Tag Archive | "fitness"

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How to tone up your back

Say goodbye to annoying back fat...

Guilty of neglecting your back muscles? You’re not the only one. We often focus mainly on the muscles we see in the mirror and end up completely forgetting about the ones at the back. While our abs may be on point just in time for our summer beach holiday, our back could do with a little work in the gym. However, we’ve got you sorted with the best exercises for toning your back and feeling fantastic, from back to front.

Not only will working on your back boost your overall physique, but it’ll also dramatically improve strength and posture. A clever combination of the right diet plus the back exercises that give you the most bang for your buck will get you on the right path to eliminating excess fat and back pain. These two effective exercises are bound to make you feel strong, powerful and ready to step up your gym game.

Bent-over row

1. Stand with feet hip-width apart, knees bent and upper body leaning forwards from the hips. Keep a flat back.

2. Holding a barbell with both hands, arms extended towards the floor, row the barbell up to your waist.

3. Lower slowly and repeat.

Safety tip: keep your shoulders back and try not to hunch.

Eccentric chin-up

1. Stand underneath a pull-up bar, on a step if necessary.

2. Jump up to take hold of the pull-up bar with both hands, palms facing you. Your chin should already be at the height of the bar, at the top of the movement.

3. Lower yourself as slowly as you can, until arms are fully extended.

4. Release and repeat.

Kick refined carbs to the curb

Keeping fit and looking after your body isn’t just about doing the right exercises; you also need to make sure you’re eating the right food to. Exercising and maintaining a healthy diet go hand-in-hand.

Make sure that sugar and refined carbohydrates (like pasta and bread) are sparse in your diet as the consumption of high-GI foods like these will encourage your body to store fat. Fill up on fibrous veg and high-protein sources like eggs and chicken, instead.

Source: How to tone up your back

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8 Minutes to a Gorgeous Upper Body

The key to rocking shoulder-baring sweaters and blouses this season is pairing them with a strong, toned upper body.

Contrary to popular belief, you don’t need to speed hours in the gym to achieve an eye-catching upper body.

What you need is a challenging workout—one that cranks up the intensity on your muscles and eliminates every last ounce of flab. Enter Tabata training, also known as the four-minute fat-burning workout.

There’s a reason this type of high-intensity interval training is the go-to when you want to shed pounds and tone up fast—it works.

 GETTING STARTED

A Tabata workout (not including warm up and cool down) involves performing 20 seconds of high-intensity exercise followed by 10 seconds of active recovery. You repeat this cycle eight times, for a total of four minutes of very short, intense bursts of exercise.

In this particular workout, you’ll complete two Tabatas, for a total of eight minutes of high-intensity intervals.

Exercise 1

woman lifting weights

Dumbbell Row—As many as you can in 20 seconds.

Stand with your feet slightly narrower than shoulder-width apart and bend forward at the hips, keeping your back parallel to the floor and head up. Grasp a dumbbell in each hand and let your arms hang straight down from your shoulders. Pull the weights up and back toward your hips, concentrating on pulling with your back muscles, until your elbows are slightly above the level of your back. Pause, then lower the weights. Repeat for reps.

Active rest: Jump on a treadmill or walk in place for 10 seconds.

Exercise 2

Overhead shoulder press—As many as you can in 20 seconds.

Stand erect with your feet shoulder-width apart, head straight, and your eyes focused forward. Grasp a pair of dumbbells using an overhand (palms down) grip and raise them to just above shoulder height. This is your starting position. Keeping your shoulders back, press your arms up overhead. Pause for a moment at the top, then return to start. Repeat for reps.

Active rest: Jump on a treadmill or walk in place for 10 seconds.

Repeat sequence for a total of four minutes.

 *Warm up for five minutes on the treadmill beforehand.

ROUND 2

Works: Triceps, chest, core, shoulders*

Exercise 1

Reebok Introduces First-Ever World Burpee Day

Pike walk—As many as you can in 20 seconds.

Stand with your feet together, arms at your side. Bend at the hips and place your hands on the floor in front of you. Walk your hands forward until you are in a plank position. Keeping your hands firmly planted in place, walk your feet up until they’re as close to your hands as possible. Repeat.

Active rest: Jump on a treadmill or walk in place for 10 seconds.

Exercise 2

Dip—As many as you can in 20 seconds.

Place your hands on the edge of a bench with your thumbs facing each other, and extend your legs in front of you, resting your feet on floor in front of you. Bend your elbows and lower your butt, stopping when your upper arms are parallel to the floor. Extend your elbows to come up. Repeat for reps.

Tip: To increase the intensity, use a bench or chair to elevate your feet. You can also place a weight on top your thighs.

Active Rest: Jump on a treadmill or walk in place for 10 seconds.

Repeat sequence for a total of fout minutes.

*Cool down for five minutes on the treadmill afterward.

Although eight minutes may not seem like a lot, you’ll certainly feel the burn. This form of training can be used for virtually any and every exercise. Apply this training protocol to your regular workouts every once in a while to shake things up and break through dreaded plateaus.

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EliseChrisLeW

Health and fitness talk with Elise Carver

On the road so far

I studied to be a master trainer through the Australian Institute of Fitness about nine years ago and worked part time at a gym in South Yarra with some fantastic mentors who showed me the value of quality training. Shortly after, I began to fall in love with surfing. When I decided to make the shift to Torquay, I was already on my way to changing my body shape to suit surfing and so the Surf Style Training method was born and developed organically. I soon realised the mainstream way of training wasn’t for me and I have now run a successful business out of my own studio for three years.

On body type

Your natural body shape is what you make it. I’ve been through so many variations of my ‘natural’ body shape in my lifetime – I just happen to love the one I have now. When I was a gymnast I was a young, skinny springy ball of energy. When I started rock climbing, I began to develop a very strong upper body, which explains my shoulder definition. There was dancing, which helped to develop my strong core and then, as I got older, I got stuck right into gym and stacked on a solid five to six kilos of muscle – this was probably my least favourite body shape. When I got into surfing, I turned my bulk into lean, pliable muscle fit for surfing and have never looked back.

On body love

I really like my core and posture! It’s the one thing that stays strong despite the fact that I have scoliosis. It’s switched on all the time – it’s like doing an ab workout while you breathe.

I’m trying to improve my body all the time! You can always be stronger, fitter, faster, more flexible or agile. I just work on a little bit every week. I also have injuries that I have to manage, such as my torn meniscus in my knee and my lumbar scoliosis.

On genetics 

I have my Dad’s ability to build strong muscles, but my relatively petite frame is courtesy of my mother. That said, my mother is overweight and my dad fluctuates depending on what he is eating or how much he is working. Genetics gives you the blank canvas you have to work with but you decide what the painting looks like.

On training

The best way to train your body and get results is to challenge it with something new as often as possible. I do three to four sessions a week and every workout I do is different. On a good week, I also surf three to five times, jump on a bike or the cross trainer three times, walk my dog on the beach every morning and stretch every day. 

On nutrition

I have chronic gastritis, so my stomach is very touchy, but it’s like a blessing because I now eat to support my digestive system. I avoid dairy, gluten, refined sugars, caffeine, legumes and meat after 3pm. It seems like a tough meal plan at first but it actually opened up a whole new way of being for me. I’m trialling the meal plan with my clients at the moment, and I’m hoping to release the plan and a recipe book soon. 

On body image

Everyone is hard on themselves at one time or another. You need to understand the difference between wanting to be better and beating yourself up. If we didn’t expect more from ourselves then we would all be slobs, so use that motivation to get off your ass! But if you’re beating yourself up, that’s just pointless.

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Health and fitness talk with Elise Carver

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The Truth About Weight Loss

There’s more to weight loss than losing weight

The start of every health kick can be a glorious time, with your motivation at its highest and the fitness gains at their easiest to come by. Your muscles might be aching, and your diet could be missing a few unhealthy favourites, but the weight will be dropping off like nobody’s business.

At some point, however, you might find that whatever efforts you make in the gym or the kitchen do not result in any further losses when you step on the scales. Your weight plateaus, or perhaps even nudges slightly upwards. Obviously, this can be the ultimate motivation killer if your main goal is weight loss, but a simple scales reading can be misleading when it comes to your general health.

More important than how much you weigh is your body composition – namely how much of your body is made up of fat, muscle, bones, water, assorted organs, and so on. Some of these you can’t do much about – it doesn’t matter how much you try, you’re unlikely to shave any weight off your liver without resorting to some extremely risky behaviour. It’s still good to know what’s going on with all your insides, but the key two areas of body composition you can affect are your body fat and muscle mass.

Reducing body fat is often the main goal of people’s plans when they embark on a new exercise regime and/or diet, and any early weight loss is a result of achieving that goal. However, when weight loss plateaus it doesn’t necessarily mean that you’ve stopped lowering your body fat percentage. It could simply mean that you’re increasing your muscle mass at the same time. No net weight loss, but a far healthier body composition.

An extreme example often used to illustrate the deficiencies of simply relying on weight as a guide to health is comparing the Body Mass Index (which is based on height and weight, with no accounting for body composition) of a professional rugby player with an obese person. Both might end up with a matching BMI score, but the muscle-bound rugby hulk is clearly in better shape in terms of their overall health.

Even if you never reach the rippling physique of a Jonah Lomu in his prime, you might also suffer from misapprehensions about your health and the effectiveness of your gym work if you only use overall weight as a guide to your progress.

The issue is that muscle is not heavier than fat, but it is denser. This means it takes up less space to weigh the same amount as fat, so your body shape might be changing for the better even if your total weight is the same after weeks of working out.

Body composition is also important when it comes to the type of fat you have. Visceral fat, which accumulates around your organs in the mid-section, is the most dangerous kind, in that a large quantity of it is linked with an increased risk of all kinds of problems including heart disease, several cancers and type 2 diabetes. A relatively slim physique with a pot belly is therefore nothing to boast about, you need to shift that midsection bulk rather than just focussing on your overall weight.

The good news is that visceral fat is the first stuff you’ll shift when you start exercising. Even if you can’t see the fat itself, you can monitor your progress by measuring your waistline regularly. Keeping tabs on your waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) is good practice all round if you’re on a fitness drive, as it has been found to be a better indicator of obesity-related health risks than simple weight or BMI measurements. To see if your ratio is unhealthily high simply grab a piece of string, use it to measure your height then fold it in half. If it doesn’t fit around your waist, then your ratio is in bad shape, and it’s time to start slimming.

There are also plenty of more precise ways to get a handle on your body composition, from the humble pair of callipers to smart scales. With callipers you pinch the skin and measure the fold in at least three locations on your body. Then plug those numbers into an online calculator to get an idea of your body fat. The number itself might not be incredibly accurate, but consistently measuring in the same way with callipers over time will allow you to track changes in your body composition.

For their part, smart scales such as the Withings Body Cardio will provide the most in-depth and accurate look at your insides you can get outside of a hospital, telling you your body fat, muscle mass, water percentage and bone mass, along with your actual weight. In terms of practical information about how your efforts to improve your fitness are going, it’s a huge step up from standard scales.

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The Truth About Weight Loss

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emilyskyeprofile

How to eat like a female fitness model

For 30-year-old fitness model, Emily Skye, it used to be about getting skinny and slaving away on the cardio machines. It then became all about nourishing her body to becoming strong, working out and becoming healthy.

Her food philosophy

Don’t diet – instead just make clean eating part of your lifestyle. Learn as much as you can about healthy food and find foods that you really enjoy eating so that your diet changes are easier to stick to. Keep it interesting by experimenting.

The ‘before’ diet

I didn’t eat anywhere near as much food as I should have and my choices were either super rigid – with lots of bland, steamed food or I made unhealthy choices such as junk food, takeaway and deep-fried food.

The turning point

For years I struggled with depression and insecurities that stemmed in part from my school years where I was teased and criticised for having “big eyes”, being skinny, quiet, athletic or different. Six years ago I decided I was tired of never feeling good about myself. So I set out to become more happy, healthy and fit through lifestyle changes. Within about 12 weeks of lifting weights and eating super clean (lots of vegetables and more protein), I had lost body fat and built more muscle. Over the next year, I continued to fine-tune my diet and started doing less cardio and more working out with weights. I soon felt amazing and far happier with how I looked.

The health benefits of eating cleaner

Once my diet became cleaner, I not only lost body fat and built more muscle but within days of starting to eat healthier, I had less fluid retention and less general body inflammation. I felt more positive about myself and started to appreciate everything I am rather than focussing on what I am not. My new lifestyle helped me overcome depression and insecurities, my mind became clearer, I became strong and fit and I had more energy.

The diet now

I don’t eat sugar (except for a little natural sugar in fruits and vegetables). I barely eat any starchy carbs but I have more meat and a wider range of fresh vegetables and salads. I avoid gluten and wheat and I’ve cut right down on dairy products (except for natural yogurt and cottage cheese as they’re lower in lactose, which I’m sensitive to). I avoid processed foods, artificial colours, flavours and preservatives. I drink a lot of pure water and I don’t drink alcohol (except for special occasions – I only drink a few times a year).

It’s okay to have what you love

I love the taste of coffee – one of my favourite activities is to enjoy a coffee at a café. I drink one to two cups a day. If you’re constantly depriving yourself of foods you love, you’re more likely to give up a healthy eating plan. Instead I’m all for moderation. That means I have treats when I feel like it and I never make a food ‘off limits’ as doing this can lead to cravings. If I really want something, I enjoy it without regrets. I love healthier treats, though, as they don’t upset my tummy. I often make a chia seed pudding with berries and coconut cream or coconut yoghurt… something to look forward to is fun and helps you stay motivated to eat well.

The mind-food connection

Once you eat more clean, your cravings for unhealthy foods tend to subside. Now that I’ve experienced how good it feels on a healthy diet, I’ve noticed how unwell I feel after eating foods like milk chocolate, ice cream, pizza, burgers and fries. I get extremely bloated, my tummy gets upset and I feel lethargic. Understanding this connection makes it so much easier to realise it’s not worth eating those unhealthy foods.

Find out which diet plan works for you and read more about changing up your eating habits for a better, healthier you.

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holly-barker-7-day-workout-plan

Holly Barker’s 7 day workout program

I am active seven days a week. I am currently lifting five days a week and performing some type of cardio seven days a week.

Monday – Hamstrings

  • Stiff-leg deadlift, German volume set 20 warm-up with bar, 10 sets of 10
  • Lying hamstring curl, 4 sets of 12 to 15
  • Sumo squats w/ Olympic bar, 4 sets of 12 to 15
  • Single-leg deadlift w/dumbbell, 4 sets of 12 to 15 (each leg)

Tuesday – Posterior Upper Body

  • Pre-exhaust wide grip pull-up, 3 sets of 8
  • Seated row, 4 sets of 15
  • Bent-over Olympic bar row x 20 (warm up with bar, weight up to 6 rep max, 4 reps at 6 rep max)
  • One-arm dumbbell row, 4 sets of 10 (each side)

Wednesday – Quads/Glutes

  • Lying glute bridge at Smith machine, German volume set, 10 sets of 10
  • Kick-backs, 4 sets of 10
  • Squats, 3 sets to failure
  • Front squat, 4 sets of 10
  • Plyo box step-ups (hold dumbbell in one hand and step up to the alternate side), 3 sets of 20 (each leg)
  • Seated leg extension, 2 sets of 5 quick, 5 resisted, 5 quick + 2 strip set

Thursday – Anterior Upper Body

  • Dumbbell hammer curl, 4 sets of 10
  • Cable lateral raise, 4 sets of 10
  • Ropes, 4 x 30 seconds
  • Straight bar cable bicep curl, 4 sets of 12
  • Seated press, 4 sets of 8
  • Javelin press, 3 sets to failure

Friday – Total Body Fitness Challenge (free iPhone app)
This finishes the week with a cardio blast. It is a free app and it populates exercises with demonstrations and how-to photos, and times you while you perform each move. The hard level challenges you with 10 exercises, starting with 100 down to 10 with a 10-minute finisher and the easy option challenges you to 50 repetitions of an exercise, moving down to 10 with a five-minute finisher. It ensures that I have a stimulated, intense session without having to think of what I should do or what comes next.

Monday through Sunday – Cardio
Walk the dog, hike, run, bike or whatever I feel like!

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How to exercise smart and prevent injury

When you hit the gym, the field or the track, the last thing you want to take home is an injury. But the more time you spend exercising, the higher the risk. Here are several tips to help manage, treat and prevent injuries so you can keep doing what you love, for longer.

Research has shown that women are especially susceptible to debilitating ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), which helps to stabilise the knee joint. A combination of anatomical, biomechanical and other factors is at play. When comparing a woman’s physiology to a male, women have smaller, weaker muscles supporting the knee, a wider pelvis, and thigh bones which angle inward more sharply from hip to knee. Women also have a greater imbalance between the quadricep and hamstring muscles, which can contribute to knee injuries. And there are biomechanical differences between the way men and women land on their feet, as in running or jumping. Researchers have also suggested that the female hormone oestrogen makes women more vulnerable to ACL injury by weakening this ligament.

The importance of warming up

A proper warm-up will heat and loosen the body. Different forms of sport and exercise require different warm-ups, but as a general rule, a dynamic warm-up will get all the joints moving one at a time, then all together, taking the body through progressive movements that loosen and stretch your muscles. Classic dynamic warm-up moves include walking lunges, toe touches, and high knees.

Your outfit counts

For some sports, protective equipment is important to prevent damage. This is particularly relevant for sports involving physical contact, think football and hockey (shin guards) and boxing (boxing gloves and protective head gear).

It’s also important to wear the correct footwear. The right shoes will support the foot and ankle, helping to prevent twisting and injury. In addition, many athletes wear supports, such as knee, ankle, or elbow supports, to offer additional support and protection to joints which may have been weakened by an earlier injury. Supports help stabilise the joint and prevent further damage.

Keep moving post-workout

More exercise is probably the last thing on your list after a big session, but according to a study recently published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, performing light exercise post-workout may help ease your soreness, and can be just as beneficial as having a massage.

Another useful tip is to use heat to increase blood flow, which will ease your sore muscles. Soak in a hot bath, or if the pain is isolated, apply heat directly to your trouble spot. Many peel-and-stick heating pads stay in place for hours and are thin enough to wear under clothing.

Finally, taking an Omega-3 pill once a day reduces soreness and eases inflammation 48 hours after a strength-training workout, according to research published in the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine. Omega-3s — which are also found naturally in foods such as salmon, spinach, and nuts — may help boost circulation to sore muscles while also reducing inflammation.

Rehab your injury

If your injury is severe (i.e. you can’t put weight on the area, or have swelling, numbness or severe pain) you should see a doctor. If you can treat the injury yourself, the RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation) method is tried and tested and very often effective.

Rest. Reduce your regular activities. If you’ve injured your foot, ankle, or knee, take weight off of it.

Ice. Place an ice pack on the injured area for 20 minutes, four-to-eight times a day. You can use a cold pack or ice bag. Take the ice off after 20 minutes to avoid cold injury.

Compression. Put even pressure (compression) on the injured area to help reduce swelling. You can use an elastic wrap, special boot, air cast, or splint. Ask your doctor which one is best for your injury.

Elevation. Place the injured area on a pillow, at a level above your heart, to help reduce swelling.

 

Be prepared with a first aid kit

The type of first aid that may be required varies for every sport. Because bruises, abrasions, and sprained ankles are more common in some field sports, their first aid kit, for instance, needs to be stocked with cold packs, elastic bandages, and Band-Aids. A track team’s kit, on the other hand, needs to have plenty of supplies to treat blisters, abrasions, pulled muscles, and sprains. Sunscreen and allergy kits may also be appropriate for outdoor sports.

If you are regularly involved in sport, it’s worth having some knowledge of first aid, especially if you are playing sports in areas where there is no immediate access to trained medical people. At Real First Aid, you can sign up for first aid courses, or they can visit your workplace or sports club to work with larger groups. Think of it as an essential investment into your health and wellness, and that of everyone around you.

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cardiohiit

4 HIIT workouts to try now

So you want to be one of those super-fit (and perky) people? Set a goal and time frame and train using these HIIT workouts.

High-intensity interval training (HIIT) involves alternating short periods of intense anaerobic exercise with active recovery sessions. These short, intense workouts burn high levels of calories and improve athletic capacity.

How: Try the following routine over two to four weeks and complete two times per week. Make sure you record whether you reached the program goal or not. 

a.Workout 1: Incline sprints (lvl 35) 
30-second maximal output then drop incline and actively recover for 2 min x 5 sets

b. Workout 2: Incline sprints (lvl 35) 
45-second maximal output then drop incline and actively recover for 2 min x 5 sets

c.Workout 3: incline sprints (lvl 35) 
45-second maximal output, drop incline and actively recover for 1.5 min x 5 sets

d. Workout 4: Incline sprints (lvl 35) 
45-second maximal output, drop the incline and actively recover for 1 min x 5 sets

Insider’s tip: Try this instead of long steady-state cardio sessions and watch your fitness levels soar!

Discover more way to fast-track you fat loss here.

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sinead-main

Sweat. Believe. Roar. workout with Sinead Disaya

Your animalistic side with this high-intensity workout based on functional movement patterns, courtesy of trainer Sinead Disaya. 

Warning: requires a willingness to laugh at yourself as you crawl, sway and hop your way to a lean physique. 

Get it done

Set your timer for three minutes. Exercises are completed back-to-back as a superset, for 30 seconds each. No rest – just do the best you can in the three minutes. Rest for one to two minutes between each superset, depending on your fitness level. 

This workout combines functional movement patterns (moving the body in all directions) with high-intensity interval training (HIIT) designed to shred fat and improve mobility. Functional movement training is suitable no matter what your profession or fitness level – whether you’re an office worker who is sitting down the majority of the day, an athlete or rehabilitating post-injury. The purpose is to move your body in ways you normally wouldn’t help build strength and loosen up your joints. This can help reduce lower back pain, stiffness and poor posture. Focus on the intensity of your workouts – you only get out what you put in!

My Sweat. Believe. Roar. programs contain a balance of functional movement and traditional training methods to build lean muscle and overall strength. For my full guides visit sineaddisaya.com.

Photography: Christopher Cameron Photography

Super Set 1: 3 mins total 

Rainbow Lunges (30 secs x 3)

sinead-rainbowlunges.jpg

Rainbow Lunges focus on building muscle throughout your lower body as well as engaging your core. Start in the lunge position and keep your chest up. Brace your core and pivot your feet. Use your arms to created an arch above your body and finish again in your lunge position facing the opposite direction.

Palm Trees (30 secs x 3)

sinead-palmtrees.jpg

Palm Trees are a fantastic exercise for your obliques and developing the strong ‘V’ line throughout your core. Start with your feet together, holding the weight overhead with both hands, and a soft knee bend. Drive your hips laterally almost making the letter ‘C’. Brace your core each time you change direction. Try to avoid moving your arms, as they will naturally tilt as your drive your hips to the side. 

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Sweat. Believe. Roar. workout with Sinead Disaya

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leg-stretch

How to measure your strength progression

Strength progression is all about how much weight you can lift, over a certain number of reps or sets, here’s how to measure your progression.

What is it?

Tracking strength progression is vital to any resistance based program, with muscles needing to be consistently challenged in order to fortify the neural connections and muscular adaptions needed for change. Lift the same weight, for the same reps and sets, for weeks on end, and you will likely plateau in both the potential health benefits of resistance training and body composition.

“If we are tracking strength increases, then it’s vital we record our workouts and weights in a diary. Knowing that on week one we pressed 20kg overhead and this week we pressed 22.5kg overhead is a big motivator,” says trainer and owner of Fully Loaded Fitness, Ethan Hyde.
Hyde.

“It also sets a benchmark. Once you hit 22.5kg, chances are you won’t get the 20kg again! Testing isn’t just about knowing some numbers – it motivates us to keep pushing forward and set new benchmarks along the way.”

Test 1: One- to 10-rep maximums

Hyde suggests beginners test their 10-rep max (the maximum weight you can lift with good form for 10 reps across a range of key lifts).

“One rep max tests are great on trained individuals. An untrained person lacks the strength and range of movement to load with a maximal weight. The risk of injury creeps up a bit too much,” says Hyde.

“It’s important not to worry about testing strength for every single exercise you do. Focus on the major lifts that are proven to be good measures of strength.”

Hyde suggests:

  • Horizontal push – bench press
  • Horizontal pull – bent over row
  • Vertical push – barbell press
  • Vertical pull – pull-ups or lateral pulldown
  • Knee dominant leg exercise – squats
  • Hip dominant leg exercise – deadlift

McKee uses a similar method, testing upper body strength via the bench press and lower body via the squat. For beginners, start with a barbell bar only on both lifts (five to seven kilograms) and add weight in 2.5kg to 5kg increments every 12 reps. For intermediate to advanced lifters, use an Olympic bar (20kg) and add weight in increments of 5 to 10kg.

“I also have interim key performance indicators where we look at the number of reps being achieved at a new weight level to ensure we keep the lifter motivated and on target to progress to the next level,” says McKee.

The test is complete when you can no longer lift the weight for 12 reps with good form. The weight on which you ‘fail’ should increase at the end of each phase of training.

Words by Katelyn Swallow.

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Paige Hathaway

Paige Hathaway

2 days 22 minutes ago

Limits are imaginary ✨🤟🏼🌎
Never in a million years did I think that I would travel to Dubai, get to meet and share smiles with hundreds of people at the fitness expo or ride camels and four wheelers in the desert!! Geeesh, What is life.. 😍

...At the end of the day, I think to myself that my life may not always be perfect, but it’s completely what I make of it. 👉🏼 It’s not exactly what I see but how I look at things. It’s not necessarily about what I do, but how I do it. So everyday I make my life count and I make it memorable and I do the things my dreams inspire to be.

Paige Hathaway

3 days 1 hour ago

It’s ok to be scared.. being scared is normal but letting that feeling overpower your life and control you will ruin it. Most people are paralyzed by their fears. They become so afraid to take a step out of their comfort zone that they stay complacent. They fear failure, they fear rejection, they fear fear... But having courage against your fears doesn’t mean you don’t get scared... having courage against your fears just means you didn’t let fear stop you. Refuse to reform your life because you’re scared of the unknown or getting outside of your normal.

DECLARE TO HAVE FAITH IN YOURSELF ABOVE EVERYTHING ELSE! Use your energy not to worry but to believe. Great people do things before they are fully prepared. They do things before they know that they can even do it. Doing things you are afraid of, going beyond your comfort zone, taking risks that scare the hell out of you... THAT is what life is. You might be really good. You might find out something about yourself that’s really special and if you’re not good.. who freaking cares....?!
You tired something and the comfort zone that you left will still be the comfort zone that you left if you shall ever choose to return. ✨🐫🌏 #ididntgetthisfarfromfear #igotthisfarfromhavingcourage

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