Pip adds.

Try it: £15, moveyourframe.com

Barry’s Bootcamp

What is it? A classic combo of strength and cardio using resistance training and the treadmill. ‘Lifting, and running isn’t rocket science, but Barry’s combines the two in a fun and supportive environment,’ says Anya Lahiri, celebrity trainer at Barry’s Bootcamp, London. ‘The red lights and night club setting are an added bonus!’

Why do it? It’s a tough workout, that’s for sure, but getting both strength and fitness done and dusted in one hour is pretty appealing. ‘Fusing together strength and cardio effectively turns your body into a calorie and fat-burning furnace and also increases bone density,’ Anya explains. And the best part is, you push yourself as far as you can take yourself, so the class can challenge a beginner through to an athlete.

Try it: £20, barrysbootcamp.com

BollyActive

What is it? Pineapple Dance Studios is famous for its huge array of classes, so it’s the place to visit if you want to sculpt a dancer’s body. BollyActive is one of Pineapple’s fitness-based classes, so you can benefit whether you’re a pro or have two left feet. ‘BollyActive follows the basic principles of targeting fitness, core strength and the heart in a fun and healthy way through using interval and aerobic training with the fast and slow tempo of Bollywood dance steps,’ says BollyActive teacher Urvashi Patel. ‘It incorporates fun party rhythms and killer moves.’

Why do it? The choreography works wonders for coordination, but the fitness burns cals, too. ‘The class was born from feedback from clients,’ says Urvashi. ‘They wanted to dance, enjoy music and stay fit and active while having fun, without having to attend a serious dance class.’

Try it: £6,
pineapple.uk.com 

View the original here – 

Mix it up to shed those bingo wings!

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight lossComments (0)

Judy Murrays top tennis tips and drills

With Wimbledon fever upon us, we’re itching to get out and hit a few balls! But rather than mindlessly slogging the ball backwards and forwards with a friend, why not work on perfecting your technique? H&F chief sub Emma Lewis got to meet the highly experienced coach, Fed Cup team captain and, of course, mum to Andy and Jamie. Here are three simple drills guaranteed to make you think about what you do with that racquet!

 

1)   ‘Practise throwing a beanbag to a partner who’s standing a couple of metres away to catch on their racquet head. They then throw it back to you to catch on your racquet head. Build this up so you then swing the racquet with the beanbag on it to send it back to your partner. This helps build racquet-head control.’

2)   ‘Place several cones or markers of some sort, all around one side of the court. Start at the notch in the middle of the baseline and, holding your racquet, sidestep to your right to a marker and take a pretend shot, then back to the start point, then run diagonally forwards to another marker, taking a pretend shot, then backwards to the start and so on. Time it over the course of the holiday and see if you can get faster at it. This helps you improve your movement around the court and you’ll be practising different types of shots too.’

3)   ‘Put a tennis ball in a sock and grip the open end. Practise throwing the ball and sock, starting with it over your shoulder down your back and throwing forwards with a straight arm in a service action. We don’t do much with our arms above our heads, so this helps build up those serving muscles and improve your technique.’

HEAD ambassador, Judy Murray was speaking at a HEAD UK tennis master-class supported by Living Tennis – for more information go to www.head.com/tennis orwww.livingtennis.co.uk

For more top tennis tips from Judy Murray, buy Health & Fitness Summer issue, out now…’

Link to original – 

Judy Murrays top tennis tips and drills

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight lossComments (0)

Judy Murrays top tennis tips and drills

With Wimbledon fever upon us, we’re itching to get out and hit a few balls! But rather than mindlessly slogging the ball backwards and forwards with a friend, why not work on perfecting your technique? H&F chief sub Emma Lewis got to meet the highly experienced coach, Fed Cup team captain and, of course, mum to Andy and Jamie. Here are three simple drills guaranteed to make you think about what you do with that racquet!

 

1)   ‘Practise throwing a beanbag to a partner who’s standing a couple of metres away to catch on their racquet head. They then throw it back to you to catch on your racquet head. Build this up so you then swing the racquet with the beanbag on it to send it back to your partner. This helps build racquet-head control.’

2)   ‘Place several cones or markers of some sort, all around one side of the court. Start at the notch in the middle of the baseline and, holding your racquet, sidestep to your right to a marker and take a pretend shot, then back to the start point, then run diagonally forwards to another marker, taking a pretend shot, then backwards to the start and so on. Time it over the course of the holiday and see if you can get faster at it. This helps you improve your movement around the court and you’ll be practising different types of shots too.’

3)   ‘Put a tennis ball in a sock and grip the open end. Practise throwing the ball and sock, starting with it over your shoulder down your back and throwing forwards with a straight arm in a service action. We don’t do much with our arms above our heads, so this helps build up those serving muscles and improve your technique.’

HEAD ambassador, Judy Murray was speaking at a HEAD UK tennis master-class supported by Living Tennis – for more information go to www.head.com/tennis orwww.livingtennis.co.uk

For more top tennis tips from Judy Murray, buy Health & Fitness Summer issue, out now…’

Link to article: 

Judy Murrays top tennis tips and drills

Posted in Diets, Fitness Equipment, Health Issues, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight lossComments (0)

BlogUpp!

Archives

July 2015
M T W T F S S
« Jun    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  
Content Protected Using Blog Protector By: PcDrome.