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Flat tummy exercises for women

Want to rock a flat stomach but sick of your usual abs routine? Hula hooping is a fun way to tone the whole body while focusing on the abdominal and core muscles and cinching in that waist. It’s quick, easy and can be done anywhere from the park to your own home. So take yourself back to the days of the playground, de-stress and tone up that tum.

How to do it

Perform each exercise for the required amount of time for your level, doing as many reps with good form as possible. Repeat the workout two or three times a week to upbeat music for the best results.

Kit you’ll need

Adult hula hoop

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Flat tummy exercises for women

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Strike a balance with this Inner thigh exercise

Want to boost gym performance? It’s time to balance out your intense workouts with a good old dance-inspired stretch

Blocking out the time to really delve into a stretching session can seem hard to justify if your busy schedule already makes squeezing workouts in difficult.

But if you’ve found yourself hitting a wall when it comes to results, or you’re constantly plagued by niggling injuries, it might just be what the doctor ordered. US-based Lastics has taken inspo from the long, lean and limber bodies of dancers to come up with classes and online videos to help regular gym-goers get the most out of their workouts. ‘Dancers epitomise the balance between strength and flexibility to the extreme,’ says Lastics founder Donna Flagg. ‘Their bodies are graceful, sculpted and powerful.’

Rather than overhauling your entire workout routine to emulate that of a ballerina, Lastics instead allows you to simply take a leaf out of their book, providing stretching-focused classes to help you develop an improved range of motion. This is essential to anyone who’s looking to prevent injuries, boost conditioning and balance out strength training – as well as achieve a slender silhouette. ‘Lastics enhances all other activities, improves posture and circulation and gives you more freedom to move in your body,’ Donna adds. So if you’re intrigued by the slenderness and strength of a dancer but don’t necessarily have any goals to make it as one (bar the occasional tear-up on the dance floor on a Friday night), this is the perfect middle ground.

If you’re interested in subscribing to Lastics, trying out the DVD or even just having a taster of what it might be like, give this workout a go. Donna has devised it especially to supplement WF’s workouts, but it’s a wise and healthy addition to any active woman’s weekly routine. It can even be added to the end of a workout if you don’t want to dedicate an entire session to it.

How to do it

Breathe into the stretch and release when the body starts to resist. Then take a few breaths and release deeper into the stretch on each exhale. Repeat as desired.

Technique

Sit in a straddle and let your head hang between your legs, rounding your back. Release any tension you may be holding.

After you’ve been hanging there totally relaxed, reach your nose a little closer to the floor. Hold your upper body where it is and press the backs of your knees down into the floor.

Hold your body and knees in place and flex your feet, making sure your knees don’t pop back up.

Finally, hold all of that and lift your chin to flatten your back. Hold for a few seconds.

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Strike a balance with this Inner thigh exercise

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Dumbbells Only Pump for Upper-Body Muscle

YOUR SETUP

Some people have elaborate training accommodations in their homes (a power rack, full sets of dumbbells, bars and plates, one of those decked-out home gyms, etc.). You’re not one of those people. You have the bare minimum: a bench and one pair of dumbbells sitting in the basement. The guy with the decked-out gym can do pretty much any of the complete programs we publish every month. You, on the other hand, need to get a bit more creative.

Let’s say those dumbbells you have are a pair of 30-pounders. And like most people, you have limited time on your hands, yet you still want to get the most out of your time.

YOUR SOLUTION

The following workout will tax your entire upper body (chest, back, shoulders, biceps and triceps) in less than a half-hour. Because 30s are the only dumbbells you have, the order in which you do the exercises listed is crucial. Reason being, performing bent-over rows and dumbbell bench presses with such light weight won’t suffice for most guys. However, if you do those movements after a series of other exercises, your upper-body muscles will be fatigued to the point that 30s are plenty heavy to get a good pump without having to do 50-100 reps per set.

Notice which exercises you’ll start with: bent-over lateral raises (for rear delts), kickbacks (triceps), lateral raises (middle delts) and so on. Thirty-pound dumbbells will easily be heavy enough on those movements for most guys, since you have less of a mechanical advantage with them—in other words, they’re more difficult, causing you to use a lighter weight. As you get further along in the circuit, the exercises become easier in terms of mechanical advantage, while at the same time getting tougher because you aren’t resting between exercises. Typically, you’d want to train your larger muscle groups before smaller ones, but not when all you have is a pair of 30s.

YOUR WORKOUT

Do one set of each of these moves consecutively without rest (circuit style). After completing the circuit one time through, rest one minute, then repeat. Take each set of each exercise to failure. Go through the circuit as many times as possible in the limited time you have (in 20 minutes, that should be 4-5 sets per exercise).

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Dumbbells Only Pump for Upper-Body Muscle

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High Reps, Low Reps? Which Rep Scheme Is Best?

“Once you’ve been training long enough, your body grows wiser and you realize that you can’t simply force it to do anything anymore.”

Bodybuilders and strength athletes stop making progress for one reason: They stop coercing their body to adapt. Note how I intentionally use the word coerce, not a connotatively weaker action verb like force. The reason is that once you’ve been in the training game long enough, your body grows wiser and you realize that you can’t simply force it to do anything anymore.

When you continue to push and grunt with no concrete strategy other than “hard work,” you get injured or beat-up. Few things devour reasonable progress faster than what we’ll call “middle ground” training. That is, always training with the same set or rep scheme and with the same intensity. If you default to training in the 8, 10, or 12 rep range, I hate to break it to you, but your growth is simply wallowing in no-gain’s land.

Fortunately, there are tools in the training toolbox that will sharpen up your training. Let’s start with a brief overview and then move on to how these can be applied to your own programming to maximize growth and development.

The Neural-Metabolic Continuum

The first order of business is to focus on a key element of training: The neural-metabolic continuum. It’s a fancy term that allows you to understand whether you actually work your muscles or central nervous system (CNS), based on key variables. For the sake of brevity, here’s a visual breakdown of what it looks like.

Before your eyes glaze over, let me explain. If you’re chasing more metabolic (i.e. hypertrophic) gains, your, say, squatting program might look something like this:

4 sets of 10 repetitions
Tempo: 3 seconds down, no pause in the bottom, 1 second up
60-90 seconds rest between sets

On the other end of the spectrum, where you might be chasing more neural (i.e. strength) gains, your program might more resemble this:

5 sets of 3 repetitions
Tempo: As fast as possible
3-5 minutes rest between sets

Are we clear on the layout of the neural-metabolic continuum? Good, now let’s look at why you need to spend time in both ends (and not the straight middle) to maximize your growth and development.

Deadlift

The Case for High Reps

By now, it’s probably ingrained in you that you need to perform high reps per set (I’m looking at you, bodybuilders). Let me clarify that I define high reps to dawdle in the 8-12 rep range but could be as low as 6 reps per set.

There shouldn’t be anything really earth-shattering here. If you train with high reps, your goal is to build a bigger muscle.

Some folks call this “structural hypertrophy” since the higher rep sets allow you to focus primarily on the muscles themselves. They also lend themselves to fewer total sets per exercise. By virtue of slowing down the movement, coupled with the sheer amount of reps you do per set, you’re going to increase time under tension, which is a necessary stimulus for hypertrophy. No doubt, gains in strength will come along for the ride, but increases in muscular growth will outpace the increases in strength.

But what happens if you spend all your time here? Quite simply, your body will adapt to your training in this rep range if you continue it for extended periods of time. Furthermore, training in that zone will ultimately limit the amount of intensity you can use as well.

Do high-rep sets (15, 20, or more reps per set) have a place in programming? Sure, but they’re probably the exception rather than the rule.

The solution here is clear: Focus on getting stronger! This brings me to my next point…

The solution here is clear: Focus on getting stronger!

The Case for Low Reps

High reps deliver big gains, right? Well, low reps have a place, too!

The low-rep zone can be defined as anything between 1 rep with near-maximal effort and 5 reps in a set. They’re often viewed as being geared more for powerlifting or Olympic lifting, but if you really want to make high-threshold motor units work, you will need to push some serious weight!

This focuses on making your nervous system more efficient. If you switch from sets of 10 to sets of 3, you coerce your body to unfamiliar, shocking stressors, especially since low rep ranges encourage the use of much heavier weights. Every movement requires more “tightness” and a more intense focus. Further, more motor units and muscle fibers are recruited, and your body gets better at turning off antagonists (or opposing muscle groups) as well.

The result is that you’ll get jacked, but in a slightly different way. Since the goal is more on strength, your body composition will greatly differ from someone who performs exclusively high-rep sets. Powerlifters are strong as hell and can move jaw-dropping weight, but probably lack a bit of the size and definition of a well-trained bodybuilder.

The Perfect Combination

So if high reps promote hypertrophy and low reps facilitate strength increases, then in theory, the marriage of both rep schemes will bring forth muscular and strength development worthy of the Greek gods.

You need to spend dedicated periods of time in both the high-rep and low-rep ranges to maximize your development. High reps build muscle and connective tissue strength, and give your body respite from the grind of low-rep sets, too. Similarly, low-rep sets build neuromuscular and CNS efficiency. When you become more efficient and then go back to your big lifts, you can use even more weight than before, because you’re just that much more efficient and effective.

As an example of what I often do with physique-focused clients, I break down their set-rep schemes into one of two categories:

  • High rep – 8-12 repetitions per set
  • Low rep – 4-8 repetitions per set

These aren’t hard-and-fast rules. There may be times when even higher reps (15-20) could be used. On the flipside, there are other times when you may want to push the weight and work in the 1-5 rep range.

The biggest benefit from switching between these two ranges is that you’ll constantly coerce (there’s that word again) your body to adapt, to grow, and to improve.

Can’t I Just Train Everything at Once?

I know some people really like undulating periodization, in which you hit different set-rep schemes on different days of the week.

“You have to dial up the focus and be the orchestrator to your symphony of muscles.”

If this is you, perhaps your training looks something like this:

  • Monday – 3 sets of 10 reps
  • Wednesday – 5 sets of 5 reps
  • Friday – 10 sets of 3 reps

With this weekly program, you hit everything in one training week, thinking it’s smart, efficient training. This is true if you’re newer to lifting or have never tried a protocol like this before. However, as you get more and more advanced, this type of scenario won’t work nearly as well since you’re sending multiple mixed messages to your body.

Monday’s workout would tell your body it’s time to get big, but then Wednesday’s workout will kick your body into a bit of strength mode. Finally, Friday’s workout will run counter to Monday’s and place the emphasis on raw strength. What is a confused body to do?! As you become more proficient, you have to dial up the focus and be the orchestrator to your symphony of muscles (and thus, training).

It’s kind of why an elite level sprinter can’t simply wake up one day, decide to run a marathon, and hope to be awesome at both distances.

While I’m saying that you need to spend time on both ends of the neural-metabolic continuum, you need to have some patience and zero-in your efforts on one at a time. The general rule is to spend at least 4-6 weeks focusing on one end before you even think about heading to the other.

The Final Step

Hopefully, you’re now alternating between periods of high-rep and low-rep training—awesome! The next step is to alternate the level of intensity over the course of the training cycle. Think of the following quote: “A peak is surrounded by two valleys.” You can’t expect to go at 110 percent intensity every time you train. You’ll only burn yourself out. Layer-in days of high intensity combined with days of low intensity.

The astute reader (you!) might inquire about whether simply wavering between high and low rep ranges might already serve this purpose. It does in a rather unrefined way. Here’s an example of how I’ll set my intensity within a training month:

  • Week 1 – 4 sets of 5 reps @70%
  • Week 2 – 5 sets of 5 reps @80%
  • Week 3 – 4 sets of 3 reps @75%
  • Week 4 – 3 sets of 5 reps @85%

As you can see, I’m not trying to move the same weights or loads on a week-to-week basis.

In week 1, I build a base and get a good weight to build my base from. In week 2, I push the limits of my volume. In week 3, I deload. Basically, that means I lower the intensity and volume to make it an “easier” work week, allowing my body to recover and supercompensate. Finally, in week 4, I go for broke with regard to my intensity. Try using this for your squat sometime—it works great!

“You can’t expect to go at 110 percent intensity every time you train. You’ll only burn yourself out.”

You could also do something far simpler, which yields amazing results when you just get started:

  • Week 1 – 3 sets of 10 reps @70%
  • Week 2 – 3 sets of 8-10 reps @75%
  • Week 3 – 3 sets of 8 reps @80%
  • Week 4 – 2 sets of 8 reps @70-75%

In this example, I use a stair-step approach to prepare you for week 3. After that, you deload and get ready to run the cycle again on week 5.

With these examples, the point I’m driving home is that you can’t go hard every single week. Instead, “wave” your intensity and build up to a series of big workouts, then back off to allow your body time to recover.

It’s All About Smarter Training

If you want to get the most out of your training, you not only need to work hard, but you need to work smart. By training on both ends of the neural-metabolic continuum and incorporating undulating waves of intensity into your training cycle, you’ll not only see better results but you’ll incur fewer bumps and bruises along the way.

 

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Ask The Pro Trainer: How Important Is The Number Of Reps I Do?

I’m a trainer of celebrities and VIPs, an IFBB Men’s Physique Pro, and a fitness advocate. I’d like to help you reach your goals by answering your tough questions!

3 Ways To Extend Your Sets For New Gains

If your rep scheme isn’t getting you where you want to be, then add an additional exercise to snack on after the main course. Rest when you’re dead!

Cheat-Centrics: A Better Way To Perform Cheat Reps

Going beyond failure doesn’t have to put your spine at risk. Discover cheat-centric reps and add a valuable new muscle-building tool to your arsenal!

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High Reps, Low Reps? Which Rep Scheme Is Best?

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Break Through Plateauing Results by Training Smarter

Stuck in a rut? If you exercise regularly but can’t figure out how to smash plateaus, you’re in the right place. This plan, by IFBB fitness pro Fiona Harris, will trim inches off your thighs, tone and sculpt your arms, perk up your glute-ham tie-in, and create definition like your Insta-idol @NicoleMWilkins.

By manipulating variables such as intensity and frequency and incorporating different training techniques—like heavy/low-rep and light/high-frequency body-part splits, plus cardio, HIIT, and plyometrics—you WILL keep your body progressing right to the top.

RECOMMENDED WORKOUT WEEKLY SPLIT

  • DAY 1: Lower-Body Workout 1, Heavy Weights; 35 minutes steady-state cardio
  • DAY 2: Chest/Shoulders, StepMill HIIT Cardio
  • DAY 3: Plyometric Whole-Body Workout, Rower HIIT Cardio
  • DAY 4: Rest
  • DAY 5: Lower-Body Workout 2, High Volume; 35 minutes steady-state cardio
  • DAY 6: Back/Arms, Treadmill HIIT Cardio
  • DAY 7: Rest

Harris recommends one day of heavy lifting and one day of higher volume, as well as pairing plyo with traditional lower-body moves. Mixing high-rep training and plyometrics with heavy lifting helps provide a new stimulus to muscles.

Lower Body

Workout 1 (Heavy Weights)

  • Leg Extensions: 1½ reps (1 rep from full flexion to full extension, then ½ rep to halfway down, then up to full flexion); 1 warmup set; 7 sets of 12–15 reps.
  • Barbell back squat: 5 sets of 8–12 reps.
  • Leg press: Narrow stance (feet/ knees together) 4 sets of 10–12 reps.
  • Hack squat: Wide stance, toes pointed out, 4 sets of 8–12 reps.
  • Lying hamstring curl: 1½ reps; 4 sets of 8–12 reps.
  • Barbell hip thruster: 4 sets of 10–12 reps.
  • *Rest 45-60 seconds betweetn sets

Workout 2 (High Volume)

  • Leg extension superset with pop squat:** 1 warmup set; 4 sets of 12–15 reps/20 reps
  • Smith machine sumo squat with pulse: 4 sets of 15 reps.
  • DB reverse lunge to curtsy squat: 4 sets of 12–15 reps per leg.
  • Single-leg cable hamstring-curl superset with bent-knee kickback: 3 sets of 15 reps/15 reps.
  • Abductor machine superset with side-walking squat with resistance band: 4 sets of 15 reps/10–12 reps each direction.
  • DB walking lunge: 3 sets of 20 reps per leg.
  • *Rest 30–45 seconds between sets
  • **Superset: Do one set of each move with no rest in between sets.

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Break Through Plateauing Results by Training Smarter

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Straight Up Quads Workout for Bigger, Stronger Legs

 

When leg day rolls around, is it better to train more like a bodybuilder or an athlete? If you’re asking yourself this question (meaning you’re undecided), perhaps the answer is both. Bodybuilders train their quads for maximal hypertrophy, while football and basketball players are more interested in developing explosive power to enhance speed and jumping ability.

For a typical gym rat who’s neither a competitive bodybuilder nor a serious athlete, the best bet may just be a leg workout that incorporates mass-building principles as well as a quick dose of explosive movements. The following workout offers just that. It addresses power through box jumps; hypertrophy via front squats in a moderate rep range and drop sets of hack squats; and, for good measure, a hefty workload for your stabilizing muscle fibers with unbalanced lunges. Frankly, it’s a great routine for the guy who wants to look good from the waist down at the pool this summer and also have the ability to engage in the occasional pick-up game without getting embarrassed.

THE MOVES

Hack Squat

Keep your movements under control. Your lower body will be on fire during these drop sets, but don’t rush through the reps. The machine will help you keep your form strict, but still concentrate on keeping your lower back flat or slightly arched (not rounded).

Unbalanced Walking Lunge

The intention of this exercise is to train core stability and balance while also working the quads and glutes. Hold a moderate-weight dumbbell or kettlebell in one hand while you do lunges, keeping the other hand free. Focus on keeping your torso upright throughout – don’t let yourself lean to the side holding the weight.

Front Squat

Treat this as your big lift for the day. The 8-10-rep range is designed to promote hypertrophy, so you should be coming close to failure on all four sets. You want to be strong on every set, so don’t skimp on rest periods. Take 2-3 minutes between sets.

Box Jump

Doing an explosive jumping exercise further warms up the lower body while activating the fast-twitch muscle fibers you’ll be calling on for front squats. Go with a 20- to 30-inch plyo box. If you don’t have one available, use a weight bench instead.

THE WARMUP

Precede this workout with a five- to 10-minute low-intensity warmup on the cardio machine of your choice.

 

Straight Up Quads Workout for Bigger, Stronger Legs

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The Go Small to Get Big Arms Workout

Big exercises build big arms. You can isolate your biceps and triceps as often as you’d like with low-weight exercises like kickbacks and concentration curls, but it’s compound moves, using heavy loads, that will make your arms grow.

Take a look at the workout below. The first exercises you’ll see on each training day are relatively big arm movements like weighted bench dips, skull crushers, and barbell curls. The lighter stuff comes last, when your arms are too spent to do much more. Gaining mass and size is all about priorities, and if your objective is to build bigger arms, start with big moves and finish with smaller ones.

TRICEPS WORKOUT

EXERCISE 1

WEIGHTED BENCH DIP

exercise image placeholder
3sets
8-12reps
60-90 secrest
If you can, perform 4 or 5 sets.

EXERCISE 2

SKULL CRUSHER

exercise image placeholder
3sets
8-12reps
45-60 secrest
If you can, perform 4 sets.

EXERCISE 3

CABLE PRESSDOWNYou’ll need: Adjustable Cable Machine, V-Handle AttachmentHow to

Cable Pressdown thumbnail
3sets
10-15reps
45-60 secrest
If you can, perform 4 sets.

BICEPS WORKOUT

EXERCISE 1

BARBELL BICEPS CURLYou’ll need: BarbellHow to

bicep curl thumbnail
3sets
6-12reps
60-90 secrest
If you can, perform 4 or 5 sets.

EXERCISE 2

ALTERNATING DUMBBELL BICEPS CURLYou’ll need: DumbbellsHow to

Alternating Dumbbell Biceps Curl thumbnail
3sets
8-12reps
45-60 secrest
If you can, perform 4 sets.

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The Go Small to Get Big Arms Workout

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The Best Full Shoulder Workout Routine

Just about every Muscle & Fitness reader knows that to build cannonball delts, you need to start with heavy presses followed by an isolation exercise for each of the three deltoid heads. Astute readers even cycle the order in which they train each deltoid head from one workout to the next, knowing that the move that comes first will be trained harder as energy levels and focus are higher earlier in the workout.

This workout takes that training philosophy one step further for hardcore gains. After a pair of compound moves, you’’ll do two shoulder exercises back-to-back for the targeted deltoid head (Shoulder Workout No. 1 focuses on the front head, Workout No. 2 the middle and Workout No. 3 the rear delt head). The first of the “focused delt” moves is done just slightly heavier than what you may be accustomed to for three sets of eight reps, followed by a machine move where you just have to push a weight, not balance it,— for that same delt head. You’’ll also be doing drop sets on each set of the machine move.

Finish off with exercises for each of the remaining delt heads done for straight sets, and don’’t forget to rotate workouts next time you train shoulders. Pretty soon, we’’ll have to start writing even more advanced programs for you. Trust us, we will!

 WORKOUT Front Delt

EXERCISE 1

SMITH MACHINE OVERHEAD PRESS

You’ll need: Smith Machine, Bench How to

Smith Machine Overhead Press thumbnail
3sets
15, 10, 6reps
rest
Includes 1-2 warm-up sets, but do as many as you need.

EXERCISE 2

DUMBBELL UPRIGHT ROW

You’ll need: Dumbbells How to

Dumbbell Upright Row thumbnail
3sets
10reps
rest

EXERCISE 3

DUMBBELL FRONT RAISE

You’ll need: Dumbbells How to

Front Raise thumbnail
3sets
8reps
rest

EXERCISE 4

ONE-ARM MACHINE FRONT RAISE

exercise image placeholder
3sets
10/8reps
rest
Train the second move for the targeted delt head with drop sets. After reaching muscle failure, quickly reduce the weight.

EXERCISE 5

SEATED LATERAL RAISE

You’ll need: Dumbbells, Bench How to

Seated Lateral Raise thumbnail
2sets
10reps
rest

EXERCISE 6

SINGLE-ARM STANDING CABLE REVERSE FLYEYou’ll need: Adjustable Cable Machine, D-Handle Attachment How to

Single-Arm Standing Cable Reverse Flye thumbnail
2sets
10reps
rest

WORKOUT 2Middle Delt

EXERCISE 1

SEATED DUMBBELL SHOULDER PRESS

You’ll need: Dumbbells, Bench How to

Seated Dumbbell Shoulder Press thumbnail
3sets
15, 10, 6reps
rest
Includes 1-2 warm-up sets, but do as many as you need.

EXERCISE 2

SMITH MACHINE OVERHEAD PRESS

You’ll need: Smith Machine, Bench How to

Smith Machine Overhead Press thumbnail
3sets
10reps
rest

EXERCISE 3

DUMBBELL LATERAL RAISE

You’ll need: Dumbbells How to

Dumbbell Lateral Raise thumbnail
3sets
8reps
rest

EXERCISE 4

MACHINE LATERAL RAISE

exercise image placeholder
3sets
10/8reps
rest
Train the second move for the targeted delt head with drop sets. After reaching muscle failure, quickly reduce the weight.

EXERCISE 5

BENT-OVER CABLE LATERAL RAISE

exercise image placeholder
2sets
10reps
rest

EXERCISE 6

DUMBBELL FRONT RAISE

You’ll need: Dumbbells How to

Front Raise thumbnail
2sets
10reps
rest

WORKOUT 3Rear Delt

EXERCISE 1

DUMBBELL FRONT RAISE

You’ll need: Dumbbells How to

Front Raise thumbnail
3sets
15, 10, 6reps
rest
Includes 1-2 warm-up sets, but do as many as you need.

EXERCISE 2

ARNOLD PRESS

You’ll need: Dumbbells How to

Arnold Press thumbnail
3sets
10reps
rest

EXERCISE 3

BENT-OVER LATERAL RAISE

You’ll need: Dumbbells How to

Bent-Over Lateral Raise thumbnail
3sets
8reps
rest

EXERCISE 4

REVERSE PEC DECK FLYE

exercise image placeholder
3sets
10/8reps
rest
Train the second move for the targeted delt head with drop sets. After reaching muscle failure, quickly reduce the weight.

EXERCISE 5

FRONT CABLE RAISE

exercise image placeholder

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The Best Full Shoulder Workout Routine

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Personal Fitness Training, Training Methods, Warm up, Weight loss, Weight TrainingComments Off on The Best Full Shoulder Workout Routine

Image EZ-Bar20Curl.jpg

Blast Your Biceps & Triceps, Fast

The biceps and triceps are ideal muscles to superset, as they directly oppose each other. The biceps flex the elbow joint, while the triceps extend it. While one works the other rests, and vice versa, which allows you to cut work time in half while not sacrificing load or intensity.

SEE ALSO: 7 Ways to Make Your Biceps Workout Harder

The arm workout below consists of three superset pairings. The first duo hits the biceps and triceps with heavy weight and relatively low reps (6–8) on two barbell exercises to help spur muscle growth and strength; the second uses moderate weight and moderate reps (8–12) to fall in the hypertrophy sweet spot; and the third superset gets lighter with higher reps (12–15) and cable exercises— one being a hammer curl, which brings the forearms into play more—to finish the arms off with a great burn and a rush of blood. Do this workout on its own or after training a larger area like chest, back, or legs.

SUPERSET ARM ROUTINE

EXERCISE SETS REPS
EZ-bar Curl 4 6-8
Lying EZ-bar Extension 4 6-8
Seated Dumbbell Overhead Extension 3 8-12
Seated Dumbbell Curl 3 8-12
Cable Rope Hammer Curl 3 12-15
Cable Pushdown 3 12-15

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Blast Your Biceps & Triceps, Fast

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Health Issues, Nutrition, Personal Fitness Training, Training Methods, Warm up, Weight loss, Weight TrainingComments Off on Blast Your Biceps & Triceps, Fast

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Caroline Wozniacki Goes Topless in ‘SI Swimsuit’ Behind-The-Scenes Video

Great news, Sports Illustrated just put together a behind the scenes video for one of their hottest swimsuit models, and it’s the best thing ever created.

Who is she? The model is Danish tennis star Caroline Wozniacki, who has been featured for her third straight year in Sports Illustrated’s Swimsuit edition.

SEE ALSO: Look At The Sexiest Tennis Players in 2017 ‘SI Swimsuit Edition’

In this year’s issue, Wozniacki looks better than ever as she goes topless, working a sexy arm bra, and rocking a colorful thong bikini.

Check out a few of her photos below.

If one thing is for certain, Wozniacki is a bombshell, and Sports Illustrated agrees.

Caroline Wozniacki Goes Topless in ‘SI Swimsuit’ Behind-The-Scenes Video

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