Tag Archive | "fitness"

Attacking your workout like a ninja warrior

It’s no huge surprise that Jeremy Guarino won the first Buffalo Ninja Warrior contest in July. The Amherst gym owner is certified to teach yoga, CrossFit and personal training, and served four years in the Marine Corps Special Forces.

More surprising is the wide collection of fellow enthusiasts in Western New York who have locked on to one of the nation’s newest fitness trends: obstacle course training.

The “American Ninja Warrior” program, which this week completed its sixth season on NBC, stokes the fire for those interested in this brand of fitness training, a mashup of several styles that focuses on functional body weight-resistance exercises that test balance, strength and stamina, agility, coordination and determination.

“You can’t have weaknesses,” said Patrick Hall, owner of a new downtown gym, Hybrid Fitness, that has become the first in the region to go all-in on the format.

Gym members include a former commercial airline pilot, a mental health counselor, an advertising company owner and a freelance writer. Hall is a veteran personal trainer and his wife, Julie, a mortgage loan officer who helps her husband keep his free-flowing obstacle ideas a bit more grounded – for members of all ages and abilities.

“We scale things” for beginner, intermediate and advance levels, said Hall, 37, who has appeared on the television show twice and been nicknamed the “Buffalo Spider Man,” because of his roots, his climbing prowess, and the tattoo on his left forearm.

Hybrid Gym, at 475 Ellicott St., tucked in the back of the Ellicott Commons, replaced Hall’s previous gym, 716 Fitness, on Delaware Avenue, which focused on weight training, muscle isolation workouts and old-style calisthenics. Once the obstacles were brought in, it became clear a move was in order.

“We were literally hitting our heads on the ceiling,” he said.

The new gym opened in March. Seven ropes, five Olympic gymnastics rings, five overhead bars, a pair of nunchucks and a spider web-style rope system hang over a gymnastics spring floor. Alongside it, Hall has sprinkled a collection of ramps and free weights, kettlebells and weighted balls, and PVC pipes of different widths and lengths. The words of the gym motto – Move Free – are painted over a mirror on one of the walls.

Guarino, 27, embodies the obstacle model. Strong, flexible and sinewy, his Build a Machine Fitness center on Niagara Falls Boulevard offers a mix of training styles that includes interval, circuit, Olympic weightlifting, small gymnastics, parkour and yoga. He excels on the “Salmon Ladder,” an obstacle that for many “American Ninja Warriors” contestants is the most challenging of them all.

Such balanced fitness is key to avoiding elimination during competitions, Hall said.

“You can’t have weakness because American Ninja courses expose weakness. You’ll see the guys who are very well built, bigger, go out on the balance exercises. The guys who are light run through the balance drills well but have a hard time with some of the strength stuff.”

Guarino isn’t alone when it comes to the thrill of the obstacle pursuit. Here’s a look at others who have started to master some of the obstacles at Hall’s gym:

1. Warped Wall Dave Kozak, 67, of Buffalo, a retired U.S. Air Force and Continental Airlines pilot, can take a running start and bound up a curved, 12-foot-high wall, gathering himself at the top. His children, who live in Colorado, interested him three years ago in a Spartan race – a 5-mile run pockmarked with 30 obstacles – and now he’s hooked. He plans to participate in a 13-mile Beast run in the coming weeks before he has his right hip replaced. As a pilot, good fitness was required to keep his military and commercial licenses. Over the years, he’s done weightlifting, biking, rope work and bodybuilding. “This might be my favorite,” said Kozak, who also is a member at LA Fitness.

2. Cliff Hanger Kevin Karn, 35, who owns a home-based advertising business in North Buffalo, is an avid rock climber who can bound from a small trampoline onto a wall covered with four angled 2-by-4s, climb his way to the top and then climb, by his fingertips, along a box-shaped wall about a dozen feet off the ground.

3. The Quad Steps In this staple of the television contest, four ramps are set diagonally across from each other at 6 feet, 2 inches apart, and the contestant must bound along all four without touching the ground. Karn worked to perfect this obstacle and is among several members at Hybrid Fitness who hope to compete in the televised competition.

4. Salmon Ladder Two sets of five posts – set at 35-degree angles and 4 feet apart, and climbing one foot at a time, pose what many competitors see as the most challenging obstacle in the gym. Competitors must take a broomstick-sized pole to climb the ladder, without taking their hands off the pole. “A lot of contestants fail on the ‘American Ninja Warriors’ show with the Salmon Ladder,” Hall said. “This often comes after several other obstacles, when your body is worn out.”

5. Cat Burglar A 10-foot-long PVC pipe, 3 inches in diameter, is perched along a stripped down power cage that’s topped with steel monkey bars. Christian Fisher, 42, of Niagara Falls, a freelance writer who specializes in self-help magazine articles and books, looks like a cat on this obstacle. You must climb the pipe, which can twist while you’re on it, then climb the monkey bars upside-down without touching the sides of the power cage, or a cargo net that dangles beneath the bars. “My focus in my writing is on mental fitness and personal growth. I wanted to take on a physical challenge,” said Fisher, who also trains using cardio, P90X and yoga.

6. Tarzan Traverse Alicia Moonan, 33, who owns a counseling business in Hamburg, has found obstacle training to help stay fit. She can make her way across six knotted ropes of varying lengths, set apart at varying distances.

7. Floating Bars Jessie Guilmette, 34, of Cheektowaga, is a Hybrid personal trainer and professional wrestler – with the ring name Pepper Parks – whose Empire State Wrestling matches appear regularly on cable and pay per view across parts of the Northeast. He’s also gone pro when it comes to swinging across five “floating bars” suspended 9 feet from the gym ceiling at varying heights, 3 to 4 feet apart. The bars can spin when they are grabbed, making the moves forward more challenging.

8. Forest of Rings Five Olympic rings hang at slightly varying heights about 9 feet off the gymnastics floor. They are spaced, randomly, 2 to 5 feet apart. Christina Mayer, 22, of Cheektowaga, a Hybrid personal trainer and group fitness instructor, can swing across them in less than 30 seconds. “The distance varies intentionally,” Hall said, “so you can’t get used to the swing.”

9. Jumping Spider Steffanie Rydzik, 23, of North Buffalo, working on her MBA and master’s degree in public health at the University at Buffalo, can bound over a large truck tire and personal-size trampoline, catch herself between two walls, slightly more than 4 feet apart, and then scurry up a 10-foot wall using her hands and feet.

10. Stone Swing Julie Hall, 34, swings on a rope and is required to land atop a 10-pound, circular free weight sitting atop a wide, wobbly piece of PVC pipe. This move requires strength, agility and good balance.

11. Spool Walking Patrick Hall recently called an electrical company looking to find out if they had large wire spools they no longer needed. When he asked if he could buy one, and told the company why, he was given a spool compliments of the owner, a fellow “American Ninja Warrior” fan. Contestants in the Buffalo Ninja Warrior competition will need to walk on the spool for 15 feet without falling off.

12. Ledge Crawl Hall has hammered two 2-by-4s together side-by-side, tipped to concrete blocks vertically and positioned the wood through the blocks to craft a beam 14 feet long. Laura Dennis-Guilmette, 28, Jessie’s wife and fellow wrestler, can ramble across the unsteady beam without falling.

If these obstacles weren’t hard enough on their own, Ninja contests combine up to 10 of them into routines called stages. In six seasons, no contestant has claimed the “ultimate victory” title of American Ninja Warrior because nobody has made it into the fourth and final stage: a 75-foot rope climb that must be accomplished within 45 seconds.

This is why Luc Gosselin, associate professor in the University at Buffalo Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, who oversees an Exercise Is Medicine program at the school, recommends those starting obstacle training start slowly, particularly if they’re sedentary, and check with their doctor if they have any healthy concerns.

“We tell our clients when they start here, ‘Start easy and see how you feel at the end of the workout, the next day and the day after,’ ” Gosselin said. “If you feel fine, then you can add some intensity to your workout.”

email: refresh@buffnews.com

Visit source:  

Attacking your workout like a ninja warrior

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, Uncategorized, Weight TrainingComments (0)

AMP: Marc Megna's 8-Week Aesthetics Meets Performance Trainer Phase 4, Day 49

Back | Main | Next

Use today to look back at how far you’ve come. You’ve put on size and strength while shedding fat. You might have hit some setbacks along the way, but you’ve made progress. You’re seeing results, and each successful stride has brought you closer to your goals. Your clothes probably fit better, the scale may show proof of your payoff and, most importantly, your confidence has likely seen a boost.

If you want to really document how far you’ve come, use today to take a new progress picture and update your stats on BodySpace. You may have some new max lifts to record, so share your victories with the community.

You’ve got one more week to build on your greatness. Go after it!


Back | Main | Next

Recommended For You

Working Class Man: Marc Megna Workout

There are a million reasons why Muscletech performance

coach Marc Megna shouldn’t be living his dreams. But

they’re not stopping him.

Fitness 360: Marc Megna, Dream Big, Never Quit

Marc Megna played in the NFL and coached pro athletes after he left the game. Now, he’s an elite trainer and fitness model. Follow his fitness plan!

Marc Megna’s Weekend Warrior Workout

Can’t spend hours in the gym every day? You don’t have to! This twice-per-week, full-body workout will help you weekend warriors do better in sports and live healthier lives.


About The Author

Tons of people are using them everyday with great results.

Read this article – 

AMP: Marc Megna's 8-Week Aesthetics Meets Performance Trainer Phase 4, Day 49

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, UncategorizedComments (0)

AMP: Marc Megna's 8-Week Aesthetics Meets Performance Trainer Phase 4, Day 48

Back | Main | Next

Time flies when you’re having fun—or when you’re pushing your cardio limits. Each of these sprints requires only 30 seconds of max effort and is followed by a full minute of rest, so don’t slouch.

If you feel up to it, add another series to your cardio work today. Yes, it’s a lot of work, but your body and mind are more than ready to take on greater challenges. These greater challenges will lead to increased adaptation and continuing gains.

  • Jogging-Treadmill Jogging-Treadmill Cardio Of Choice
    3 sets – 30 seconds max-effort work and 1 minute rest
    Rest 8 minutes; Repeat 2 more times


Back | Main | Next

Recommended For You

Working Class Man: Marc Megna Workout

There are a million reasons why Muscletech performance

coach Marc Megna shouldn’t be living his dreams. But

they’re not stopping him.

Fitness 360: Marc Megna, Dream Big, Never Quit

Marc Megna played in the NFL and coached pro athletes after he left the game. Now, he’s an elite trainer and fitness model. Follow his fitness plan!

Marc Megna’s Weekend Warrior Workout

Can’t spend hours in the gym every day? You don’t have to! This twice-per-week, full-body workout will help you weekend warriors do better in sports and live healthier lives.


About The Author

Tons of people are using them everyday with great results.

See original:  

AMP: Marc Megna's 8-Week Aesthetics Meets Performance Trainer Phase 4, Day 48

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, UncategorizedComments (0)

AMP: Marc Megna's 8-Week Aesthetics Meets Performance Trainer Phase 4, Day 44

Back | Main | Next

Although you’re working on your bench press by practicing speed and power, a really heavy bench doesn’t necessarily translate to a better-looking chest. That’s why the accessory movements you do are so important, so hit those accessory and isolation lifts with as much effort as you apply to your compound exercises. Remember, everything you do in the gym has a purpose.


Back | Main | Next

Recommended For You

Working Class Man: Marc Megna Workout

There are a million reasons why Muscletech performance

coach Marc Megna shouldn’t be living his dreams. But

they’re not stopping him.

Fitness 360: Marc Megna, Dream Big, Never Quit

Marc Megna played in the NFL and coached pro athletes after he left the game. Now, he’s an elite trainer and fitness model. Follow his fitness plan!

Marc Megna’s Weekend Warrior Workout

Can’t spend hours in the gym every day? You don’t have to! This twice-per-week, full-body workout will help you weekend warriors do better in sports and live healthier lives.


About The Author

Tons of people are using them everyday with great results.

See original article: 

AMP: Marc Megna's 8-Week Aesthetics Meets Performance Trainer Phase 4, Day 44

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, UncategorizedComments (0)

Healthy Recipes: 5 Restaurant Meals Renovated For Fitness

I love eating at restaurants. The food is delicious, and usually much different than my typical at-home fare. However, I’m a fit, calorie-conscious person, and eating at restaurants isn’t something I do very often. I say that with some regret because eating a restaurant meal means I didn’t have to plan, cook, or clean up after myself!

Instead of wallowing in my linen-napkinless life, I decided to bring the restaurant to my kitchen. By reworking the ingredients and restructuring the recipes, I have completely remodeled five of my favorite restaurant meals.

Each of these recipes is gluten-free, contains no added sugar, and comes complete with zero guilt. They’re all 175 calories or fewer and packed with all-natural, nutrient-dense ingredients. Your healthy diet does not mean you’ll be stuck with microscopic portions of bland food.

With these ideas in your fit-recipes stash, you’ll be able to add more yum into your diet!

1 COCONUT SHRIMP WITH SWEET AND SPICY DIPPING SAUCE

This recipe was a serious hit with my taste tester. With under a third of the calories found in your standard restaurant version and none of the gluten, this recipe is perfect for any fit kitchen. Because the recipe is super simple, it’s doable for even the most novice cook. It’s great for an appetizer, party snack, or main dish!

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
  2. Whip egg whites until stiff peaks form.
  3. In a separate bowl, add Stevia to unsweetened coconut flakes and mix well.
  4. One at a time, coat shrimp in cornstarch, then coat in whipped egg whites. The more volume the better.
  5. Coat the shrimp in coconut flakes, and place on parchment paper or a silicone baking sheet.
  6. Bake at 375 degrees for 10-15 minutes, turning over after about 7 minutes. Because there is no flour on the shrimp, they will not turn golden brown like a typical breaded shrimp. When they are done, the coconut will be toasted and the tail will be pink. The egg white, if exposed, will still be white.
  7. While the shrimp are in the oven, mix marmalade with Sriracha. More chili sauce will give it more heat. Add a little water to thin out the dipping sauce. The entire amount of dipping sauce is only 40 calories, so dip to your heart’s content!

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 4 shrimp
Recipe Yields: 6

Amount per serving

Calories 168

Total Fat3.5g

Total Carbs8.7g

Protein22.2g

COCONUT SHRIMP WITH SWEET AND SPICY DIPPING SAUCE PDF (28.5 KB)

2 CRISPY CHICKEN WITH SWEET MUSTARD DIP

If you’re missing the crispy goodness of fried chicken, this recipe will fill the void. A typical serving of fried chicken has about 325 calories. This recipe has only half the calories—with just as much crunch and flavor! I listed the spices I like to use, but you could easily omit some or add your own to personalize the flavor.

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Place cereal in a bag. Use a rolling pin or can to crush into small pieces. Be careful not to turn it into a powder.
  3. Place crushed cereal in a large bowl and add onion, salt, and pepper. Mix well.
  4. In a separate bowl, mix the egg whites and water, and stir well.
  5. Pat the chicken dry with a paper towel.
  6. Dip a piece of chicken into the egg whites and allow the excess to run off.
  7. Dip chicken in the cereal mixture. Press down to help it stick. Coat thoroughly.
  8. Place chicken on a baking sheet and lightly spray each piece with olive oil spray.
  9. Bake at 350 degrees for 8-10 min. Flip the chicken and spray lightly. Bake another 8-10 min.
  10. As chicken bakes, mix together Greek yogurt, mustard, and sweetener to make dipping sauce.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 4 oz
Recipe Yields: About 5

Amount per serving

Calories 169

Total Fat3.7g

Total Carbs7g

Protein24g

CRISPY CHICKEN WITH SWEET MUSTARD DIP PDF (28.9 KB)

3 SPICY TURKEY STIR-FRY

I made this variation to replace the Mongolian BBQ I missed so much after giving up gluten. Sadly, soy sauce and noodles have gluten. I promise this is filling and yummy, even without the noodles!

  1. Add turkey, onion, garlic, and pepper to a large wok or pan and cook over medium heat until turkey is lightly browned.
  2. Add eggplant and Szechuan sauce. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until eggplant is browned.
  3. Add bamboo, water chestnuts, sprouts, cilantro, and liquid aminos or soy sauce.
  4. Cover and let simmer for about 8 more minutes.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 1/5 recipe
Recipe Yields: 5

Amount per serving

Calories 175

Total Fat1.4g

Total Carbs16g

Protein24.2g

SPICY TURKEY STIR-FRY PDF (27.4 KB)

4 PULLED CHICKEN

This recipe has a Tex-Mex-inspired flavor. Once the chicken is prepared, you can use it in tacos, serve it over rice, or even try it in burritos. This is by far one of the easiest things in the world to cook; you can use your rice cooker or crock pot to make it. It only has a handful of ingredients and is a healthy and delicious way to eat chicken.

This recipe can feed an army; it will make 12 4-ounce servings. I usually prepare a week’s worth at once. If you want to make less, divide all the ingredients accordingly.

  1. Put all ingredients in the slow cooker, and mix by folding them over a few times.
  2. Set the cooker for 4 hours or more. From my experience, you can’t really overcook this recipe. I’ve set it for 6 hours and it turned out the same. I’ve even put in frozen chicken and cooked for 7 hours. It still turned out great.
  3. When it’s finished, stir the contents. The chicken should fall apart without much effort on your part. This is a sign it is done.
  4. Serve how you like! My personal favorite is on black rice with a little avocado and lime juice.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 1/12 of recipe
Recipe Yields: 12

Amount per serving

Calories 120

Total Fat1g

Total Carbs3g

Protein22g

PULLED CHICKEN PDF (27.2 KB)

5 TURKEY BURGER ON EGGPLANT BUN

This is a great way to satisfy your craving for a delicious, juicy burger without having to worry about the extra carbs or calories you’d get with a regular bun. These burgers are moist and full of flavor. I hope you like them!

  1. Put eggplants into large bowl and fill with water. Add salt.
  2. Stir until salt is completely dissolved. Trim ends off eggplant and slice into pieces about 3/4 inch thick.
  3. Soak eggplant in salt water for at least 20 minutes. They will float, so cover with something heavy to keep the slices of eggplant submerged.
  4. Remove from salt water and pat dry. Lightly spray or brush with olive oil and place on an oven tray. I find that a tray with slits works best.
  5. Broil the eggplant 8 inches from heat for 5-7 minutes, or until slightly browned. Flip, lightly oil, and broil for another 5-7 minutes.
  6. While eggplant cooks, combine turkey, egg whites, flaxseed, bell peppers, shallots, and garlic in a bowl. Mix well.
  7. Form 7 patties from the meat and place them on a cookie sheet.
  8. Broil patties about 8 inches from heat until they are slightly brown. Flip over and broil another 5-7 minutes. You can also grill them if you prefer, but I find they hold together better on the cookie sheet.
  9. Place a patty between two slices of eggplant. Add condiments of your choice, but keep in mind they will add calories not calculated in my total. I like to eat these with some nutritional yeast sprinkled on top for a cheesy taste and some kale for texture.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: One burger with bun
Recipe Yields: 7

Amount per serving

Calories 149

Total Fat5.5g

Total Carbs11.2g

Protein15.5g

TURKEY BURGER ON EGGPLANT BUN PDF (29 KB)

Recommended For You

11 From Heaven: The Top Fitness Snacks!

Got the munchies? Here’s our pick for the 11 best healthy snack options so you won’t bust your physique.

5 High-Protein Snacks To Fire Up Your Muscles

Working hard at the gym doesn’t mean you have to deprive yourself of things like muffins, crepes, or even frosting! Make these high-protein recipes work hard for your muscles.

Healthy Summer Picnic Guide!

Trade the dining room table for the picnic blanket and break out this collection of ridiculously delicious muscle-building recipes!


About The Author

Check out these awesome articles by some of the best writers in the industry.

See the article here: 

Healthy Recipes: 5 Restaurant Meals Renovated For Fitness

Posted in Bodybuilding, Diets, Exercises, Nutrition, UncategorizedComments (0)

AMP: Marc Megna's 8-Week Aesthetics Meets Performance Trainer Phase 3, Day 41

Back | Main | Next

Phase Three’s coming to a close. Finish it strong. Push hard and max out on every 30-second sprint. Your heart might be beating rapidly, you might feel out of breath, but you can keep going.

Think about how you felt when you first started week one, and how much stronger you are now. Think about how your lifts have gone up, how you’ve gained confidence in performing cardio, and how the confidence you’ve gained in the gym has translated into other parts of your life. What’s a better motivator than positive change?

  • Jogging-Treadmill Jogging-Treadmill Cardio Of Choice
    3 sets – 30 seconds max-effort work and 1 minute rest

Rest 8 minutes between sets.


Back | Main | Next

Recommended For You

Working Class Man: Marc Megna Workout

There are a million reasons why Muscletech performance

coach Marc Megna shouldn’t be living his dreams. But

they’re not stopping him.

Fitness 360: Marc Megna, Dream Big, Never Quit

Marc Megna played in the NFL and coached pro athletes after he left the game. Now, he’s an elite trainer and fitness model. Follow his fitness plan!

Marc Megna’s Weekend Warrior Workout

Can’t spend hours in the gym every day? You don’t have to! This twice-per-week, full-body workout will help you weekend warriors do better in sports and live healthier lives.


About The Author

Tons of people are using them everyday with great results.

Visit site: 

AMP: Marc Megna's 8-Week Aesthetics Meets Performance Trainer Phase 3, Day 41

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, UncategorizedComments (0)

AMP: Marc Megna's 8-Week Aesthetics Meets Performance Trainer Phase 3, Day 40

Back | Main | Next

Looking to press heavy weights today? The answer had better be yes! See if you can press a few more pounds than you did last week. If you can, that means you’re making progress. Be sure to take ample rest before working up to a new PR, though. You want to be fully recovered before handling a maximal load.

Day 40: Upper-Body, Max-Effort Training


Back | Main | Next

Recommended For You

Working Class Man: Marc Megna Workout

There are a million reasons why Muscletech performance

coach Marc Megna shouldn’t be living his dreams. But

they’re not stopping him.

Fitness 360: Marc Megna, Dream Big, Never Quit

Marc Megna played in the NFL and coached pro athletes after he left the game. Now, he’s an elite trainer and fitness model. Follow his fitness plan!

Marc Megna’s Weekend Warrior Workout

Can’t spend hours in the gym every day? You don’t have to! This twice-per-week, full-body workout will help you weekend warriors do better in sports and live healthier lives.


About The Author

Tons of people are using them everyday with great results.

Originally posted here: 

AMP: Marc Megna's 8-Week Aesthetics Meets Performance Trainer Phase 3, Day 40

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, UncategorizedComments (0)

The Ultimate List Of 40 High-Protein Foods!

Let us count the reasons we’re obsessed with protein. For one, you need enough of this benevolent macronutrient to build and repair muscle. It also plays a role in revving fat-burning metabolism and reducing the hunger pangs that can lead to an attack on the vending machine. Additionally, protein works to slow the release of carbohydrates into your bloodstream, which can prevent the sudden spikes in blood sugar that are thought to encourage fat storage and sagging energy levels.

Physique-minded individuals should seek out at least 1 g of protein for each pound of body weight to maintain and build muscle. To reach this lofty amount, however, you’ll need to make sure your grocery cart is filled with a variety of high-protein fare. Unfortunately, today’s supermarkets are flooded with processed foods that can quickly threaten your fitness gains.

That’s why we thought it was about time to roll our editorial cart through the major supermarket sections to help you find the biggest protein wallop for your buck. That way you can load your trunk with the necessary building blocks for a body more chiselled than a Roman sculpture.

Check out our top 40 items to put on your protein-friendly grocery list!

High-Protein Dairy

1 Greek Yogurt

Protein Power: 23 g per 8 oz. serving

Made by straining away the liquid, deliciously thick Greek-style yogurts contain about twice as much protein as regular versions. You’ll also reap the rewards of gut-friendly probiotic bacteria and bone-building calcium.

Need to Know: Plain Greek yogurt can contain up to three times less sugar than flavored types.

2 Cottage Cheese

Protein Power: 14 g per 1/2 cup serving

This curd-riddled cheese product is laced with casein protein—a slow-digesting protein that supplies your growing muscles with a steady supply of vital amino acids. Think of it as the MVP of snack time, especially before bedtime.

Need to Know: Cottage cheese is notoriously high in sodium, but you can now compare nutrition labels to find brands that contain less.


3 Swiss Cheese

Protein Power: 8 g per 1 oz. serving

Ounce for ounce, Swiss cheese provides more protein than other commonly available varieties in the supermarket, making it a muscle-friendly option for your sandwiches and burgers.

Need to Know: If you’re concerned about the calorie density of full-fat Swiss, low-fat versions have a protein-to-fat ratio of around 8-to-1, while still providing good flavor.

4 Eggs

Protein Power: 6 g per 1 large egg

These tasty orbs are near-perfect muscle food.

These white orbs are near-perfect muscle food. That’s because the biological value—a measure of how much protein from the food can be incorporated into proteins in the body—of an egg is higher than that of nearly any other item in the grocery store. The biological value is largely dictated by the amount of essential amino acids a food possesses, and the humble egg has these in spades.

Need to Know: Keep an eye out for cartons containing eggs with beefed-up omega-3 levels to make your morning scramble work even harder for you.

5 Milk, 2%

Protein Power: 8 g per 1 cup serving

Moo juice remains a reliable source of top-notch protein with a biological value just shy of that found in an egg. But why try to chug watery, flavorless skim milk when you can still enjoy the richer taste of 2 percent without breaking the fat bank. Besides, the extra fat will help you absorb the fat-soluble nutrients like vitamin D present in the great white.

Need to Know: Studies show that cows raised using organic farming methods produce milk richer in a range of nutrients, including body-friendly omega fats.


6 Soy Milk

Protein Power: 8 g per 1 cup serving

While most non-dairy milks are light in protein, soy milk is the exception. If you’re eschewing cow dairy for reasons such as lactose intolerance, consider using soy milk to float your cereal in, or for whipping up post-gym shakes.

Need to Know: To keep your intake of gut-busting added sugars to a dull roar, opt for brands labelled “unsweetened.” And if your goal is to avoid genetically modified foods, splurge for organic.

High-Protein Meat

7 Steak (top or bottom round)

Protein Power: 23 g per 3 oz. serving

These leaner cuts of steak provide a fantastic 1 g of protein for every 7 calories; rib eye, on the other hand, delivers roughly 1 g of protein for every 11 calories. Plus, round steak is considered one of the more economical cuts.

Need to Know: Leaner cuts of steak like round and loin will become drier than the Sahara with overcooking, so prepare them quickly over high heat to just medium-rare.


8 Ground Beef (90% lean)

Protein Power: 18 g per 3 oz. serving

Using 90 percent ground beef provides just the right amount of fat so your burgers and meatloaf won’t taste like cardboard. Beyond a payload of protein, this red meat is also a good source of the almighty creatine.

Need to Know: If you’ve got some extra cash in your wallet, opt for grass-fed beef, which is more nutrient-dense than its factory-farm counterparts.

9 Pork Chops (boneless)

Protein Power: 26 g per 3 oz. serving

The bounty of muscle-sculpting protein in easy-to-prepare pork chops gives you more than enough of an excuse to pig out on them.

Need to Know: By helping to break down muscle tissue, soaking your chops in brine can bring more tender meat to the dinner table. Simply cover the pork chops in a brine made with 1/4 cup salt for each 4 cups of water (use enough liquid so that the meat is completely submerged). Cover and chill for 30 minutes to 2 hours.

10 Chicken Breast (boneless and skinless)

Protein Power: 24 g per 3 oz. serving

This bodybuilding staple delivers more protein than other poultry cuts, which is why it should remain a constant presence in your shopping cart.

Need to Know: To keep more greenbacks in your wallet, get chummy with the meat guy at your supermarket, who can give you a heads-up when the poultry is likely to be marked down for quick sale.

11 Turkey Breast

Protein Power: 24 g per 3 oz. serving

As with chicken, this big bird can flood your muscles with a wallop of protein.

Need to Know: Like pork chops and chicken breast, turkey breast can benefit from a pre-cook brining. If you’re concerned about antibiotic use in large-scale poultry farming, you can look for turkey breast labelled “antibiotic-free.”

High-Protein Seafood

12 Yellowfin Tuna

Protein Power: 25 g per 3 oz. serving

This meaty swimmer delivers a boatload of easily digested, premium-quality protein. You’ll also benefit from the healthy amount of B vitamins and the potent antioxidant selenium in its flesh.

Need to Know: When possible, look for troll- or pole-caught tuna, which are the most sustainable options.

13 Halibut

Protein Power: 23 g per 3 oz. serving

Among white flesh species, halibut reigns supreme when it comes to the protein you need to build muscle like a champ. Each 3-oz. serving also has a mere 2 g of fat, making halibut an even better catch of the day.

Need to Know: Pacific halibut is generally considered a more sustainable choice than Atlantic.


14 Octopus

Protein Power: 25 g per 3 oz. serving

An increasing number of fishmongers are now offering up this seafood choice. So if you’re goal is to pack on granite-dense muscle you’d be a sucker—pun intended—not to reel it in for its protein windfall.

Need to Know: Frozen octopus actually has an advantage over fresh because the subzero process works to help tenderize the meat.

15 Sockeye Salmon

Protein Power: 23 g per 3 oz. serving

Not only does wild salmon like sockeye taste better than its farmed cousin, it also supplies about 25 percent more protein. In addition, you’ll reap the benefits of its plethora of fat-fighting long-chain omega-3 fatty acids.

Need to Know: Look for salmon with the skin still intact, as it provides added flavor during cooking.


16 Tilapia

Protein Power: 21 g per 3 oz. serving

Commonly available at most fish markets, tilapia provides an approachable, mild-tasting fish choice that will give you laudable amounts of protein to keep your muscles well-fed.

Need to Know: Look for American-farmed tilapia, which is a safer choice than tilapia imported from Asia.

High-Protein Canned Foods

17 Anchovies

Protein Power: 24 g per 3 oz. serving

Ounce for ounce, these tiny swimmers are the surprising winners when it comes to canned protein . Because of their size, they also don’t accumulate toxins the same way that bigger species do.

Need to Know: To reduce their saltiness, soak anchovies in water for 30 minutes; then drain and pat dry.

18 Corned Beef

Protein Power: 24 g per 3 oz. serving

The lofty protein levels in this salt-cured beef is sure to, well, beef up your muscles. And no, it’s not the same thing as Spam!

Need to Know: Try sauteing corned beef with chopped vegetables and serve over rice, or use it as a main protein in sandwiches.

19 Light Tuna

Protein Power: 22 g per 3 oz. serving

Frugal shoppers rejoice: Less pricey canned light tuna actually provides a little more protein than more expensive canned white tuna.

Need to Know: To save yourself some calories sourced from lackluster oils, opt for water-packed tuna instead of the oil-packed gift of the sea.


20 Chicken

Protein Power: 21 g per 3 oz. serving

Pop the lid on ground-up white chicken meat to instantly add a shot of high-quality protein to your sandwiches and salads.

Need to Know: Compare brands, looking for those that deliver lower amounts of sodium.

21 Sardines

Protein Power: 21 g per 3 oz. serving

Not only are oft-overlooked canned sardines plush in protein, they also deliver plenty of omega-3 fats and vitamin D. Research suggests that higher intakes of vitamin D can bolster testosterone production.

Need to Know: Look for the better-tasting and crazy-sustainable canned sardines from Wild Planet.

22 Navy Beans

Protein Power: 20 g per 1 cup serving

Beans are a fantastically cheap source of protein, and of the most commonly available canned legumes, navy beans lead the way. Each cup also supplies an impressive 13 g of dietary fiber.

Need to Know: A few brands such as Wild Planet pack their beans in cans that are not lined with BPA.

23 Dried Lentils

Protein Power: 13 g per 1/4 cup serving

Often located alongside the canned proteins, bags of inexpensive dry lentils are a sure-fire way to ramp up your intake of protein, fiber, and a range of vital minerals.

Need to Know: Unlike dried beans, lentils don’t require an annoying presoak. Simply simmer them in a pot of water until tender, about 20 minutes. For a nutritious lunch, toss cooked lentils with chopped turkey or chicken breast, diced vegetables, and a lemon vinaigrette.


High-Protein Deli

24 Roast Beef

Protein Power: 18 g per 3 oz. serving

Beef-based deli lunch meats often contain more protein than other lunch options. Most people are surprised to learn that roast beef is also one of the leaner choices as well.

Need to Know: Look for brands like Applegate that eschew nitrites or nitrates, high intakes of which have been linked to certain diseases like cancer.

25 Canadian Bacon

Protein Power: 15 g per 3 oz. serving

Hailing from the leaner back of the pig, Canadian-style bacon has about six times less fat than traditional bacon, giving it a much better protein-to-fat ratio.

Need to Know: You may also encounter Canadian bacon by its other name: peameal bacon

26 Chorizo

Protein Power: 21 g per 3 oz. serving

This Spanish-style seasoned pork sausage can turn pasta dishes, scrambled eggs, soups, and salads into a protein-packed meal.

Need to Know: Harried cooks take notice: Spanish chorizo is cured, so it doesn’t need to be cooked before eating. Mexican chorizo, however, does require a trip to the skillet first.

27 Pepperoni

Protein Power: 18 g per 3 oz. serving

The stellar amount of protein in pepperoni should give you plenty of motivation for a homemade pizza night.

Need to Know: Sodium levels in pepperoni can vary widely, so compare brands and look for options with the lowest amount.

28 Roasted Turkey Breast

Protein Power: 18 g per 3 oz. serving

Being nearly fat-free, slices of deli turkey are almost pure muscle-making protein. So when it comes to lunch sandwiches, pile it high.

Need to Know: Steer clear of flavored turkey and other deli meats to avoid bringing home stuff you don’t need more of, like salt, sugar, and lab-made flavorings.

High-Protein Snacks

29 Jerky

Protein Power: 13 g per 1 oz. serving

We’re not jerking you around when we say jerky is a snack food that means serious muscle-building business. And what’s not to love about its chewiness factor.

Need to Know: You can now find brands such as Krave that are free of MSG and nitrites.


30 Peanut Butter

Protein Power: 8 g per 2 tbsp serving

Though not as trendy as other nut butters like almond, ye olde peanut butter still leads the way in the protein department.

Need to Know: Forget the reduced-fat versions. All they do is replace the healthy fat with not-so-healthy sugar.

31 Mixed Nuts

Protein Power: 6 g per 2 oz. serving

Nuts like peanuts, cashews, and almonds make for a crunchy way to add more protein and healthy unsaturated fats to your diet.

Need to Know: If you’re watching your sodium intake, look for packages labelled “unsalted”.

32 Bean Chips

Protein Power: 4 g per 1 oz. serving

If you’re jonesin’ for crunchy chips, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a better option than the ones made with protein-rich black beans.

Need to Know: For a high-protein nibble while watching the big game, try making a dip with Greek yogurt and using bean chips as a delivery vessel to your mouth.

High-Protein Produce

33 Smoothie Drinks

Protein Power: 16 g per 1 cup serving

Homemade protein shakes are always preferred, but if you want a quick shot of protein in liquid form you can pick up bottles of premade smoothie drinks such as Bolthouse Farms.

Need to Know: Make sure the drink you choose contains a source of protein in the ingredient list such as whey protein and not just fruit, which can quickly send you into a sugary overload.


34 Tofu

Protein Power: 12 g per 3 oz. serving

If you’re looking to embrace Meatless Mondays, slabs of tofu can make sure your protein intake doesn’t suffer too much.

Need to Know: Slices of firm tofu work well in stir-fry, or try slapping them onto the grill to infuse them with some smoky flavor.

High-Protein Frozen Foods

35 Edamame

Protein Power: 8 g per 1/2 cup serving

While the frozen-food section of most supermarkets is a nutritional minefield, packages of these green soybeans will give your diet a boost of plant protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals.

Need to Know: To upgrade your snack time, prepare shelled frozen edamame according to package directions, then season with fresh lemon juice, smoked paprika, and a whisper of salt.

36 Green Peas

Protein Power: 7 g per 1 cup serving

While protein is not abundant in most vegetables, subzero green peas contain enough that you’ll want to keep a bag stashed in your freezer at all times. They’re also a good source of fiber to help keep cravings for junk food at bay.

Need to Know: When buying frozen green peas make sure to fondle the bag. You should be able to feel the individual peas. A giant pea ice cube means they have been thawed previously and then refrozen, which can degrade quality.

37 Frozen Greek Yogurt

Protein Power: 6 g per 1/2 cup serving

Frosty and creamy like ice cream, but with the benefit of containing about twice as much high-quality protein.

Need to Know: Compare brands and look for those with the lowest sugar levels. Some brands actually list fruit before sugar in the ingredient list. Go figure!

High-Protein Grains

38 Wheat Germ

Protein Power: 6 g per 1 oz. serving

The wheat grain is made up of three components—endosperm, bran, and germ. The germ is the most nutrient-dense part and includes notable amounts of plant-based protein. You can use it to add a protein boost to your oatmeal, pancakes, and even shakes.

Need to Know: To preserve freshness, it’s best to store wheat germ in the refrigerator or freezer.

39 Soba Noodles

Protein Power: 12 g per 3 oz. serving

Consider using these buckwheat Japanese-style noodles for your pasta nights since they contain more protein than most wheat-based noodles. Even better, they cook in about half the time as whole-wheat pasta.

Need to Know: To remove the excess starch that can make the noodles gummy, it’s important to rinse cooked soba after draining.

40 Quinoa

Protein Power: 8 g per 1 cup serving

Among whole grains, South American quinoa is a rarity in that it contains a full arsenal of essential amino acids, meaning that it’s a complete protein with muscle-making potential.

Need to Know: Toasting quinoa in a dry skillet or saucepan before simmering it in water can enhance its natural nutty flavor.


Recommended For You

The Benefits Of Post-Workout Carbohydrates

For many people, post-workout recovery includes a dose of fast-acting carbohydrates. But do you really need carbs as part of your post-workout meal for optimal gains?

20 Best Healthy Protein Pancake Recipes

It’s time to take back breakfast with our 20 best healthy protein pancake recipes! Support your fitness goals and your taste buds with this epic protein pancake collection.

11 From Heaven: The Top Fitness Snacks!

Got the munchies? Here’s our pick for the 11 best healthy snack options so you won’t bust your physique.


Read the article: 

The Ultimate List Of 40 High-Protein Foods!

Posted in Bodybuilding, Diets, Exercises, Nutrition, UncategorizedComments (0)

Look Like A Badass After Age 40

On the morning of my 40th birthday, I saw a TV commercial targeted at men my age. Of course, it didn’t look like a commercial at first; it could have passed for a government-issued public service announcement. The commercial warned about the perils of “low T,” aka low testosterone, as if hitting the big four-oh was doomsday for your manhood.

I could have been frightened or offended, but I realized that the purpose of the commercial was simply to sell me a product. With ads like these becoming more common and better-produced all the time, it’s no wonder so many Americans over 40 assume they have no choice but to deteriorate with age.

But you do have a choice—and more than that, you have an opportunity. Ask anyone who has successfully achieved the best shape of their life after the age of 40, and they’ll tell you it’s more satisfying than it ever was at age 30.

Yet it’s also trickier to achieve.

I said tricky—not impossible. You can do this, but you’ll have to take it more seriously than you did as a 17-year-old metabolic furnace that could run on the No. 4 at Taco Bell as easily as it could on clean food. Start by following these principles and working hard, and soon enough you’ll be able to out-lift and out-run your younger self.

DANNY’S DO’S FOR OVER-40 FITNESS

1 Do keep your workouts simple

Many folks from my generation were taught to train according to a strict split routine, oftentimes isolating one or two body parts a day. While that is a great way of training, it’s not the only way. And once you hit 40, it’s also harder than ever to maintain. Get behind on your super-precise program, and it can be hard to catch up—a surefire recipe for skipped workouts and disappointment. That’s just one reason among many why I’m increasingly fond of full-body training and movements.

To start, focus on building proficiency in the basics like squats, push-ups and pull-ups. There’s no reason to overcomplicate things. Trends come and go, but these exercises are the foundation of most strength training. Soon enough, you can certainly add other exercises like lunges, rows, and dips. Throw in some ab flexion and back extension, and that’s all you really need.

For the past several years, I’ve done nothing but bodyweight variations of these classics to get in by far the best shape of my life at 40. Trust me; it can be done!


2 Do work hard

If an exercise doesn’t feel strenuous, it isn’t. In life and fitness, lasting results almost never come without hard work. Sweat, muscular soreness, and an accelerated heart rate are all necessary parts of the game. It’s not supposed to be effortless!

By the same token, be wary of fitness systems that boast of easy success. No matter what anyone says, fitness after 40—or any age, really, but especially after 40—must be earned. That’s part of what makes it so spectacular when you achieve it.

3 Do be consistent

People in our age group tend to overthink when it comes to training. They dwell on questions such as “Should I train Monday and Thursday? Run Tuesday? Take a class on Sunday?” they ponder, often talking themselves out of training at all. The simplest—and in my opinion, best—answer is this: Train more days than you don’t. If you didn’t work out yesterday, do it today.

Consistency and frequency are more important than duration when it comes to wellness. I work out 3-5 days a week, sometimes for 20 minutes, never more than 90. I try to move around every day. That’s it.

4 Do put good things in your body

Another funny thing about age 40: It’s right about the time when many of us find ourselves telling our kids the same things our parents told us. Case in point: “Fruits and vegetables are good for you. They make you lean and strong, have vital nutrients, and are delicious if you’re willing to give them a chance.”

Want to know how to really get your kids to eat right? Lead by example and keep your foods closer to the source. Eat out of fewer packages. Cook more meals. Drink more water. Have less sugar.

By employing invasive medical procedures, gastric surgeries, and lots of expensive drugs, modern medicine can keep your bloated, flaccid body above ground for longer than in the past. If that sounds like less of a triumph than it should be, you’re right. Don’t be one of those people who would rather take cholesterol meds than eat a salad every day. By putting good, pure things in our bodies, we can prevent disease rather than have to treat it.

By no means am I saying that everyone over 40 must adhere to strict dietary procedures every moment for the rest of their lives. Nope—just most of the time. Aim for 80-90 percent, and you’ll be way, way ahead of the curve.

5 Do treat yourself right

You work hard; don’t forget to reward yourself too. Having said that, midlife is a great time to learn that a reward doesn’t have to be in the form of an ice cream sundae. It can be a fun excursion, a new experience, or even just a little downtime—a rare commodity once you hit 40!

The writer Tom Wolfe uses the phrase “workhorse and intercourse” in his novel “The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test” to describe an experiential approach to reward. As someone with a “work hard, feel good” approach to life, that phrase has always resonated with me. Sure, we’ve gotta pay our dues, but it’s important to love life too.

DANNY’S DON’TS FOR OVER-40 FITNESS

1 Don’t make excuses

Often times we dupe ourselves into thinking we don’t have the time to make healthy choices, but that’s not true. We all have time, and each one of us chooses what to do with it.

At this stage in life, it’s likely that you have more responsibilities than you did at, say, 27. Jobs and families consume more time than they ever have before. This is not a bad thing. If anything, this adds value to the time you do have. In my experience working as a trainer in New York City, possibly the most hectic city in the world, the busiest people are the ones who train. They find the time.

2 Don’t expect change to
happen overnight

If it took you 20 years to put on that superfluous body weight, don’t expect it to come off right away. Transformations don’t happen instantly, despite how close together those “before” and “after” pictures are to one another on the page. When you’re no longer a young machine with an endless ability to burn calories, living fitness as a lifestyle becomes all the more important.

Make consistency and daily effort toward the task at hand your mantra. Over time, with attention and hard work, results will come.

3 Don’t worry about anyone but you

You put on the TV and see weight-loss competitions, commercials making totally unrealistic claims, and celebrity diet pageants. You show up at work, and there’s a transformation contest that’s got everyone making lifestyle changes that may or may not be sustainable.

The truth is, in real fitness, the only competition is you. When you’re committing to hard work and discipline over the long term, you need to be able to look at yourself in the mirror and know why you’re doing this. You probably do a lot of things for other people—as you should—but when it comes to staying strong, lean, and powerful, do it for yourself and your loved ones, period.


4 Don’t waste time

A lot of well-meaning folks waste time in the gym. This isn’t totally their fault. In fact, many modern fitness facilities seem deliberately designed to waste time. Don’t believe me? Just look around at all the TV screens, products for sale, smoothie bars, and other similar distractions. It’s as if the focus has shifted from working out effectively to taking as much time as possible!

There are ways you can maximize efficiency. Get to know the gym. Circuit training, supersetting and self-stabilizing bodyweight and free-weight movements—as opposed to using benches or machines—are surefire ways to get the most bang for your proverbial buck. Get more done in less time, and you’ll be able to come back more often.


5 Don’t believe everything you read

These days, anyone can come across as an authority if they know how to design a nice website and rack up a lot of views. A website’s attractiveness doesn’t necessarily validate its content, nor does the forcefulness with which some forum poster or author phrases their point of view.

No, when it comes to fitness, the only thing that makes something true is if it works for you. To succeed, you will have to experiment for yourself, taking care to employ your own reason and common sense. Don’t believe everything you read—not even everything by me—unless it makes sense and works for you.

Good luck, and keep me posted!



Recommended For You

Body Transformation: Laura Carson Hits The Stage At 46

After battling anorexia and endless cardio, Laura found happiness in lifting weights and competition. Here’s her story!

Body Transformation: David Melnick Sticks With Fitness!

David searched for ways to escape the fat that encapsulated his body and found fitness. See how he lost 76 pounds and cycled his way into a new body at age 51!

Trading Booze For A Barbell: How Ben Booker Set Down His Glass And Lifted Weights Instead

Ben Booker isn’t your typical fitness model. He’s a blue-collar tech who suffered from alcoholism. Learn how bodybuilding saved his physique, his marriage and his life.


Source article:  

Look Like A Badass After Age 40

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, Uncategorized, Weight lossComments (0)

AMP: Marc Megna's 8-Week Aesthetics Meets Performance Trainer Phase 3, Day 38

Back | Main | Next

Head into today’s cardio session with a positive mindset. It’s true that these two weeks have a strength focus, but without additional cardio the likelihood of becoming both strong and lean is slim. Plus, endurance is important for athletic performance. Without a good aerobic base, how are you going to make it through that game of touch football or run bases without getting winded?

Whether you consider cardio a bane or blessing, know one thing for sure: It’s necessary. Get after it with everything you’ve got!

  • Jogging-Treadmill Jogging-Treadmill Cardio Of Choice
    3 sets of 7 minutes at sustainable max effort

Rest 5 minutes between sets.


Back | Main | Next

Recommended For You

Working Class Man: Marc Megna Workout

There are a million reasons why Muscletech performance

coach Marc Megna shouldn’t be living his dreams. But

they’re not stopping him.

Fitness 360: Marc Megna, Dream Big, Never Quit

Marc Megna played in the NFL and coached pro athletes after he left the game. Now, he’s an elite trainer and fitness model. Follow his fitness plan!

Marc Megna’s Weekend Warrior Workout

Can’t spend hours in the gym every day? You don’t have to! This twice-per-week, full-body workout will help you weekend warriors do better in sports and live healthier lives.


About The Author

Tons of people are using them everyday with great results.

Excerpt from:  

AMP: Marc Megna's 8-Week Aesthetics Meets Performance Trainer Phase 3, Day 38

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, UncategorizedComments (0)

BlogUpp!

Archives

September 2014
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  
Content Protected Using Blog Protector By: PcDrome.