Tag Archive | "people"

Fitness Tips-Make fitness a hobby

It is rare for me to make a blanket statement when describing my clients. Although many share similar goals, all of them come from different walks of life and encounter unique challenges. However, one thing that I can say every single one of my clients has struggled with is consistency.

It seems that everyone has a story to share about a time when they “were doing awesome,” or “felt amazing.” For every positive memory there is the corresponding down-swing that played out that they are less fond of recounting. I see it as my task as a coach to help my clients appreciate the power of carefully positioning their relationship with their fitness program so that it remains enjoyable and thus they stick with it.

Have you ever considered visualizing physical fitness and clean eating/dieting as a hobby? For many the answer is no. The funny thing is that people are far more likely to participate in something that they enjoy versus something that they don’t. Specialized hobbies such as weight training, running, and nutrition, for example, require a lot of work, but as with many hobbies you will become more and more proficient with time.

When a client begins my program I often explain to them that, like most hobbies, they won’t be great from the start. I explain that like any discipline they will get better with practice and learn to appreciate each and every meal/snack and workout more and more as they have time to discover their potential. Before long my clients are able to see that their relationship with clean eating and working out has moved from something that they “have to do” to something that they are “happy to do.”

Work, on the other hand, is often dull and rarely becomes more enjoyable as you get better at it. Work is something that we often try to avoid. It doesn’t take much to find a rational distraction that we can use to get away from it. Examples of excuses that I hear all of the time include: “I don’t have the time,” or “I can’t work out at night, that’s the only time that I have to see my husband,” or “work was hard today, I will go to the gym tomorrow.”

I don’t mean to sound negative here, but I can’t express just how many times I have seen a potential client fail to realize how much they are missing out on by skipping workouts and eating poorly. As I mentioned before hobbies are enjoyable. People don’t search for excuses to rationalize getting out of a fishing trip, a shopping spree at the crafts store, or going to a Pats game. Yes, skipping your workouts and failing to plan and/or prepare meals for the week may free up several hours, but at what cost?

Workouts and clean eating reduce stress and boost virtually every aspect of your being from your health to your attitude; they are hobbies that act as life-enhancers. By making a seemingly subtle mental adjustment from “I have to exercise and eat right,” to “I am going to make a hobby out of exercising and eating right,” you may notice yourself making less excuses and possibly, just possibly, start to enjoy them as your favorite and most essential hobbies.

Coach Chris McHugh is the fitness coach and manager at Get In Shape For Women in Westwood. Please send questions, suggestions, or topic ideas to ChrismcHugh@getinshapeforwomen.com.

 

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Fitness Tips-Make fitness a hobby

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The Truth About Weight Loss

 

The start of every health kick can be a glorious time, with your motivation at its highest and the fitness gains at their easiest to come by. Your muscles might be aching, and your diet could be missing a few unhealthy favourites, but the weight will be dropping off like nobody’s business.

At some point, however, you might find that whatever efforts you make in the gym or the kitchen do not result in any further losses when you step on the scales.

Your weight plateaus, or perhaps even nudges slightly upwards. Obviously, this can be the ultimate motivation killer if your main goal is weight loss, but a simple scales reading can be misleading when it comes to your general health.More important than how much you weigh is your body composition – namely how much of your body is made up of fat, muscle, bones, water, assorted organs, and so on.

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The Truth About Weight Loss

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Get virtual with your next challenge

Get virtual with your next challenge ArticleSep 16, 2016Looking for a new way to push yourself? Mix up your routine with this unique endurance challengeFancy yourself a bit of a challenge? Here’s one with a twist: The Conqueror Event Series is launching its inaugural UK John O’Groats Virtual Challenge. Starting 1 October, the 1083-mile event has both teams and individuals complete the longest route in Britain, recording their distances and seeing themselves and others advancing on the map towards the finish line

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Get virtual with your next challenge

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Top facts about exercising in the cold

Separate the freezing facts from fiction with the low down from a Fitness First expert:

1. Burning more calories in the cold is actually a myth, the body actually uses more energy cooling down in the heat than it does in the cold.

2. As per point one, exercising in colder temperatures is healthier than exercising in summer because we use less energy to warm up in winter than we do to cool down in summer

3. As per evolutionary theory, we tend to store more fat in winter to keep ourselves warm and with that comes weight gain, so exercising in the winter is actually more relevant for that reason

4. In the winter most of us divulge in alcohol and enjoy ourselves more, alcohol actually encourages heat loss in the body, so when we do exercise outside it makes it harder to stay warm

5. In summer we drink a lot of water, whereas in winter we’re not as aware that we’re dehydrated. This is dangerous as when we reach this point the body loses the ability to regulate temperature, so hydrating in winter is actually more important

6. Static stretching in the cold brings an injury risk, because muscles have the same elastic properties as a band if you stretch too quickly without the appropriate range of movement, the muscle can tear. Aim for dynamic movements as these will increase blood flow to muscle and therefore warm them quicker, whilst improving joint flexibility as well. They will also activate more muscles rather than isolated stretching.

7. Protect hands and feet. Heat loss tends to come from the hands, feet and head, so wear gloves, good socks and a hat and you’ll tend to find it easier to regulate temperature. It’s not about wearing a fleece, it’s about protecting the places that heat escapes from.

8. Stay dry. If you run in the winter and you sweat into cotton, it will stay wet and won’t dry. Therefore your body struggles to heat up due to the wet cotton. Wear dry fit material which will dry quickly as you work out.

9. Avoid over dressing. A lot of people wrap up warm when they work out outside. You risk excessive sweating which can cause dehydration and use excessive amounts of energy. It’s ok to start a run cold as you will warm up and your body will self-regulate your temperature.

10. There is a risk of slipping in the winter so wear a rubber studded sole to ensure you have grip.

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Top facts about exercising in the cold

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Why you need to start cycling today!

Women’s cycling is on the rise thanks to an amazing new bunch of girls, kit and enthusiasm for life on two wheels.Since London 2012 we’ve been enjoying a cycling revolution in the UK, and WF is a team chock-full of cyclists so we couldn’t be happier! From increased bike sales and routes to a government investment of £588 million to make UK cities easier and safer to get around on a bike, it’s now the time to get in the saddle and ride.Viva la revolution! We’ve been speaking to Team Ford EcoBoost to discover more. ‘We never imagined we would be where we are now when we started cycling, so to see the growth in the sport in such a short space of time is just fantastic,’ explains Team rider Julie Erskine

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Why you need to start cycling today!

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Train your brain!

The era when sports stars concentrated solely on physical prep is long gone. 

Today, they are just as likely to use psychological techniques to improve their game. As cognitive hypnotherapist Hazel Gale (hazelgale.co.uk) says, ‘People are realising it’s scientific, not woo-woo.’ Hazel is the current UK women’s welterweight boxing champion and former double world women’s kickboxing champion. Not a lady to argue with then. 

Performance consultant Andy Barton (thesportingmind.com) is a sports psychologist who also uses Neuro Linguistic Programming (NLP) and Neuro Feedback to help people. He says, ‘65% of my clients are sports people, but the others are actors, musicians and just people who need to perform better.’ Indeed, brain training is not only useful in the gym – it could also increase your self-confidence, lift your mood and stop you procrastinating.

Research into the benefits of brain training is building. US research into basketball players, for example, has shown that those who visualise getting the ball in the hoop before they shoot are more likely to score. Another US study from 2013 showed participants who visualised exercising their biceps displayed a 13% increase in muscle strength. The reason is that visualisation activates electromyographical (EMG) activity in muscles similar to that which occurs in actual movement.

Mental Rehearsal

What is it? This is a visualisation technique in which you assume the identity of someone famous or successful in order to copy them and improve your own ‘game’.

How to do it: Think of a sports person who is able to do what you want to do. Maybe it’s Paula Radcliffe if you are a runner or Rebecca Adlington if you’re a swimmer. Now, close your eyes and imagine you’ve got a TV and remote control. Press play and watch a film of your hero practising the skill you want to perfect. Press pause and rewind. Play the film again. This time keep your mentor’s head, but visualise your body performing the same task faultlessly. Press pause, rewind and play again, this time with your head and your body, again doing everything well. Repeat this process once more, but this time step inside the film so that you’re actually feeling what it is like to perform so well. Press pause, step out of the film, look at yourself excelling, breathe in and relax.

What it’s best for: Perfecting tricky techniques that you don’t think you can do, such as a slam dunk in basketball or a serve in tennis.

Outside the gym: The Mental Rehearsal is really helpful if you want to perfect any skill, whether it’s cracking an egg with one hand or playing the violin. 

2 Process Thinking

What is it? When you want to achieve something, it is normal to set a goal and then try to reach it. However, this creates performance pressure that may prevent you reaching your goal. Process Thinking is a way of focusing on the present
to reduce this pressure.

How to do it: Set your goal then mentally set this aside. Maybe write it on a piece of paper and put it in a drawer. Then focus on the process of training without thinking ahead. If you do your best each time you work out, you will get to your goal and eliminate anxiety along the way.

What it’s best for: It works well for sports such as triathlon, which require a long training period.

Outside the gym: Any task where the goal is a long way off, e.g. if you have a lot of weight to lose.

3 Resource Anchor

What is it?This is based on the idea that we associate different states (happy, sad, excited, etc.) with ‘anchors’ i.e. sights, sounds, smells or tastes. The key is to anchor one of these senses to a frame of mind (a ‘resource state’) that helps you in your sport.

How to do it: The easiest and most effective Resource Anchor to create is a sound. An experiment conducted at Brunel University in 2001 found that music combined with imagery was more effective than imagery alone at helping athletes complete an isometric endurance task. Choose a song or songs that give you a feeling of energy and power. Now, sit quietly, close your eyes and remember a time when you trained well or competed successfully. As you see yourself excelling, switch on the music
and allow the sound to become associated with the feeling of success. Repeat this three or four times and then play the song whenever you train.

What it’s best for: Endurance exercise like running or cycling where the music helps you to dissociate you from the effort, aching limbs or sore feet.  

Outside the gym: If something makes you nervous (e.g. public speaking), you can create a relaxation anchor using a song that helps you to keep calm. Hum your chosen song quietly just before you have to speak to instantly calm yourself down.

Flick It Out, Lock It In

What is it? A favourite of Hazel’s, this duo of cognitive techniques helps you to ‘own’ your positive experiences and ‘throw away’ your negative experiences. 

How to do it: If you have a really good training session, win a race or set a personal best in anything, lift one arm, bend it as if you are doing a classic bicep curl, then as you clench your fist, pull it in to your chest. This ‘locks in’ the success. If you don’t do so well, ‘flick it out’ by taking the flat of one hand and brushing yourself down.

What it’s best for: Competitive sports with matches that you win or lose, or sports such as weight training or gymnastics that require you to perform difficult manoeuvres you can succeed or fail at.

Outside the gym: In competitive work environments such as sales where missing targets can affect your confidence.

Power Pose

What is it? A technique favoured by Andy, Power Pose is based on the idea that body language is infectious. ‘If you are fearful, you adopt fearful body language (you make yourself small by slumping down) and this body language increases your feeling of fearfulness,’ he explains. Power Pose completely reverses this process.

How to do it: Stand with your feet slightly apart, your head up and your shoulders back. Lift your arms up and out as if you are running through a tape at the end of a race. Breathe deeply and hold that position for one to two minutes.

What it’s best for: Increasing your energy and focus for short, explosive exercise such as sprinting or diving. This makes it particularly good just before the start of a race.

Outside the gym: Fantastic just before a difficult meeting or tricky phone call. It can give you the confidence to deliver bad news or ask for a pay rise.

Change Internal Dialogue

What is it? ‘A lot of us do ourselves down with self talk,’ says Hazel. This is the critical voice in our heads that many of us have. Change Internal Dialogue is a technique that takes the sting out of that inner voice.

How to do it: Close your eyes and think about some of the negative things you think about yourself, e.g. ‘I’m useless’, ‘I’m not fast enough’, ‘I’ll never win’, etc. While listening to this litany of internal criticism, alter the voice into that of Bugs Bunny or Homer Simpson. Immediately, whatever they are saying sounds ridiculously silly rather than powerful or strong.

What it’s best for: Events where you might hit a mental wall, e.g. mile 20 of a marathon or any exercise where self-doubt is holding you back, e.g. ‘I’ll never be able
to do 10 press-ups!’.

Outside the gym: A great all-round self-esteem lifter, Change Internal Dialogue can be used whenever you start to doubt your abilities, whatever the context.  

WHAT’S YOUR MANTRA?

Mantras are one of the most abused areas of psychology, but framed correctly they can be very effective. Here are the rules to remember:

• Use positive language If you say ‘I’m not nervous’, the brain doesn’t hear the ‘not’. It hears ‘nervous’ and your anxiety builds. Better to say ‘I am confident’. 

• Be realistic There’s no point saying ‘I’m going to be a world-class gymnast’ if you can barely get through a Zumba class. Better to say ‘I will get fitter’.

• Mean what you say ‘Mantras won’t work unless the body language and tone of voice is right,’ says Andy. Stand tall with your shoulders back and your head up – and speak confidently.

• Keep it broad A Greek study from 2006 found that motivational self talk, such as ‘I can do it!’, worked better than instructional self talk  such as ‘hit the ball!’.

MAGNIFICENT MANTRAS

‘I can, I will, I am’ (as in I can do it, I will do it, I am doing it). This creates belief and builds determination to do anything.

‘I will treat my body with love and respect. My body deserves this and I deserve this.’ Helps build resolve to be healthy and boosts self-esteem.

‘Just do it.’ The famous Nike slogan helps combat procrastination and silences a critical internal voice. 

Lowri Turner is a nutritionist/hypnotherapist

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‘It’s massively rewarding’

From the sea cliffs of Wales to the Atlas Mountains of Morocco, Hazel Findlay’s passion for climbing has taken her all over the world. She tells us how self-belief can spur you on to do almost anything you can imagine – even paragliding!

How did you get into climbing? 
I started out with my dad on the sea cliffs in Pembroke when I was seven. I was lucky to start so early because climbing has really made me who I am.

What is it that you love about the sport? 
I love how it takes you to amazing corners of the world that you wouldn’t get to otherwise. I also love the feeling of moving over rock and the mental battles associated with climbing.

What’s the toughest thing about climbing? 
The toughest thing about climbing is believing that you can do something. It always feels really easy to walk away from a rock climb if you think it’s going to be hard, but it’s massively rewarding when you don’t walk away and you give it a go, even if you fail.

You’ve climbed in lots of amazing places. Where’s your favourite place to climb? 
I really love the Atlas Mountains in Morocco. The people are amazing and the scenery is something special – it’s very impressive and rugged, but also very peaceful.

Who or what inspires you? 
All the climbers who love the sport and keep getting out every day despite injury, weather, work or life problems.

Have you always been active? 
Yes, I’ve always been active and if I’m not climbing for whatever reason, I’ll be running or doing yoga or something. We are supposed to be active and I think a lot of the problems with the modern human are tied up in the fact that most of us live hugely underactive lives.

What other sports do you enjoy other than climbing? 
Yoga, running and I’ve just taken up paragliding.

What’s the best way for our readers to get into climbing?   
Take a course where you will learn all the relevant safety skills you need to know to get out and about on your own. Climbing walls are great, but lots of people get stuck in them and find it hard to venture out – so if you can, start outside.  

What’s your biggest goal? I don’t really have a biggest goal or dream, but since I’ve just recently started paragliding, one dream I have is to do some flying/climbing combined adventures. I think that would be really great.  

Hazel is sponsored by Ellis Brigham Mountain Sports (ellis-brigham.com)

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‘It’s massively rewarding’

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‘It’s massively rewarding’

From the sea cliffs of Wales to the Atlas Mountains of Morocco, Hazel Findlay’s passion for climbing has taken her all over the world. She tells us how self-belief can spur you on to do almost anything you can imagine – even paragliding!

How did you get into climbing? 
I started out with my dad on the sea cliffs in Pembroke when I was seven. I was lucky to start so early because climbing has really made me who I am.

What is it that you love about the sport? 
I love how it takes you to amazing corners of the world that you wouldn’t get to otherwise. I also love the feeling of moving over rock and the mental battles associated with climbing.

What’s the toughest thing about climbing? 
The toughest thing about climbing is believing that you can do something. It always feels really easy to walk away from a rock climb if you think it’s going to be hard, but it’s massively rewarding when you don’t walk away and you give it a go, even if you fail.

You’ve climbed in lots of amazing places. Where’s your favourite place to climb? 
I really love the Atlas Mountains in Morocco. The people are amazing and the scenery is something special – it’s very impressive and rugged, but also very peaceful.

Who or what inspires you? 
All the climbers who love the sport and keep getting out every day despite injury, weather, work or life problems.

Have you always been active? 
Yes, I’ve always been active and if I’m not climbing for whatever reason, I’ll be running or doing yoga or something. We are supposed to be active and I think a lot of the problems with the modern human are tied up in the fact that most of us live hugely underactive lives.

What other sports do you enjoy other than climbing? 
Yoga, running and I’ve just taken up paragliding.

What’s the best way for our readers to get into climbing?   
Take a course where you will learn all the relevant safety skills you need to know to get out and about on your own. Climbing walls are great, but lots of people get stuck in them and find it hard to venture out – so if you can, start outside.  

What’s your biggest goal? I don’t really have a biggest goal or dream, but since I’ve just recently started paragliding, one dream I have is to do some flying/climbing combined adventures. I think that would be really great.  

Hazel is sponsored by Ellis Brigham Mountain Sports (ellis-brigham.com)

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‘It’s massively rewarding’

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<div id="DPG" webReader="271.593675993"><div class="side-bar" webReader="-13.1859296482"><div class="c10"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/ric-drasin-vital-stats-box.jpg"/></div><h3 class="article-title c11">Vital Stats</h3><a href="https://www.facebook.com/ric.drasin" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Facebook"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/facebook-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c12"/></a><a href="https://twitter.com/ricdrasin" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Twitter"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/twitter-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c13"/></a><a href="http://instagram.com/ricdrasin#" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Instagram"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/instagram-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c13"/></a><a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/ricdrasin" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="YouTube"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/youtube-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c13"/></a><p><strong>Name:</strong> Ric Drasin<br /><strong>Occupation:</strong> Artist, actor, talk show host, former professional wrestler, creator of the Gold's Gym logo<br /><strong>Location:</strong> Van Nuys, CA<br /><strong>Website:</strong> <a href="www.ricdrasin.com" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">www.ricdrasin.com</a>, <a href="www.ricscorner.com" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">www.ricscorner.com</a></p></div><p>I still remember the first time I walked in the door at Gold's Gym in 1970. I had been training at Bill Pearl's gym in Inglewood for most of the past year and seeing great results, but a few of my friends had convinced me to make the switch. I was trying to make my name as a wrestler, not a bodybuilder, but I knew this was the place to build an elite body.</p><p>Right away, I saw greats like Dave Draper, Frank Zane, Ken Waller, and Eddie Giuliani training together. Then I saw Arnold. Come to think of it, everyone noticed when he came in the room. He was about 260 pounds, huge, and in great shape. We had met once before, but once I was at Gold's, we quickly became friends and started doing some chest and back workouts together. We were on the same page with training, and even better, had a similar sense of humor.</p><p>Over the next few years, I had a unique window into what drove Arnold during his peak competitive years, as I've often discussed on my online show <a href="http://videos.bodybuilding.com/tags/drasin">Ric's Corner</a>. He was able to achieve things that no one else from our community did, and it wasn't by accident. Here's what made Arnold—the bodybuilder, the star, and the man—great.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">1 He loved to train</h3>
</p><p>Sure, the workouts we did were hard and grueling. But we also knew that training is supposed to be fun, so we made it that way. Arnold trained hard, and there were no secrets to his gains other than pounding out the sets and reps with good heavy weights. Of course we all eventually had injuries to deal with that changed the game, but in the early days, there was nothing more fun than intense, heavy training with classic movements.</p><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-main.html"><img src="images/2014/15-things-that-made-arnold-great-graphics-1.jpg" width="560" height="315" border="0"/></a><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">2 He used variety—but not too much</h3>
</p><p>Arnold liked to vary the exercises and throw in new movements weekly to change things up, but the sets and reps usually stayed pretty consistent. The <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-main.html">Arnold Blueprint trainer</a> is a good representation of the sort of work he did. Nevertheless, he knew that there were some movements that always needed to be a priority. For instance, we would occasionally compete in bench press, primarily because Arnold was so competitive and I always had a slight edge on that lift. My best was 455 pounds, and I think his was around 440.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">3 He liked old-fashioned cardio</h3>
</p><p>Today, it seems like nearly everybody in the weight room has built a wall around themselves in the form of a pair of headphones. This is even more the case when it comes to cardio, where you watch TV while you work the treadmill or bike. Talk about solitary confinement! Back in our day, there were none of these machines, and "cardio" was a run on the beach. It was fun, social, and <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/a-day-in-arnolds-life.html">as Arnold has said recently</a>, it was the best way to build a tan that didn't suck.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">4 He relied on proven nutrition principles</h3>
</p><p>When we were training at our peak, supplements were pretty limited. Sure, we had protein at times, but that was about as far as it went, so most of what we built was powered by eating real food—and <em>good</em> food. I'm talking about high protein, high fat, and limited carbs, like nutrition experts are starting to advocate more and more these days. Funny how it all comes around.</p><img src="images/2014/15-things-that-made-arnold-great-graphics-2.jpg" width="560" height="326" border="0"/><p>"Most of what we built was powered by eating real food—and <em>good</em> food. I'm talking about high protein, high fat, and limited carbs."</p><p>Our hangout was Zucky's Delicatessen in Santa Monica, and everyone there knew us—especially after Arnold began dating the hostess. Every night we would head over for a cheese omelet, our final helping of protein.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">5 He learned from his training</h3>
</p><p>People talk about someone having a "winning personality," but until they've met Arnold, they've never really seen it in its purest form. He approached every situation with the expectation that he would get what he wanted, both inside the gym and out.</p><p>He trained hard, ate right and saw his future place in a bigger picture. He knew discipline was the key if the end result was going to be good. He paid his dues overcoming a language barrier, becoming a United States citizen, and learning his way in a new country. From the start, the gym was his home base and most comfortable environment. Once he found his way there, he attacked everything else in his life in the same way.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">6 His strategic charm</h3>
</p><p>Arnold was a great negotiator and would make deals with companies around the world to use his name as it grew. He'd get supplements, cars, and just about anything else he'd ask for. His charm was the key to his greatness. He could charm anyone out of anything, and people really liked him. I haven't seen anyone like him since. Bodybuilders today could really learn from this, although it was really just his natural way.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">7 His non-strategic charm</h3>
</p><img src="images/2014/15-things-that-made-arnold-great-graphics-3.jpg" width="281" height="331" border="0" class="float-right c15"/><p>"Arnold was very good at getting attention, but he was also attentive to others."</p><p>Arnold had the personality and charisma to attract people, and he loved every minute of it. He was very good at getting attention, but he was also attentive to others, which made everyone feel comfortable around him. Although he was huge and imposing, his personality was the opposite.</p><p>My mom, who lived to 97, always told her friends of the time that I brought Arnold over to her house and she made dinner for him, me, and my grandmother. He and my grandmother were from the same city in Austria, and it was quite a fun night where they had a lot to talk about. Both my mother and grandmother remembered that night for as long as they lived, but not just because Arnold was famous. It was because he made time for them, and because he was a fun guy, a great listener, and a natural storyteller.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">8 He shared</h3>
</p><p>People sometimes portray Arnold as a kind of egomaniac, but the truth is that he was very generous when it came helping others. He introduced me to <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/the-protein-pioneer-lessons-from-a-golden-age-nutritional-guru.html">Rheo Blair</a>, who at that time was the guru of supplements and famous for his Blair's Protein, which was the best around and the most expensive. He set me up with Blair to do modeling with product ads in exchange for free supplements. Every month I could load up, and this was due to Arnold. He didn't have to do this; he simply wanted to help me.</p><img src="images/2014/15-things-that-made-arnold-great-graphics-4.jpg" width="560" height="456" border="0" class="c17"/><h6 class="altH6 c18">"Rheo Blair Golden-Age Nutrition Guru."</h6><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">9 He wasn't afraid to fail</h3>
</p><p>One day Arnold mentioned that he had a movie audition and asked if I would go with him, since there may be a role for me. I agreed, and later that night we drove up to Burbank. The dialogue was kind of biblical-sounding, complicated, and hard to read. Arnold stumbled over the words, and we both ended up laughing our way through it.</p><p>The producers didn't really care, because they liked Arnold anyway. We got back into the car and Arnold asked what I thought about it. I told him that he sucked and should forget acting altogether. Little did I know who he would become.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">10 His persistence</h3>
</p><p>He wouldn't take no for an answer on any level, and had extreme confidence when asking for something. I took a ride with him out to Joe Weider's office to collect some money for expenses. When we got there, Arnold asked Joe for a check, and Joe tried to hold him off. Arnold responded by reaching into Joe's jacket, pulling out the checkbook, and filling out a check. Then he said, "Joe, sign it." Of course Joe did. Arnold was incredibly persistent when going after something he wanted, and Joe loved Arnold, so it always worked out.</p><img src="images/2014/15-things-that-made-arnold-great-graphics-5.jpg" width="560" height="386" border="0"/><p>"Arnold wouldn't take no for an answer on any level, and had extreme confidence when asking for something."</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">11 His sense of humor</h3>
</p><p>As countless people can attest, Arnold was great at helping people in the gym, even when he didn't know them. However, his sense of humor would sometimes get away from him. Once, he took one of the gym members up to the dressing room and had him pose naked, screaming when he'd flex his biceps and growling when going into a most-muscular shot. He also had the guy pose and rub down with motor oil. I'm sure the guy felt pretty stupid afterward, but in the long run, hijinks like these helped make the gym a more fun place for all of us to spend so many long hours.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">12 He could multitask</h3>
</p><p>At some point during the years we trained together, Arnold decided acting was the next thing for him. He had a vision of where he could take it, and he studied acting and put his best effort into it. He also began rubbing elbows with the right people, and sure enough, when doors opened for him, his charm took him through those doors to greater things.</p><img src="images/2014/15-things-that-made-arnold-great-graphics-6.jpg" width="560" height="292" border="0"/><p>"His drive, focus, and discipline were far beyond the average person, and he could apply these attributes wherever and however heneeded in order to achieve his goals."</p><p>But here's the amazing part: His bodybuilding didn't suffer at all as a result. He still competed in and won Mr. Olympia while pursuing acting and thriving in numerous other moneymaking projects. His drive, focus, and discipline were far beyond the average person, and he could apply these attributes wherever and however he needed in order to achieve his goals.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">13 He was always Arnold</h3>
</p><p>As Arnold's success in bodybuilding turned into success in films, he began meeting and befriending more and more influential people. At that point, he went off in a different direction from the rest of us at Gold's Gym, and a different group of people gathered around him. It changed again once he got involved with politics. But Arnold was always Arnold. Every once in a while, he would show up at a memorial for one of our friends, and it was the same old Arnold around us, as just one of the guys.</p><p>Every now and then, he still shows up down in Venice on his bike or in his car, and he's incredibly open and friendly to every kid and fan he meets down there. Just like in the old days, pretty much everyone who crosses paths with him remembers it afterward with a smile.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">14 He stuck to his roots</h3>
</p><img src="images/2014/15-things-that-made-arnold-great-graphics-7.jpg" width="185" height="326" border="0" class="float-right c15"/><p>It's amazing that after all those years and all his accomplishments, Arnold has always kept his love for bodybuilding. At a time when he was a huge movie star, he still found time to <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-a-z-the-essential-arnold-schwarzenegger-library.html">write books that explained exactly how to achieve their physical potential</a>. And today he's still at it, promoting the <a href="http://arnoldsportsfestival.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Arnold Sports Festival</a> in the states and abroad, living the fitness lifestyle and doing what he loves best.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">15 He wasn't afraid to grow</h3>
</p><p>He's the only person on Earth who has succeeded dramatically in the worlds of bodybuilding, film, and politics. He had one of the best bodies in the world, was one of the largest box office draws in history, and became Governor of California in a landslide victory. None of these things happened by accident. They all took a lot of work and study. No one handed anything to him; he worked hard for all of it. And the prize is that his name, face, and body are recognized around the world.</p><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/arnold-schwarzenegger-series/blueprint-to-mass-stack.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/arnold-blueprint_stack_bannerbig-b.jpg" width="560" height="360" class="c19"/></a><br class="c20"/><h3 class="article-title">Recommended For You</h3><div class="c23" webReader="5.00917431193"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-mass-training.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/arnold-blueprint_training_overview_sm.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c22" webReader="6.16513761468"><h4 class="c21"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-mass-training.html">Arnold's Blueprint Trainer: Mass Training Overview</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Watch this video to learn some of Arnold Schwarzenegger's favorite exercises and preferred training techniques for building muscle. Get the knowledge you need to grow!</p></div></div><div class="c23" webReader="5.02008928571"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-mass-nutrition.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/arnold-blueprint_nutrition_overview_smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c22" webReader="6.17857142857"><h4 class="c21"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-mass-nutrition.html">Arnold's Blueprint Trainer: Mass Nutrition Overview</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Quality mass comes from quality calories. Arnold Schwarzenegger knew that fact inside and out. Learn more about how he ate and follow his nutrition blueprint for more mass!</p></div></div><div class="c23" webReader="4.62878787879"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-mass-supplementation.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/arnold-blueprint_supplementation_overview_smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c22" webReader="5.69696969697"><h4 class="c21"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-mass-supplementation.html">Arnold's Blueprint Trainer: Mass Supplementation Overview</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Look under the hood of Arnold Schwarzenegger's signature supplement line! Learn about the products Arnold recommends for incredible results.</p></div></div></div>

15 Things That Made Arnold Schwarzenegger Great

I still remember the first time I walked in the door at Gold’s Gym in 1970. I had been training at Bill Pearl’s gym in Inglewood for most of the past year and seeing great results, but a few of my friends had convinced me to make the switch. I was trying to make my name as a wrestler, not a bodybuilder, but I knew this was the place to build an elite body.

Right away, I saw greats like Dave Draper, Frank Zane, Ken Waller, and Eddie Giuliani training together. Then I saw Arnold. Come to think of it, everyone noticed when he came in the room. He was about 260 pounds, huge, and in great shape. We had met once before, but once I was at Gold’s, we quickly became friends and started doing some chest and back workouts together. We were on the same page with training, and even better, had a similar sense of humor.

Over the next few years, I had a unique window into what drove Arnold during his peak competitive years, as I’ve often discussed on my online show Ric’s Corner. He was able to achieve things that no one else from our community did, and it wasn’t by accident. Here’s what made Arnold—the bodybuilder, the star, and the man—great.

1 He loved to train

Sure, the workouts we did were hard and grueling. But we also knew that training is supposed to be fun, so we made it that way. Arnold trained hard, and there were no secrets to his gains other than pounding out the sets and reps with good heavy weights. Of course we all eventually had injuries to deal with that changed the game, but in the early days, there was nothing more fun than intense, heavy training with classic movements.

2 He used variety—but not too much

Arnold liked to vary the exercises and throw in new movements weekly to change things up, but the sets and reps usually stayed pretty consistent. The Arnold Blueprint trainer is a good representation of the sort of work he did. Nevertheless, he knew that there were some movements that always needed to be a priority. For instance, we would occasionally compete in bench press, primarily because Arnold was so competitive and I always had a slight edge on that lift. My best was 455 pounds, and I think his was around 440.

3 He liked old-fashioned cardio

Today, it seems like nearly everybody in the weight room has built a wall around themselves in the form of a pair of headphones. This is even more the case when it comes to cardio, where you watch TV while you work the treadmill or bike. Talk about solitary confinement! Back in our day, there were none of these machines, and “cardio” was a run on the beach. It was fun, social, and as Arnold has said recently, it was the best way to build a tan that didn’t suck.

4 He relied on proven nutrition principles

When we were training at our peak, supplements were pretty limited. Sure, we had protein at times, but that was about as far as it went, so most of what we built was powered by eating real food—and good food. I’m talking about high protein, high fat, and limited carbs, like nutrition experts are starting to advocate more and more these days. Funny how it all comes around.

“Most of what we built was powered by eating real food—and good food. I’m talking about high protein, high fat, and limited carbs.”

Our hangout was Zucky’s Delicatessen in Santa Monica, and everyone there knew us—especially after Arnold began dating the hostess. Every night we would head over for a cheese omelet, our final helping of protein.

5 He learned from his training

People talk about someone having a “winning personality,” but until they’ve met Arnold, they’ve never really seen it in its purest form. He approached every situation with the expectation that he would get what he wanted, both inside the gym and out.

He trained hard, ate right and saw his future place in a bigger picture. He knew discipline was the key if the end result was going to be good. He paid his dues overcoming a language barrier, becoming a United States citizen, and learning his way in a new country. From the start, the gym was his home base and most comfortable environment. Once he found his way there, he attacked everything else in his life in the same way.

6 His strategic charm

Arnold was a great negotiator and would make deals with companies around the world to use his name as it grew. He’d get supplements, cars, and just about anything else he’d ask for. His charm was the key to his greatness. He could charm anyone out of anything, and people really liked him. I haven’t seen anyone like him since. Bodybuilders today could really learn from this, although it was really just his natural way.

7 His non-strategic charm

“Arnold was very good at getting attention, but he was also attentive to others.”

Arnold had the personality and charisma to attract people, and he loved every minute of it. He was very good at getting attention, but he was also attentive to others, which made everyone feel comfortable around him. Although he was huge and imposing, his personality was the opposite.

My mom, who lived to 97, always told her friends of the time that I brought Arnold over to her house and she made dinner for him, me, and my grandmother. He and my grandmother were from the same city in Austria, and it was quite a fun night where they had a lot to talk about. Both my mother and grandmother remembered that night for as long as they lived, but not just because Arnold was famous. It was because he made time for them, and because he was a fun guy, a great listener, and a natural storyteller.

8 He shared

People sometimes portray Arnold as a kind of egomaniac, but the truth is that he was very generous when it came helping others. He introduced me to Rheo Blair, who at that time was the guru of supplements and famous for his Blair’s Protein, which was the best around and the most expensive. He set me up with Blair to do modeling with product ads in exchange for free supplements. Every month I could load up, and this was due to Arnold. He didn’t have to do this; he simply wanted to help me.

“Rheo Blair Golden-Age Nutrition Guru.”

9 He wasn’t afraid to fail

One day Arnold mentioned that he had a movie audition and asked if I would go with him, since there may be a role for me. I agreed, and later that night we drove up to Burbank. The dialogue was kind of biblical-sounding, complicated, and hard to read. Arnold stumbled over the words, and we both ended up laughing our way through it.

The producers didn’t really care, because they liked Arnold anyway. We got back into the car and Arnold asked what I thought about it. I told him that he sucked and should forget acting altogether. Little did I know who he would become.

10 His persistence

He wouldn’t take no for an answer on any level, and had extreme confidence when asking for something. I took a ride with him out to Joe Weider’s office to collect some money for expenses. When we got there, Arnold asked Joe for a check, and Joe tried to hold him off. Arnold responded by reaching into Joe’s jacket, pulling out the checkbook, and filling out a check. Then he said, “Joe, sign it.” Of course Joe did. Arnold was incredibly persistent when going after something he wanted, and Joe loved Arnold, so it always worked out.

“Arnold wouldn’t take no for an answer on any level, and had extreme confidence when asking for something.”

11 His sense of humor

As countless people can attest, Arnold was great at helping people in the gym, even when he didn’t know them. However, his sense of humor would sometimes get away from him. Once, he took one of the gym members up to the dressing room and had him pose naked, screaming when he’d flex his biceps and growling when going into a most-muscular shot. He also had the guy pose and rub down with motor oil. I’m sure the guy felt pretty stupid afterward, but in the long run, hijinks like these helped make the gym a more fun place for all of us to spend so many long hours.

12 He could multitask

At some point during the years we trained together, Arnold decided acting was the next thing for him. He had a vision of where he could take it, and he studied acting and put his best effort into it. He also began rubbing elbows with the right people, and sure enough, when doors opened for him, his charm took him through those doors to greater things.

“His drive, focus, and discipline were far beyond the average person, and he could apply these attributes wherever and however heneeded in order to achieve his goals.”

But here’s the amazing part: His bodybuilding didn’t suffer at all as a result. He still competed in and won Mr. Olympia while pursuing acting and thriving in numerous other moneymaking projects. His drive, focus, and discipline were far beyond the average person, and he could apply these attributes wherever and however he needed in order to achieve his goals.

13 He was always Arnold

As Arnold’s success in bodybuilding turned into success in films, he began meeting and befriending more and more influential people. At that point, he went off in a different direction from the rest of us at Gold’s Gym, and a different group of people gathered around him. It changed again once he got involved with politics. But Arnold was always Arnold. Every once in a while, he would show up at a memorial for one of our friends, and it was the same old Arnold around us, as just one of the guys.

Every now and then, he still shows up down in Venice on his bike or in his car, and he’s incredibly open and friendly to every kid and fan he meets down there. Just like in the old days, pretty much everyone who crosses paths with him remembers it afterward with a smile.

14 He stuck to his roots

It’s amazing that after all those years and all his accomplishments, Arnold has always kept his love for bodybuilding. At a time when he was a huge movie star, he still found time to write books that explained exactly how to achieve their physical potential. And today he’s still at it, promoting the Arnold Sports Festival in the states and abroad, living the fitness lifestyle and doing what he loves best.

15 He wasn’t afraid to grow

He’s the only person on Earth who has succeeded dramatically in the worlds of bodybuilding, film, and politics. He had one of the best bodies in the world, was one of the largest box office draws in history, and became Governor of California in a landslide victory. None of these things happened by accident. They all took a lot of work and study. No one handed anything to him; he worked hard for all of it. And the prize is that his name, face, and body are recognized around the world.

Recommended For You

Arnold’s Blueprint Trainer: Mass Training Overview

Watch this video to learn some of Arnold Schwarzenegger’s favorite exercises and preferred training techniques for building muscle. Get the knowledge you need to grow!

Arnold’s Blueprint Trainer: Mass Nutrition Overview

Quality mass comes from quality calories. Arnold Schwarzenegger knew that fact inside and out. Learn more about how he ate and follow his nutrition blueprint for more mass!

Arnold’s Blueprint Trainer: Mass Supplementation Overview

Look under the hood of Arnold Schwarzenegger’s signature supplement line! Learn about the products Arnold recommends for incredible results.

See original article:

15 Things That Made Arnold Schwarzenegger Great

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, Personal Fitness Training, Weight TrainingComments Off on 15 Things That Made Arnold Schwarzenegger Great

<div id="DPG" webReader="280.562259402"><p>It's the million-dollar question: How do the fit stay fit?</p><p>At Bodybuilding.com, we're uniquely qualified to know the constellation of factors which separate the successful from the unsuccessful when it comes to fitness. That's because we have <a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/">BodySpace</a>, which is more than just the largest social media site in the world dedicated to the fit-minded. It's also a vast data pool that amounts to the world's largest fitness study, a research effort that we refer to as the Strength in Numbers Study.</p><p>Our Strength in Numbers findings are based on BodySpace members who actively make progress toward their stated goal, whether it's weight gain or loss. If you move toward your goal on BodySpace, we consider that fitness success.</p><div class="c15" webReader="13"><h2 class="article-sub-header c13">WHAT IS STRENGTH IN NUMBERS?</h2><p class="c14">The Strength in Numbers Study is based on data collected from our very own social fitness network, BodySpace. Our findings come from BodySpace members who successfully make progress toward a stated fitness goal, whether it's weight gain or loss. Every time members post to FitBoard or add a picture, they contribute to the study.</p></div><p>Every time you track a workout, post to <a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/fitboard/">FitBoard</a>, add progress pics, and engage in myriad BodySpace activities, you help the community at large. You help us understand the habits that generate fitness success. If you're an active BodySpace member, you contribute to the greater fitness good.</p><p>No matter how many numbers we crunch about crunches, no matter how much digits we slice and dice about getting sliced and diced, shaping up still requires one person to dig deep and make a commitment to become better.</p><div class="cool-fact" webReader="11"><h3>The Power of Progress</h3><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/coolfacts-bluebar.gif" class="c16"/><p>Did you know that BodySpace members altogether lost a total of <strong>1,977,631 pounds</strong> in the last year? The average user also lost<br /><strong>4 percent body fat</strong>. Give yourselves a huge pat on the back<br />for all your tremendous hard work!</p></div><p>New habits must be formed, changes must be made, and reproducible motivation must roar to life. Everyone walks their own path toward their goals, but simple daily habits that reinforce eating better, exercising regularly, and sleeping more still lay the groundwork for a fit life.</p><p>The majority of fit individuals don't spend hours in the gym, live on a diet of cabbage, or nit-pick the optimum amount of holy water to achieve immortality. Instead, fit people share a set of outrageously simple and positivity-reinforcing habits. These are the eight habits of highly successful fit people, according to the first major batch of our Strength in Numbers data.</p><p>
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<h3 class="article-title c17">3 Highly Successful Fit People Post Progress Pictures</h3>
</p><h3 class="article-title c19"></h3><p>You may laugh at the prospect of someone who poses in front of the bathroom mirror, arm outstretched, ready to snap a picture. Maybe you actually know someone who does this, but it turns out there may be something scientifically sound to the "selfie."</p><img src="images/2014/8-habits-of-highly-successful-fit-people-graphics-4.jpg" width="205" height="333" border="0" class="right-image c21"/><p>Progress photos can help you track your progress. Each snapshot in time showcases subtle changes that you might otherwise have never noticed ("Wow, my abs look like they could crush tomatoes here!") and incidentally lights up certain regions in your brain related to euphoria.</p><p>These visual milestones trigger a stronger and stronger release of dopamine, a feel-good brain chemical strongly linked to reward. As you ease the psychological tension between your desire to reach your fitness goal and the hard work needed to achieve it, you will uncover the drive necessary to keep pursuing your goal because you're closer than you were before.</p><p>It might feel a bit awkward at first to take photos of yourself, but these quick snaps can help keep you grounded and motivated.</p><p>When you advance, they allow you to identify weak points or lagging body parts and zero-in on what you need to improve.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c17">4 Highly Successful Fit People Seek and Share Motivation</h3>
</p><h3 class="article-title c19"></h3><p>When you first start your fitness journey, summoning motivation day-in and day-out can be likened to moving a hundred-ton hippo that won't budge an inch no matter how much you goad, hoot, and prod it. Is this genetics or laziness? <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23552494" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Some studies</a> seem to think motivation is inherited, but the literature on motivation itself is <a href="http://her.oxfordjournals.org/content/15/6/695.full" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">still pretty unclear</a>. What <em>is</em> clear, however, is that intrinsic motivation doesn't always come easily, so it has to sprout elsewhere.</p><div class="galleryPhotosContainer"><div class="galleryPhotosRow"><a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/photos/view-user-photo/38589152" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img class="galleryPhotosThumbnail" src="http://imagecdn.bodybuilding.com/img/user_images/growable/2014/02/06/31107422/gallerypic/eRGLUjbDBPTCfkkzpkngBwtqEyiYyZVHXnsng.jpg"/></a><a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/photos/view-user-photo/35652762" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img class="galleryPhotosThumbnail" src="http://imagecdn.bodybuilding.com/img/user_images/growable/2014/01/05/31107422/gallerypic/WdkZCPlmDFmKurfWpkSRYLYCDMWUJGeGtSWfg.jpg"/></a><a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/photos/view-user-photo/36643952" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img class="galleryPhotosThumbnail" src="http://imagecdn.bodybuilding.com/img/user_images/growable/2014/01/15/31107422/gallerypic/RxOJtUuwIAqfssmcggnQlQHHspxgVDKOCtsIg.jpg"/></a><a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/photos/view-user-photo/33908142" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img class="galleryPhotosThumbnail" src="http://imagecdn.bodybuilding.com/img/user_images/growable/2013/11/17/31107422/gallerypic/boamlfKagrSKgcqpMLKeZdNmGuzZqzdZzNmjg.jpg"/></a><a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/photos/view-user-photo/30375611" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img class="galleryPhotosThumbnail" src="http://imagecdn.bodybuilding.com/img/user_images/growable/2013/08/14/31107422/gallerypic/FkTRTVZwBqliEwnsUTDedqglWmpIiUGDMCjwg.jpg"/></a></div><div class="galleryPhotosRow"><a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/photos/view-user-photo/20229352" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img class="galleryPhotosThumbnail" src="http://imagecdn.bodybuilding.com/img/user_images/growable/2013/01/22/31107422/gallerypic/TItGlYfsbUMRFRIdXmAqTeXLuHVuvCWyNtSwg.jpg"/></a><a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/photos/view-user-photo/16359152" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img class="galleryPhotosThumbnail" src="http://imagecdn.bodybuilding.com/img/user_images/growable/2012/10/16/31107422/gallerypic/fDWMFqAkPGddxEAtxLszStSYxxjLYtqKIltug.jpg"/></a><a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/photos/view-user-photo/12706412" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img class="galleryPhotosThumbnail" src="http://imagecdn.bodybuilding.com/img/user_images/growable/2012/07/18/31107422/gallerypic/qDRcgeEOLYZcSKvbrYlnGlPrJhDZuRnxIting.jpg"/></a><a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/photos/view-user-photo/35468792" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img class="galleryPhotosThumbnail" src="http://imagecdn.bodybuilding.com/img/user_images/growable/2014/01/02/31107422/gallerypic/aWGPFEgVLwKyBRAPUOGiJJKgwATaqddYCASeg.jpg"/></a><a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/photos/view-user-photo/36643932" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img class="galleryPhotosThumbnail" src="http://imagecdn.bodybuilding.com/img/user_images/growable/2014/01/15/31107422/gallerypic/gaomLocnkCHXprabuRGSwmjNwretOMxbrscVg.jpg"/></a></div></div><p>Enter the Internet sub-genre of fitness motivational pictures and quotes, aka "fitspiration." Popular quotes range from "A one hour workout is only 4 percent of your day. No excuses!" to "Believe yourself and you are halfway there," to the more abrasive and succinct, "Shut up and train." These powerful quotes and images are staples on <a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/fitboard/">FitBoard</a>, Pinterest, and Tumblr. Just a cursory look through any of these places will hit you with enough extrinsic motivation to kick your arse in gear.</p><p>The best type of motivation, though, is realizing that you enjoy working out and can gain a sense of achievement from doing something awesome. For this reason, tracking your progress through workout logs, pictures, and even occasional medical checkups is incredibly important.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c17">5 Highly Successful Fit People Make Fitness Social</h3>
</p><h3 class="article-title c19"></h3><p>Few things are 100 percent enjoyable when done solo. For instance, the struggle of a 6 a.m. workout is instantly made better with a workout buddy (and a hit of caffeine, of course).</p><p><img src="images/2014/8-habits-of-highly-successful-fit-people-5.jpg" width="560" height="328"/></p><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/fit-people-make-fitness-social_stat-circle.png" class="c23"/><p>Numerous studies reinforce the idea that social support helps create a positive feedback loop to spur on a person's positive self-perception and keep him or her exercising. A study that came out of the Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention shows that social support specific to fitness kept people committed to exercise measurably better than just general support. It's no wonder that fitness conquests are likely more successful among groups which channel the same exercise mindset, like on BodySpace or group fitness classes.</p><p>Interestingly, a study conducted at Kansas State University found that it's better to buddy up with others who are fitter than you are. It sounds like counterintuitive advice, but hanging with someone stronger or fitter is the perfect motivator, because apparently motivation and harder bouts of effort often germinate from "feelings of inadequacy." These feelings can push you toward improvement.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c17">6 Highly Successful Fit People Constantly Learn</h3>
</p><h3 class="article-title c19"></h3><img src="images/2014/8-habits-of-highly-successful-fit-people-graphics-5.jpg" width="311" height="314" border="0" class="right-image c24"/><p>As mentioned before, attaining better fitness at the individual level isn't an exact science—at least not yet. New research on a variety of nutrition and fitness topics hits multiple scientific journals daily, nightly, and ever so quickly. Unless you consume content regularly, it's difficult to keep up with the latest skinny.</p><p>Of course, the Achilles' heel in all this is that such information amounts to the good, the bad, and the ugly.</p><p>You have to apply some critical thinking to separate the chaff from the wheat. Inevitably, you'll come across grand claims with pseudo-scientific backing and a lot plain old-fashioned bro-science, so an active mind and keen eye are essential.</p><p>Don't think you have to try every new program under the sun, either. Rather than implementing everything all at once, save certain tips and techniques for later. Consume quality content regularly, but always examine it through the lens of your own goals, body, and lifestyle.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c17">7 Highly Successful Fit People Regularly Visit Fitness<br /><span class="c25">Sites</span></h3>
</p><h3 class="article-title c19"></h3><p>Through our Strength in Numbers Study, we discovered that the most successfully fit people in the world start off by doing what you're doing right now: Being here and reading this. This habit goes hand-in-hand with Habit No. 6 and proves that you're on the prowl for information, education, and constant self-improvement.</p><p>Being engaged in such activities will help you stay committed to fitness for life. Whether you're looking for information, recipe ideas, or social support, you're in this for the long haul.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c17">8 Highly Successful Fit People Take These Supplements</h3>
</p><h3 class="article-title c19"></h3><div class="left-side-stripe"><ul class="dpg-list"><li class="c26"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/whey.html">Whey Protein</a></li>
<li class="c26"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/amino.html">Amino Acids</a>/<a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/bcaa.html">BCAAs</a></li>
<li class="c26"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/multi.html">Multivitamins</a></li>
<li class="c26"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/creatine-monohydrate.html">Creatine Monohydrate</a></li>
<li class="c26"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/mic.html">Micellar Casein Protein</a></li>
</ul></div><p>Granted, these supplements won't make or break your fitness progress. After all, fitness is based first and foremost on smart training and precision nutrition. To be effective, dietary supplements must stand upon a solid foundation of whole foods and consistent effort. Supplements augment and can enhance your hard work, but they won't do any of that work for you.</p><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/fit-people-take-supplements_stat-circle.png" class="c20"/><p><img src="images/2014/8-habits-of-highly-successful-fit-people-graphics-6.jpg" width="560" height="342"/></p><p>In addition, if often isn't possible to get <em>all</em> the necessary nutrients exclusively from real foods. Some chalk it up to inconvenience—a wholesome meal may just be out of reach simply because of the environment or time constraints. Other times the problem might be more complex and further out of your control. Then there's the growing dearth of nutrients from food itself due to modern agricultural practices, soil depletion, long carbon footprints, and excessive processing.</p><p>The nutrients present in food today aren't in the same concentration as food grown 50 years ago, much less hundreds of years ago. Iceberg lettuce, for example, now has the same nutritional value as cardboard.</p><p>In these instances, supplements—in particular protein—provide the extra nutrients needed to support the fit life of exercising individuals, especially people with specific body composition or strength goals.</p><p>If you want to learn more about the popular supplements and see where they fit in your strategy, you can learn a thing or two from <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bbmainsupp.htm">our supplements page</a> or the category guides linked to the ingredients above.</p><h3 class="article-title">BodySpace, Your Space</h3><p>Are you already a BodySpace member or an active part of another online fitness community? Sound off in the comments below and let us know the habits which work for you. Don't forget to give yourself a hug for beginning or continuing your fitness journey with others like you!</p><a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/2014-bodyspace-banner.jpg"/></a><h5>References</h5><ol class="dpg-list"><li>M. D. Roberts et al. Phenotypic and Molecular Differences Between Rats Selectively-Bred to Voluntarily Run High Versus Low Nightly Distances. AJP: Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 2013; DOI:10.1152/ajpregu.00581.2012</li>
<li>Oka, RK et al. Sources of social support as predictors of exercise adherence in women and men ages 50 to 65 years. Women's Health. 1995 Summer;1(2):161-175</li>
<li>National Institute of Mental Health. "Brain signal boosts as monkey nears reward." NIMH. NIMH, 30 May, 2002.</li>
<li>4. Kansas State University. "Burning more calories is easier when working out with someone you perceive as better." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 November 2012.</li>
<li>Mark W. Howe et al. Prolonged dopamine signalling in striatum signals proximity and value of distant rewards. Nature, 2013; DOI: 10.1038</li>
<li>Fan MS et al. Evidence of decreasing mineral density in wheat grain over the last 160 years. Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology. 2008;22(4):315-324</li>
</ol><br /><h3 class="article-title">Recommended For You</h3><div class="c29" webReader="6.1875"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/muscle-manifesto-5-principles-of-the-lifting-life.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/5-principles-of-the-lifting-life-twinlab-smallbox2.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c28" webReader="8.25"><h4 class="c27"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/muscle-manifesto-5-principles-of-the-lifting-life.html">5 Principles Of Lifting Life</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
A personal record is great, but it's just a number. Strengthen your life from the bottom up, and your lifts will grow alongside it!</p></div></div><div class="c29" webReader="5.37209302326"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/learn-olympic-lifts-snatch-and-clean-and-jerk-progression-lifts.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/olympic-pregression-lifts-smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c28" webReader="6.90697674419"><h4 class="c27"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/learn-olympic-lifts-snatch-and-clean-and-jerk-progression-lifts.html">How To Master Olympic Lifts You Think You Can't Do</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
The snatch and the clean and jerk are difficult movements-but highly effective. So before you load a barbell and try one of them, give these progression lifts a go.</p></div></div><div class="c29" webReader="5.02475247525"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/fitness-360-samantha-ann-leete-leetes-fitness-feats.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/sam-leete-fit-360-main-smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c28" webReader="6.4603960396"><h4 class="c27"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/fitness-360-samantha-ann-leete-leetes-fitness-feats.html">Full Plan Shows You How To Look Like A Spokesmodel Winner</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Samantha Ann Leete was the perfect choice to win the 2013 BodySpace spokesmodel contest. To see how she won, check out her full plan right here!</p></div></div><br class="c30"/></div>

Strength In Numbers: The 8 Habits Of Highly Successful Fit People

It’s the million-dollar question: How do the fit stay fit?

At Bodybuilding.com, we’re uniquely qualified to know the constellation of factors which separate the successful from the unsuccessful when it comes to fitness. That’s because we have BodySpace, which is more than just the largest social media site in the world dedicated to the fit-minded. It’s also a vast data pool that amounts to the world’s largest fitness study, a research effort that we refer to as the Strength in Numbers Study.

Our Strength in Numbers findings are based on BodySpace members who actively make progress toward their stated goal, whether it’s weight gain or loss. If you move toward your goal on BodySpace, we consider that fitness success.

WHAT IS STRENGTH IN NUMBERS?

The Strength in Numbers Study is based on data collected from our very own social fitness network, BodySpace. Our findings come from BodySpace members who successfully make progress toward a stated fitness goal, whether it’s weight gain or loss. Every time members post to FitBoard or add a picture, they contribute to the study.

Every time you track a workout, post to FitBoard, add progress pics, and engage in myriad BodySpace activities, you help the community at large. You help us understand the habits that generate fitness success. If you’re an active BodySpace member, you contribute to the greater fitness good.

No matter how many numbers we crunch about crunches, no matter how much digits we slice and dice about getting sliced and diced, shaping up still requires one person to dig deep and make a commitment to become better.

The Power of Progress

Did you know that BodySpace members altogether lost a total of 1,977,631 pounds in the last year? The average user also lost
4 percent body fat. Give yourselves a huge pat on the back
for all your tremendous hard work!

New habits must be formed, changes must be made, and reproducible motivation must roar to life. Everyone walks their own path toward their goals, but simple daily habits that reinforce eating better, exercising regularly, and sleeping more still lay the groundwork for a fit life.

The majority of fit individuals don’t spend hours in the gym, live on a diet of cabbage, or nit-pick the optimum amount of holy water to achieve immortality. Instead, fit people share a set of outrageously simple and positivity-reinforcing habits. These are the eight habits of highly successful fit people, according to the first major batch of our Strength in Numbers data.

1 Highly Successful Fit People Track Their Workouts

Memory sure works in a funny way. If you’ve been relying on it to recollect the exact number of reps and the weight for each of the five (or was it six?) exercises you did two Tuesdays ago, the only exercise you’ll be doing at the gym is frustrating yourself.

It’s more than merely a matter of organization. Neglecting to track your workout via an online tool or a journal is a rookie mistake, one that can lead to unproductive workouts and a stark absence of recognizable progress. Simply writing down your workouts makes you more aware of what you may or may not be doing. You might be surprised to learn that you were, in fact, doing only 20 minutes of cardio rather than 30.

Additionally, a visual record—especially one that other people can view—holds you accountable to completing your workout, gets you fired up about measurable progress, helps you avoid exercise plateaus, and could even engage you in some friendly competition among peers.

All of these serve to help the fit stay fit—or in some cases, get even fitter.

2 Highly Successful Fit People Find a Plan And Stick It Out

There are literally hundreds of exercise plans out in the wild. It’s not uncommon for a newcomer to struggle with finding the “perfect” exercise blueprint. When it comes to picking out a suitable workout program, the best method is to just go with one that fits your goal and difficulty level, and then feel out the program for at least six weeks. Why?

If you’re new to exercise, your body undergoes major changes as it attempts to wire your motor units and brain to become better accustomed to new movement patterns. Typically, it takes 4-6 weeks for your body to adapt and for beastly gains to come out of hibernation.

It is for this reason that both sticking it out the first six weeks of the program and tracking your workout—the first habit we discussed (see the synergy?)—are so crucial. In doing so, you can make smart tweaks to turbocharge your program and view progress in numbers, even if they don’t immediately make themselves apparent on your body.

Once you get over that initial adaptation phase, the transformation begins to take shape, making you more likely to dive further into the program. This brings us to the next point …

3 Highly Successful Fit People Post Progress Pictures

You may laugh at the prospect of someone who poses in front of the bathroom mirror, arm outstretched, ready to snap a picture. Maybe you actually know someone who does this, but it turns out there may be something scientifically sound to the “selfie.”

Progress photos can help you track your progress. Each snapshot in time showcases subtle changes that you might otherwise have never noticed (“Wow, my abs look like they could crush tomatoes here!”) and incidentally lights up certain regions in your brain related to euphoria.

These visual milestones trigger a stronger and stronger release of dopamine, a feel-good brain chemical strongly linked to reward. As you ease the psychological tension between your desire to reach your fitness goal and the hard work needed to achieve it, you will uncover the drive necessary to keep pursuing your goal because you’re closer than you were before.

It might feel a bit awkward at first to take photos of yourself, but these quick snaps can help keep you grounded and motivated.

When you advance, they allow you to identify weak points or lagging body parts and zero-in on what you need to improve.

4 Highly Successful Fit People Seek and Share Motivation

When you first start your fitness journey, summoning motivation day-in and day-out can be likened to moving a hundred-ton hippo that won’t budge an inch no matter how much you goad, hoot, and prod it. Is this genetics or laziness? Some studies seem to think motivation is inherited, but the literature on motivation itself is still pretty unclear. What is clear, however, is that intrinsic motivation doesn’t always come easily, so it has to sprout elsewhere.

Enter the Internet sub-genre of fitness motivational pictures and quotes, aka “fitspiration.” Popular quotes range from “A one hour workout is only 4 percent of your day. No excuses!” to “Believe yourself and you are halfway there,” to the more abrasive and succinct, “Shut up and train.” These powerful quotes and images are staples on FitBoard, Pinterest, and Tumblr. Just a cursory look through any of these places will hit you with enough extrinsic motivation to kick your arse in gear.

The best type of motivation, though, is realizing that you enjoy working out and can gain a sense of achievement from doing something awesome. For this reason, tracking your progress through workout logs, pictures, and even occasional medical checkups is incredibly important.

5 Highly Successful Fit People Make Fitness Social

Few things are 100 percent enjoyable when done solo. For instance, the struggle of a 6 a.m. workout is instantly made better with a workout buddy (and a hit of caffeine, of course).

Numerous studies reinforce the idea that social support helps create a positive feedback loop to spur on a person’s positive self-perception and keep him or her exercising. A study that came out of the Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention shows that social support specific to fitness kept people committed to exercise measurably better than just general support. It’s no wonder that fitness conquests are likely more successful among groups which channel the same exercise mindset, like on BodySpace or group fitness classes.

Interestingly, a study conducted at Kansas State University found that it’s better to buddy up with others who are fitter than you are. It sounds like counterintuitive advice, but hanging with someone stronger or fitter is the perfect motivator, because apparently motivation and harder bouts of effort often germinate from “feelings of inadequacy.” These feelings can push you toward improvement.

6 Highly Successful Fit People Constantly Learn

As mentioned before, attaining better fitness at the individual level isn’t an exact science—at least not yet. New research on a variety of nutrition and fitness topics hits multiple scientific journals daily, nightly, and ever so quickly. Unless you consume content regularly, it’s difficult to keep up with the latest skinny.

Of course, the Achilles’ heel in all this is that such information amounts to the good, the bad, and the ugly.

You have to apply some critical thinking to separate the chaff from the wheat. Inevitably, you’ll come across grand claims with pseudo-scientific backing and a lot plain old-fashioned bro-science, so an active mind and keen eye are essential.

Don’t think you have to try every new program under the sun, either. Rather than implementing everything all at once, save certain tips and techniques for later. Consume quality content regularly, but always examine it through the lens of your own goals, body, and lifestyle.

7 Highly Successful Fit People Regularly Visit Fitness
Sites

Through our Strength in Numbers Study, we discovered that the most successfully fit people in the world start off by doing what you’re doing right now: Being here and reading this. This habit goes hand-in-hand with Habit No. 6 and proves that you’re on the prowl for information, education, and constant self-improvement.

Being engaged in such activities will help you stay committed to fitness for life. Whether you’re looking for information, recipe ideas, or social support, you’re in this for the long haul.

8 Highly Successful Fit People Take These Supplements

Granted, these supplements won’t make or break your fitness progress. After all, fitness is based first and foremost on smart training and precision nutrition. To be effective, dietary supplements must stand upon a solid foundation of whole foods and consistent effort. Supplements augment and can enhance your hard work, but they won’t do any of that work for you.

In addition, if often isn’t possible to get all the necessary nutrients exclusively from real foods. Some chalk it up to inconvenience—a wholesome meal may just be out of reach simply because of the environment or time constraints. Other times the problem might be more complex and further out of your control. Then there’s the growing dearth of nutrients from food itself due to modern agricultural practices, soil depletion, long carbon footprints, and excessive processing.

The nutrients present in food today aren’t in the same concentration as food grown 50 years ago, much less hundreds of years ago. Iceberg lettuce, for example, now has the same nutritional value as cardboard.

In these instances, supplements—in particular protein—provide the extra nutrients needed to support the fit life of exercising individuals, especially people with specific body composition or strength goals.

If you want to learn more about the popular supplements and see where they fit in your strategy, you can learn a thing or two from our supplements page or the category guides linked to the ingredients above.

BodySpace, Your Space

Are you already a BodySpace member or an active part of another online fitness community? Sound off in the comments below and let us know the habits which work for you. Don’t forget to give yourself a hug for beginning or continuing your fitness journey with others like you!

References
  1. M. D. Roberts et al. Phenotypic and Molecular Differences Between Rats Selectively-Bred to Voluntarily Run High Versus Low Nightly Distances. AJP: Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 2013; DOI:10.1152/ajpregu.00581.2012
  2. Oka, RK et al. Sources of social support as predictors of exercise adherence in women and men ages 50 to 65 years. Women’s Health. 1995 Summer;1(2):161-175
  3. National Institute of Mental Health. “Brain signal boosts as monkey nears reward.” NIMH. NIMH, 30 May, 2002.
  4. 4. Kansas State University. “Burning more calories is easier when working out with someone you perceive as better.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 November 2012.
  5. Mark W. Howe et al. Prolonged dopamine signalling in striatum signals proximity and value of distant rewards. Nature, 2013; DOI: 10.1038
  6. Fan MS et al. Evidence of decreasing mineral density in wheat grain over the last 160 years. Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology. 2008;22(4):315-324

Recommended For You

5 Principles Of Lifting Life

A personal record is great, but it’s just a number. Strengthen your life from the bottom up, and your lifts will grow alongside it!

How To Master Olympic Lifts You Think You Can’t Do

The snatch and the clean and jerk are difficult movements-but highly effective. So before you load a barbell and try one of them, give these progression lifts a go.

Full Plan Shows You How To Look Like A Spokesmodel Winner

Samantha Ann Leete was the perfect choice to win the 2013 BodySpace spokesmodel contest. To see how she won, check out her full plan right here!


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Strength In Numbers: The 8 Habits Of Highly Successful Fit People

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