Tag Archive | "program"

Fitness Tips-Make fitness a hobby

It is rare for me to make a blanket statement when describing my clients. Although many share similar goals, all of them come from different walks of life and encounter unique challenges. However, one thing that I can say every single one of my clients has struggled with is consistency.

It seems that everyone has a story to share about a time when they “were doing awesome,” or “felt amazing.” For every positive memory there is the corresponding down-swing that played out that they are less fond of recounting. I see it as my task as a coach to help my clients appreciate the power of carefully positioning their relationship with their fitness program so that it remains enjoyable and thus they stick with it.

Have you ever considered visualizing physical fitness and clean eating/dieting as a hobby? For many the answer is no. The funny thing is that people are far more likely to participate in something that they enjoy versus something that they don’t. Specialized hobbies such as weight training, running, and nutrition, for example, require a lot of work, but as with many hobbies you will become more and more proficient with time.

When a client begins my program I often explain to them that, like most hobbies, they won’t be great from the start. I explain that like any discipline they will get better with practice and learn to appreciate each and every meal/snack and workout more and more as they have time to discover their potential. Before long my clients are able to see that their relationship with clean eating and working out has moved from something that they “have to do” to something that they are “happy to do.”

Work, on the other hand, is often dull and rarely becomes more enjoyable as you get better at it. Work is something that we often try to avoid. It doesn’t take much to find a rational distraction that we can use to get away from it. Examples of excuses that I hear all of the time include: “I don’t have the time,” or “I can’t work out at night, that’s the only time that I have to see my husband,” or “work was hard today, I will go to the gym tomorrow.”

I don’t mean to sound negative here, but I can’t express just how many times I have seen a potential client fail to realize how much they are missing out on by skipping workouts and eating poorly. As I mentioned before hobbies are enjoyable. People don’t search for excuses to rationalize getting out of a fishing trip, a shopping spree at the crafts store, or going to a Pats game. Yes, skipping your workouts and failing to plan and/or prepare meals for the week may free up several hours, but at what cost?

Workouts and clean eating reduce stress and boost virtually every aspect of your being from your health to your attitude; they are hobbies that act as life-enhancers. By making a seemingly subtle mental adjustment from “I have to exercise and eat right,” to “I am going to make a hobby out of exercising and eating right,” you may notice yourself making less excuses and possibly, just possibly, start to enjoy them as your favorite and most essential hobbies.

Coach Chris McHugh is the fitness coach and manager at Get In Shape For Women in Westwood. Please send questions, suggestions, or topic ideas to ChrismcHugh@getinshapeforwomen.com.

 

Link:

Fitness Tips-Make fitness a hobby

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Personal Fitness Training, Weight loss, Weight TrainingComments Off on Fitness Tips-Make fitness a hobby

Thumbnail

Ryan Hughes’ Power Pecs Chest Workout

 

Back when I only had 135 pounds on my 6-foot-1 frame, I had to deal with the usual labels: ectomorph, hardgainer, skinny kid. I didn’t care for those words then, and I don’t like them any better now.

I used weights to change my physique. I love to train heavy, I love to move quickly, and I love the pump I get from high volume. I put all three of these elements into each workout I do, and I couldn’t ask for better results.

Today’s chest workout is no different. It combines a fast pace to keep your heart rate up, high volume for an insane pump, and heavy weights to make you stronger.

When you put each of these pieces together, you end up with a max-effort workout that will challenge all aspects of your fitness level.

Let’s get it done!

Power Pecs
Watch The Video – 11:11

One of the toughest aspects of this workout is the mental game. Your body will always have that extra rep, or that extra set, but you have to find the mental energy to get it done. I may not be the biggest or strongest guy in the gym, but I guarantee no one can outwork me.

If you’ve never done this type of training before, you might find it difficult. If you fail, put the weight down and give yourself a little break before you finish the set. You want the shortest rest periods possible, but do whatever you need to get the work done. Never give up on a set.

A lot of guys tell me that they want to build the best physique ever. I think that’s the wrong approach. Don’t focus on being the best ever, focus on building your best physique ever.

Max out what you can do. If you constantly compare yourself to everyone else, you’ll sell yourself short. Hit this workout with all you’ve got and reap the personal rewards.

Program Notes

Incline dumbbell press

I like to do a couple warm-up sets before starting the first heavy set. Don’t go too heavy on the warm-up because you’ll wear yourself out. Eighty total reps is a lot of reps, so you have to keep an eye on muscular endurance. This is a chest marathon.

I start with 75-pound dumbbells for the first warm-up set and then go up to 85 pounds for the second. When I start my working sets, I go up to 100 pounds. Don’t worry about what I’m doing, though. Pick a weight that’s challenging for you.

This style of training is mentally draining. Dig deep and do your best on those last couple sets. If you need to rest-pause to hit the total rep count, do it, but make sure you finish every single rep.

Hammer strength chest press

You can do these with whatever grip you prefer. Challenge yourself with the weight and then increase it every set. You might feel like you’ll never get those target reps, but trust me—I’ve been doing this long enough. One way or another, the reps will come.

Hammer Strength Chest Press

 

Reverse-grip barbell bench press

Use lighter weight for this exercise and focus on the contraction—squeeze on each and every rep. You want to push until you can’t go anymore. Crush the barbell with your grip and engage your mind-muscle connection.

If you fail on this exercise, don’t panic. Let the weight briefly sit on your chest, reverse your grip back to normal, and press the bar back up.

Pec deck

Make sure you don’t round your shoulders forward: Keep your chest high and maintain a good arch in your lower back. Focus entirely on the chest and squeeze.

Pec Deck

 

Incline dumbbell flye

Get as much as you can out of this exercise. Stretch nice and wide at the bottom of each rep, and squeeze at the top for a full contraction. Don’t go too heavy or you’ll round your shoulders forward. Keep the tension entirely on your upper chest.

High cable flyes

We’re doing 100 total reps, so do as many reps as you can per set and as many sets as you need to get to 100 reps. I usually do four sets of 25 reps.

High Cable Flyes

At the end of the workout, you’ll be exhausted. You may want to give up and walk out. But at the end of the day, you always have those extra reps and extra sets in you. Leave them in the gym.

Recommended For You

Ask The Pro Trainer: Is It Possible To Build Muscle While Burning Fat?

I’m a celebrity and VIP trainer, IFBB Men’s Physique Pro, and fitness advocate. I’d like to help you reach your goals by answering your tough questions. Let’s get fit!

3 Rules For Effective Sandbag Training

Training with sandbags is catching on among a wide range of athletes. If you want strength and explosive power to help you rise to any challenge, step up to the bag!

Boost Your Bench Press, Squat, And Deadlift!

Mastering the three basic lifts is essential for building an awesome body. Learning these variations can turn awesome to amazing.

 

About The Author

Ryan Hughes was one of the first men to qualify as an IFBB Physique Pro. He works as a personal trainer and fitness model in New York City

View original article:

Ryan Hughes’ Power Pecs Chest Workout

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, Uncategorized, Warm upComments Off on Ryan Hughes’ Power Pecs Chest Workout

Thumbnail

Train With Dana Linn Bailey Contest: Winning Back Workout

Sam Wells is one lucky girl. The aspiring women’s physique competitor not only met the first-ever women’s physique Olympia winner, Dana Linn Bailey, she trained with her too. Sam won MHP’s 2013 “Train With Dana” contest, and her prize was spending the day at City Athletic Club in Las Vegas trading reps with her idol.

“When I got the call that I had won, I honestly didn’t know what to do—I just ran around the house crying like a total spaz,” recalls Sam. The day after DLB won the Olympia, Sam was there to meet her. Among flashing cameras and surprise visits from other notable Olympia athletes, such as Kai Greene, the two women got right down to business by crushing a back workout. “Getting to do what I love to do most alongside the person I most look up to was a remarkable experience,” says Sam.

Train With Dana
Watch The Video – 11:09

Although she was depleted and tired from the day before, DLB challenged Sam to do her best. “The thing about Dana is that she is so inspiring,” says Sam. “She makes you feel like you can do it too. There are some people who are discouraging and have a cocky attitude. She’s not like that at all. She’s really uplifting, inspiring, and motivating.”

“I was speechless the whole day—I just tried to take it all in. This day changed my life.”

Follow the workout these two inspiring ladies did together!

Recommended For You

Delt Homicide: Dana Linn Bailey Shoulders Workout

There are shoulders, and then there are DLB shoulders. You want a pair of your own? Here’s the workout that can help you build them! See if you can keep up.

BodySpace Member Of The Month: Dana Linn Bailey

We admire anyone who puts in the effort to get on stage and compete, but please give us muscle! Dana splices attitude and amplitude.

23 Boosts To Workout Intensity

We all need a little kick to the behind once in a while. Here are 23 ways to increase the fun and intensity of your workouts so you feel more motivated to do them!


Related Articles

About The Author

Check out these awesome articles by some of the best writers in the industry.

RATE THIS ARTICLE

POOR

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10

EXCELLENT

OVERALL RATING

N/A

Out of 10

0 Ratings

SUCCESS:

  • Your comment has been posted! Because comments are displayed from oldest to newest, it will appear on the last page.

ERROR:

  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Integer mattis varius nisi eu aliquet. Integer mattis.
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet
Showing 0 – of Comments

(5 characters minimum)

    • notify me when users reply to my comment
Showing 0 – of Comments

Featured Product

Originally posted here:  

Train With Dana Linn Bailey Contest: Winning Back Workout

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, Uncategorized, Warm upComments Off on Train With Dana Linn Bailey Contest: Winning Back Workout

Thumbnail

Built Like A Gymnast: Pack On The Muscle With Gymnastic Rings

Gymnastics rings are showing up in more gyms than ever before. However, many people mistakenly believe these wooden implements are only useful for athletes who use them in competition, like gymnasts or CrossFit athletes. In reality, anyone can use the rings and benefit from them tremendously, because they help simultaneously build strength, stability, and coordination like no other apparatus.

If you’ve ever watched the gymnastics events at the Olympics, you know how much strength the rings require. What you may not know about the rings, though, is how effectively they can be used to build incredible muscular size and definition. The rings may not be the first tool that comes to mind if hypertrophy is your goal, but as the incredible physiques of elite gymnasts show, ring work can help pack muscle on the upper body.

Are they easy? No, but nothing worth pursuing is. If you’re willing to start at the bottom and master the techniques and routines I outline here, you’ll find they’re a great tool for building a muscular upper body that’s every bit as strong as it looks.

Gymnastics Rings for Hypertrophy
Watch The Video – 05:50

Getting Off The Ground

The primary exercises that I’ll show you are leverage holds and fundamental pulls and pushes that emphasize control over the rings and your body.

For now, you won’t be doing any swinging moves on the rings. Instead, the primary exercises that I’ll show you are leverage holds and fundamental pulls and pushes that emphasize control over the rings and your body. You’ll soon realize that these are the best for hypertrophy and muscle conditioning anyway.

Most of these moves are classics with which you’re familiar, but not like this. Why would you need to watch another tutorial on doing a pull-up, row, or dip? The answer: Because everything is different on the rings.

It makes perfect sense when you think about it. If you do a bodyweight pull-up on a stable object like a bar, the only moving object is your body. All you have to worry about is pulling your body to reach the bar.

With the rings, you can’t rely on the stability of a bar; you have to stabilize the rings while also pulling your body up to meet them. This requires more control, tension, concentration, and effort.

You can’t just jump on the rings and let your mind wander as you pump out the reps. This in itself is a major benefit to using them. As any experienced bodybuilder will attest, the mind-muscle connection is both real and highly effective at changing your physique, and it is front and center in ring training.

Right away, you’ll notice improved muscular contraction and sensation, and even if you’ve been training for a while. This “new” style of training can also produce DOMS like you haven’t felt since the first time you picked up a weight!

Gymnastics Rings Workouts

These two routines will help familiarize you with the unique challenges and stimulus offered by the rings, and they’re great for building that coveted V-shape. If you can’t manage all the reps at first, don’t be surprised. Keep practicing until you can manage all the reps with good form and a full range of motion on pull-ups and dips before trying anything more advanced.

Keep practicing until you can manage all the reps with good form and a full range of motion on pull-ups and dips before trying anything more advanced.

Start with the fundamentals workout, and when you’re feeling confident with it, mix in the superset workout.

Ring Fundamentals Workout
  1. Top position hold 5 sets of 15 seconds, 30 sec. rest
  2. Ring dip 5 sets of 8-12 reps, 1 min. rest
  3. Reverse row sit-back 5 sets of 10-15 reps, 1 min. rest
  4. Tuck/L-sit 5 sets of 15 seconds, 30 sec. rest
  5. Ring chin-up or pull-up 5 sets of 8-12 reps, 1 min. rest

Dynamic/Isometric Superset workout
  1. Ring dip 6-8 reps of dip, with a 15-sec. top position hold in between each rep. Do this for 5 sets with 1 min. rest between sets.
  2. Reverse row sit-back 6 to 8 reps with a 15-sec. tuck/L-sit in between each rep. Do this for 5 sets with 1 minute of rest between sets.
  3. Ring chin-up or pull-up 5 sets of 8 to 12 reps, with 1 minute of rest between sets.

Why These Exercises?

Exercise 1

Holding this position correctly will give you an intense triceps involvement, along with a contraction of the posterior deltoid and mid and lower trapezius. It’s a great move to start your routine; it “wakes up” the upper body and core and prepares them for the work ahead.

Exercise 2

Ring Dip

This classic bodyweight exercise is made exponentially harder by the unstable rings, so don’t be alarmed if you can’t do as many repetitions as you normally would on a fixed object. Again, be prepared for significant triceps contraction and pectoral involvement, especially if you pause for a second in the bottom position of the rep.

When fatigue hits, you’ll notice the last few inches of the repetition seem impossible to complete. Keep pushing hard! This is where the benefit happens.

Exercise 3

Reverse Row Sit-Back

This unique combination move joins together a rowing movement with a pull-up and assists in that transitional strength between the two moves. It stimulates development in the lats, biceps, and shoulders.

It’s not unusual to see a jump in performance on your regular rows and pull-ups after performing this exercise on the rings regularly for just a few weeks.

Exercise 4

This leverage hold takes abdominal training to the next level. Just as in the top position hold, your arms and shoulders will be working as hard as possible. But the added positioning of having your knees or entire leg lifted up makes it even more difficult.

Be prepared to hold for less time and do more sets in the beginning to get used to doing these moves on the rings.

Exercise 5

The lats, rhomboids, deltoids, biceps, abdominals, forearms, and even the pecs get worked hard in the ring version of the mighty pull-up. The moving rings make it more difficult, but they can also be a lifesaver for people who experience elbow or shoulder problems when doing pull-ups on a straight bar.

The free rotation of the rings lets you change your positioning in a way that you can’t on a fixed bar, and this often helps alleviate the strain that may be giving you problems.

Practice, Practice, Practice

There is one important thing to keep in mind if you’re looking to incorporate rings into your training regimen: They require patience and dedication. One of the most common things we hear from our clients is how humbling they found ring training to be initially. You may be strong, but you’ll be required to use your body in a different way than you’re used to.

I recommend choosing one of the routines described above and sticking with it for at least 4-6 weeks exclusively. This will give you the chance to get acclimated with this new training style. Don’t worry about losing ground in your other upper body lifts; if anything, you might find they’re stronger when you go back to them.

After you feel a bit more comfortable using the rings, incorporate rings exercises into your regular training as you see fit.

Recommended For You

Bodyweight Bust! Four Bodyweight Training Myths Debunked

Don’t believe that high-level calisthenics are only for athletes who look a certain way. Everyone can benefit from the unique challenges that come with bodyweight training!

6 Tricks For A Stronger Squat!

Looking to turn the heat up on your squat regimen? You’ve come to the right place. Step away from the norm and address the weaknesses that hold you back!

Learn The Olympic Lifts: Snatch And Clean And Jerk Progression Lifts

The snatch and the clean and jerk are difficult movements. So before you load a barbell and try one of them, give these progression lifts a go. They’ll help you develop the speed, mobility, and power to be successful.


About The Author

Ryan Hurst is the Program Director for Gold Medal Bodies, with over 20 years of experience in strength and movement coaching.

Link:

Built Like A Gymnast: Pack On The Muscle With Gymnastic Rings

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, Uncategorized, Weight TrainingComments Off on Built Like A Gymnast: Pack On The Muscle With Gymnastic Rings

Thumbnail

Physique Workout: NPC Athlete Nic Troupe's Fitness Regimen

NPC Men’s Physique competitor Nic Troupe has a history many of us can relate to. After an injury forced him to retire from his college football team, Nic was a little lost. But, unlike many ex-collegiate athletes, he didn’t spend his extra time feeling sorry for himself. Instead, Nic dove into the academic side of athletics and found his way into a lifetime of fitness, which eventually led him into competition. Check out Nic’s story and get his full fitness program!

Nic grabbed an undergraduate degree in fitness management, which led him to Wartburg College and Northern Iowa University, where he worked on the strength staff as a graduate assistant. “I got really involved in athletic training, and coaching strength and conditioning,” Nic says.

With an M.A. in physical education and a CSCS certification in hand, Nic then spent six years as a strength coach at a high school. Nic took pride in helping young athletes better themselves, but he also wanted to improve his own fitness. “I’ve trained for 5k and 10k road races and warrior dashes, and I’ve done competitive bench press competitions,” says Nic.

“I may make the switch to bodybuilding in the future, but we will have to wait and see.”

Clearly an athlete, Nic’s latest challenge has been competing in physique. He placed 2nd at the 2012 NPC Denver Novice and Masters Championships, and 4th as a novice at the Max Muscle Mile High Natural Championships.

His competitive future was looking bright when calamity struck. As he and his fiancee were waking across the street, they were hit by a taxi. Nic suffered severe neuromuscular damage which inhibited his speech and made even basic movements like walking up and down stairs very painful. His physical issues lasted for three months, and he had to back out of a show 8 weeks before he was scheduled to compete.

Undaunted by his setback, Nic recovered and continued to compete. In 2013, he placed 9th in the open division of the Colorado State Championships. For his future fitness endeavors, Nic is prepared to bring his best-ever self to the stage. “I may make the switch to bodybuilding in the future, but we will have to wait and see,” he says.

Nic’s Nutrition Program

Nic’s nutrition philosophy is based upon the “If It Fits Your Macros” approach. His greatest success has come from not over-complicating his diet. He focuses on eating healthy foods every day, but doesn’t deprive himself, especially during the off season. “If I want to have a Pop-Tart, I’ll have one,” says Nic. “I know that my approach doesn’t look like all of the other guys, but it works for me and I am happy with the results I get.”

Using this approach, Nic has been able to stay leaner in the off season without losing any muscle mass.

As stage day draws nearer, the indulgences are far less frequent. Other than cutting some indulgences near a competition, Nic’s diet stays pretty much the same in and out of season.

Blend Together

Nic’s Training Program

The guiding principle behind Nic’s training program is constant change. He rarely does the same workouts twice, so his body never knows what’s coming and he stays excited about his training.

When aiming to build mass in the off-season, Nic does heavy lifts in straight sets. As contest season nears, he changes his regimen to include more supersets, trisets, and dropsets to keep his heart rate up and burn more fat.

Below is a sample training week that Nic might follow. After doing this workout routine, he may not repeat the same sessions for another 4 or 5 weeks. All rest periods are kept to around 60 seconds, with the exception of legs and shoulders, which is taken to 90 seconds rest between sets.

“As contest season nears, he changes his regimen to include more supersets, trisets, and dropsets to keep his heart rate up and burn more fat.”

Superset
Superset

Nic’s Supplement Program

When selecting a supplement to use, Nic looks for two primary factors: cost and taste.

Because of his previous results and enthusiasm for iSatori, when he reached out to iSatori, he was quickly invited to become a brand rep on the Bodybuilding.com forums, and now he gets all the great-tasting supplements he enjoys.

His stack isn’t huge, though. “I base my diet on lean gains rather than going for an all-out ‘dirty bulk,’ so I don’t need much beyond my diet and training,” says Nic. “I’m really liking how Bio-Gro is helping me with adding lean mass without additional calories.”


Recommended For You

7 Traits Of Successful Physical Transformations

Success, they say, leaves behind clues. If you want to make this year the year you finally get it right, learn from people who have achieved life-altering transformations before you!

Good Morning Protein: The Meat And Nuts Breakfast

Your day is too important to be fueled with kids’ stuff, cheap carbs, or worse yet, nothing at all. Try the breakfast that elite athletes rave about: a serving of meat and a handful of nuts!

Press On: 3 Fixes To Boost Your Bench Press!

Don’t suffer helplessly under the weight of the bar. Learn the bench press basics and inject new life into one of the most popular lifts known to mankind!

About The Author

I’ve been working in the field of exercise science for the last 8 years. I’ve written a number of online and print articles.

Link: 

Physique Workout: NPC Athlete Nic Troupe's Fitness Regimen

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, UncategorizedComments Off on Physique Workout: NPC Athlete Nic Troupe's Fitness Regimen

Jogging-Treadmill

Erin Stern Elite Body 4 Week Daily Fitness Trainer Day 22

Previous | Main | Next

It’s the last week of Elite Body—that means you only have seven more days to make big changes in your body! This week, train with more intensity and focus than you have in the past three weeks.

Your goal for today should be to start off the week on the right foot. How you train and feel today can impact how you train and feel for the rest of the week. Get your mindset figured out now so you aren’t wasting time doing uninspired workouts. Let’s get going!

Elite Body Meal Plan

Check out the table below to see what Erin eats on a daily basis. You don’t have to follow these meals exactly, but take some cues from Erin’s template: Eat 5-6 times per day, eat protein at every meal, stick to complex carbs, don’t skimp on healthy fats, and taper your carbohydrate intake as the day goes on. Follow these rules to build your own elite meal plan.

Because each of us has particular caloric and macronutrient needs, feel free to add or subtract calories, increase the protein, and make other adjustments. Be smart about your choices, stick to the same food categories, and try to adhere to the schedule. What you eat is just as important as what you do in the gym, if not more. There are a lot of healthy options in these example meals, so you shouldn’t ever feel deprived or hungry.

Elite Strength Stack

Support strength, growth,
and recovery with this protein, bcaa, and pre-workout combo!*

“Day & Night” Protein Stack

Support muscle growth and recovery with this whey,
casein, and ZMA combo!*

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Previous | Main | Next


Related Articles

About The Author

Check out these awesome articles by some of the best writers in the industry.

RATE THIS ARTICLE

POOR

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10

EXCELLENT

OVERALL RATING

N/A

Out of 10

0 Ratings

SUCCESS:

  • Your comment has been posted! Because comments are displayed from oldest to newest, it will appear on the last page.

ERROR:

  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Integer mattis varius nisi eu aliquet. Integer mattis.
  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet
Showing 0 – of Comments

(5 characters minimum)

    • notify me when users reply to my comment
Showing 0 – of Comments

Featured Product

This article – 

Erin Stern Elite Body 4 Week Daily Fitness Trainer Day 22

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, Uncategorized, Warm upComments Off on Erin Stern Elite Body 4 Week Daily Fitness Trainer Day 22

Thumbnail

Pro Advice: 6 Surprising Fat-Loss Facts

Most regular gym-goers are there for one thing and one thing only: to lose fat. While there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that goal, many people aren’t training for it in the most efficient ways and thus struggle to make real progress. What’s usually to blame for these ineffective fat-loss plans is a whole bunch of misinformation.

Get the real fat-loss facts right here! These six Optimum athletes know just what it takes to uncover those muscles hiding out under your body fat. Here’s what they have to say about some of those pervasive fat-loss myths.

Tobias Young

FAT-LOSS FALSEHOOD: “If I train abs really hard every day, I will lose belly fat and get a six-pack.”

REALITY: Everyone has a six-pack. It’s a muscle called your rectus abdominus. The only reason it’s not visible on everyone is because it’s usually covered with a layer of body fat. You could do 1,000 crunches seven days per week, but that won’t help you burn that layer of fat.

In order to lose fat, you must monitor your caloric intake and eat fewer calories than you expend. That way, your body will use stored fat for fuel. When your body burns fat for fuel, you don’t get to pick which parts of your body the fat will come off. Eventually, your entire body will be leaner, including that coveted abdominal area!

Jen Thompson

FAT-LOSS FALSEHOOD: “You can turn all of your body fat into toned muscle by lifting weights.”

REALITY: It is not possible to turn your body fat into muscle. Fat is fat and muscle is muscle—you can’t magically turn one into the other by lifting weights or doing cardio. However, weight training is the easiest way to control the shape of your body. The more muscle you have, the more fat your body will burn.

Keep in mind, though, that you can have a lot of muscle and still have fat covering it up. That’s why you need to do weight training, cardio, and have a clean, nutritious diet to maximize your weight loss and body-shaping potential.

Alex Carneiro

FAT-LOSS FALSEHOOD: “When trying to lose weight you need to drop your carbs and fats, but keep your protein intake high.”

REALITY: Fats and carbs both play a role in fat loss. Fats are responsible for hormone production, joint lubrication, and many other important health and muscle-building factors. Dropping your fats too low could compromise your health and your goals. Everyone’s body and metabolism is different, so it’s crucial to know how many grams of healthy fat you need to eat for a balanced nutrition regimen.

Carbs are always perceived as the enemy, but they too have a significant role in fat loss. The body needs glucose to work, and to a certain level, your brain requires it to think and function optimally. Some will argue that technically we don’t need carbs, but many of your body’s basic functions will decrease in performance without the right amount of carbs at the right times.

As for protein, a high-protein diet could benefit people in a caloric deficit.

Kelly Rennie

FAT-LOSS FALSEHOOD: “Eating fat makes you fat.”

REALITY: Fat doesn’t make you fat—consuming too many calories does. Foods that contain fat are part of a healthy diet, help maintain your lean body mass, and assist with metabolic function. Healthy fats, like omega-3 fatty acids, can be found in extra-virgin olive oil, coconut oil, almonds, avocados, cashews, peanuts, walnuts, flaxseeds, and more. If you want to lose fat, you need to eat fewer calories and/or burn more calories.

Noah Siegel

FAT-LOSS FALSEHOOD: “Cardio is all I need for fat loss.”

REALITY: Every gym has the guy or gal who does an hour and half of cardio but never seems to make physique changes. They’re living proof that if you don’t change things up, steady-state cardio will become less and less effective at reducing your body fat.

Most people will be able to quickly lose a few pounds when they start a cardiovascular program. Usually, this “program” is a long, drawn out battle with the treadmill or my most-hated machine, the elliptical. The initial drop in body fat is due to the new stimuli, but that trend quickly begins to taper off until eventually the individual is able to go longer and longer distances without any change in body composition. As you get “better” at doing cardio, your body makes specific adaptations to the stress being placed on it in order to become more efficient. Your body will increase your ability to transport and use oxygen, create more capillaries to deliver blood and oxygen to the needed muscles, and will strengthen the bones and muscles being used.

Simply put, as you get better at the activity, you stop expending the same amount of calories. Eventually, you’ll reach a point where you simply stop burning fat. This is a necessary adaptation from our ancestors who had to travel long distances without the amenities that we have today. (Of course, they weren’t eating any donuts or Big Macs.)

Once your body adapts to the stress you put on it, it’s time to change the stress. Personally, I’d only run for a long distance if I were being chased by a hungry lion, so it’s unlikely you’d catch me on the treadmill. I prefer to do weight training circuits combined with calisthenics, sprints, and jumps to keep things interesting. You can mix things however you wish, as long as you find it challenging.

Example circuit:
Little to no rest between exercises
Rest 3-5 minutes between circuits
Repeat circuit 3 times

20 burpees
20 box jumps
30 air squats
Bear crawl: length of gym
Crab walk: length of the gym
Rope drills (waves, slams, etc.): 4 sets of 30 seconds
Agility ladder drills: 4 sets

This should be about a 20-minute cardio session that yields 10 times the results than an hour of boredom on the treadmill.

Kelechi Opara

FAT-LOSS FALSEHOOD: “Eating small meals frequently speeds up your metabolism so you can burn more fat.”

REALITY: Bro-scientists will insist that eating small portions every 2-3 hours will increase your metabolism. They base this on the thermic effect of food (TEF), which refers to the energy (calorie) cost of your body processing the food you consume. On average, 15 percent of the calories you consume are burned by processing them (although the rate varies by macronutrient). Someone took this idea and assumed that the more frequently people consume their meals, the more frequent TEF will take effect and thus increase fat oxidation.

This seems like a good thought at first. But numerous research studies have proven this to be false and simple math reinforces what these studies already show. Here’s an example:

Let’s look at two people consuming 1800 calories. The 0.15 represents the thermic effect of food.

Person 1 consumes 6 meals of 300 calories: 300 x 0.15 + 300 x 0.15 + 300 x 0.15 + 300 x 0.15 + 300 x 0.15 + 300 x 0.15 = 270 calories burned.

Person 2 consumes 3 meals of 600 calories: 600 x 0.15 + 600 x 0.15 + 600 x 0.15 = 270 calories burned.

As you can see, the amount of calories oxidized through digestion is the same no matter how frequently a person eats.

Eating more frequently holds no metabolic advantage over eating less frequently. Of course, if spreading your meals across six feeds per day is more comfortable and easier for you, then do it. The key is to choose a meal frequency that fits your lifestyle. That way, you’ll be more likely to stick to your plan over time.

Recommended For You

Supplement Company Of The Month: Optimum Nutrition

There’s a reason Optimum Nutrition ranks as Bodybuilding.com’s most popular brand. Learn more about this dynamic supplement giant.

Rock Your Workout

It’s hard to hit a deadlift PR if you have EDM blaring in your headphones. Log into Spotify and download Noah Siegel’s hard rock workout music. Play it loud!

8 Fat-Loss Blunders

Countless people are in the gym to cut body fat, but not everybody succeeds. If you’re having trouble dropping weight, you might be committing one of these fat-loss fatalities!

See original article: 

Pro Advice: 6 Surprising Fat-Loss Facts

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, Uncategorized, Weight loss, Weight TrainingComments Off on Pro Advice: 6 Surprising Fat-Loss Facts

Thumbnail

Ask The Siege: How Do I Improve My Strength And Aesthetics?

QSiege, I’m going to be honest: I’m in the gym to carve a six-pack. But I was wondering if it’s possible to look good and be strong. You seem like the right guy to ask.

I know all about you, bro. You’re in the gym for one thing, and one thing only: aesthetics. Forget about eating, sleeping, or drinking—if you don’t have that coveted V-taper, you might as well pack it in because your life has lost all meaning. Oh, I get it, aesthetics are the new “big.” Nobody talks about how big guys are anymore; it’s all about, “Oh, damn, that guy’s aesthetic as hell!”

Well, that’s nice and all, but pretty little guys have to learn how to look good and be strong. That’s the new rule of fitness. I’m calling it “strengthetics.” Yeah, you can walk around with a good physique and leave everybody ‘mirin, but if you don’t have any go with your show, strong people are going to call you out on it… or laugh at your weak lifts.

Prepare yourself for more articles on this subject—it’s dear to my heart. Today, we’re going to concentrate on your core. A six-pack is a matter of diet; a strong, healthy core is a matter of training. Here’s what you need to know.

“Strengthetics” For Your Abs

A lot of guys like the thought of having a tiny waist and carved six-pack. Shoulder-to-waist ratio is like Hollywood magic—the bigger the ratio the better you look. Abs training, however, doesn’t work how you think it does. If you spend half an hour at the end of every workout doing crunches and can’t figure out why your belly isn’t looking any better, I’ve got some new rules for you to follow.

You’re never going to do another sit-up or crunch again. One of the biggest problems in society is caused by everyone sitting on their asses so much. This sedentary lifestyle makes the hip flexors shorter and the pelvic tilt more pronounced—that’s why back problems are so common. Crunches and sit-ups just add to the stress in your back, so stop doing them!

“Crunches and sit-ups just add to the stress in your back, so stop doing them!”

Do you seriously think that your body evolved the way it has so that you could lay down on the floor, curl up into a fetal position, and somehow grow yourself a six-pack? Your abs were built to stabilize your body through isometric, eccentric, concentric, and rotational contraction in an upright position. Stop lying down on the job.

Compound Your Six-Pack

If you want six-pack that’s actually strong, you need to do standing compound movements like standing presses, squats, front squats, and deadlifts. When you do compound exercises, you train your entire core, along with the other muscles you activate doing those lifts. That means you don’t have to do any extra abdominal work. It’s built in to your workout.

Instead of doing all your shoulder presses seated, stand up and engage your abdominals, lumbar, and a whole mess of other muscles! Doubt that you can work your abs doing presses? Then try a heavy front squat. Unrack the barbell and tell me you can’t feel your abs engage.

Ab-Strength Exercises

If you’re not getting enough compound action in your program, add the exercises below to your workouts a couple times per week. These movements will keep your core nice and tight without making your waist overly wide, and without affecting the hip flexors. We want to keep our midsection slim and trim, so keep that volume down and your strength up!

1 Cable twists

2 sets of 12-15 reps at each height
These can be done from three different positions: low, middle, and high. I suggest a mixture of all three. If you do it from the top, the movement should mimic a sledgehammer swing. Put the cable at the midpoint and make sure your feet are wide so you only engage your upper body. A top-to-bottom cable twist should mimic a bad golf swing.

Each of these variations provides rotational, concentric abdominal work which engages your entire midsection, including the obliques. Make the movement fast and powerful. Go for speed.

2 Overhead medicine ball slam

3 sets to failure
This is full-body movement requires energy generated from the core. Raise a medicine ball above your head with both arms and throw it down as hard as you can. Pick it up and repeat until you are fully exhausted.

3 Planks

2 sets of 30 seconds
During each training session, your goal should be to increase the time you can hold a plank position. Have a partner assist you once you can hold a plank for more than 20 seconds; have your partner push you down or place weight on your back.

4 Ab roller

3 sets of as many reps as possible
I like the ab wheel because it can be scaled to skill level. Start on your knees so you can limit the amount of extension. The extension portion should be slow and controlled. As your strength increases, try doing them from a standing position.

Depending on your skill level, you can do other forms of eccentric work. An advanced athlete could perform dragon flags, but a beginner probably should start by perfecting the ab roll-out and progress from there.



About The Author

In addition to his day-to-day activities, Noah Siegel is also a personal trainer, fitness model, and sponsored athlete for Optimum Nutrition.

Taken from:

Ask The Siege: How Do I Improve My Strength And Aesthetics?

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, UncategorizedComments Off on Ask The Siege: How Do I Improve My Strength And Aesthetics?

<div id="DPG" webReader="178.5"><p>I've been hearing a lot lately from people "in the know" about how competitive athletes should never lift heavy. "All it'll do is make you bulky and slow," they say. "You need high reps. Don't ever squat/deadlift/clean/snatch/row, because those are bad for your knees/back/whatever." You get the picture.</p><img class="float-right c10" src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/heavy-lifting-for-athletes-2.jpg" width="225" height="361" border="0"/><p>So what's the alternative? I look around, and damnit if coaches don't have their clients standing on a stability gadget with legs akimbo and a kettlebell dangling somewhere or other. For crying out loud, they do stuff that would make my yoga friends cringe! And they call it "functional training for sports." What is that? When has training for sports ever not been "functional?" Can somebody tell me the last time they saw a football field or an MMA cage made up of Bosu balls?</p><p>It's time to set things straight. There is a time and place for non-heavy training, for sure. But forsaking heavy training altogether is a bad idea. I've got more than two decades of training elite athletes under my belt from over 30 different sports, and at some point, they all trained heavy. If you want to be elite, I'm here to tell you that, sooner or later, you've gotta put a heavy bar on your back.</p><h3 class="article-title">Forget What You've Been Told</h3><p>Before we get into any of the nitty gritty, let's destroy the most prevalent myths I hear from athletes about lifting heavy.</p><ol class="dpg-list"><li><em>Lifting heavy will make me fat.</em> Only if you eat more than you need. So don't.</li>
<li><em>Lifting heavy will ruin my flexibility.</em> Two words: Flex Wheeler. Next.</li>
<li><em>Lifting heavy will make me overtrain.</em> Not if you cycle like I'm going to show you. If you do any type of training too much, you can overtrain.</li>
<li><em>I will develop an imbalanced physique if I take out isolation exercises.</em> Way wrong. Compound and multi-joint movements will work every muscle like you never have before. If anything, you're more likely to get "unbalanced," whatever you think that means, by living on a steady diet of isolation movements.</li>
</ol><img class="c11" src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/heavy-lifting-for-athletes-3.jpg" width="560" height="363" border="0"/><p>None of this is to say that you should lift heavy all the time, like hitting max lifts five times per week for six weeks straight. Nor is this an excuse to throw around ego-inflating amounts of weight with crappy form. Unfortunately, these are some of the things many people do when they think they're training heavy. Lifting heavy is a planned assault, and I've got your plan.</p><h3 class="article-title">Why Train Heavy?</h3><p>In short, resistance training enhances all other types of training. It's simple physics: Whether you want to hit harder, move faster, or hit an extra gear when victory is on the line, you need your muscles to be able apply more force than your opponent's. And your muscles get better at applying that force when you train with heavy weight.</p><p>When you train heavy—and correctly—these are some of the benefits you can expect:</p><ul class="dpg-list"><li>More power for hitting or pushing into balls, the ground, obstacles, or opponents</li>
<li>More explosive speed</li>
<li>Long-duration power production from more efficient motor unit recruitment</li>
<li>Denser muscles</li>
<li>Bigger muscles</li>
<li>Increased testosterone production</li>
<li>Denser bones</li>
<li>More resilient muscle fibers</li>
</ul><p>How does this sound so far?</p><p>Plus, no matter how exciting your sport may be, trust me when I say there's a special type of thrill that comes from walking up to a weight that should kill you, and then moving it against all that gravity. Knowing that you beat the iron, yourself, and your previous PR, even though you're physically drained, delivers an unequaled rush.</p><h3 class="article-title">The Wavy Road to Heavy</h3><p>I'm a proponent of what's called undulating periodization, or non-linear periodization. Simply put, it's a training regimen that succeeds by having you alternate very light days with I'm-gonna-crush-myself-to-death heavy days. There have been some people over the last few years who claimed to have invented it, but it's been around for about 60 years and originally came from the Eastern Bloc countries.</p><p>Like other forms of periodization, undulating periodization's ultimate aim is to get you to lift a heavier weight over time. But alternating workouts allows you to actually train more than you would be able to if you simply pushed for absolute strength in a linear progression. Along the way, you develop other athletic traits while also saving yourself from injury—and insanity.</p><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/heavy-lifting-for-athletes-1.jpg" width="560" height="375" border="0"/><p>"Like other forms of periodization, undulating periodization's ultimate aim is to get you to lift a heavier weight over time."</p><p>Generally, I suggest hitting a one-rep max on a particular lift only about once a month. Now, don't take that to mean you have license to slack off the other three weeks. During that time, you'll be training for speed, power, and hitting maxes on your other lifts. Yeah, not much rest here.</p><p>Still, I strongly recommend that a program like this should only be undertaken by an experienced lifter, and if you're a competitive athlete, during an off-season. It can be pretty intense, and I don't want you to overdo it.</p><p>The easiest thing for most people to do when implementing a heavy training program, no matter their sport or goal, is to organize their program around three weekly training sessions: a push day, a pull day, and a leg day. Each of these days will also further break down into a weekly heavy strength day, a medium power day, and a light speed day.</p><p>Here's an outline of how it would work over the course of a three-week microcycle:</p><h4 class="article-title">Week 1</h4><div class="left-side-stripe" webReader="-10"><p><strong>Monday: Heavy Legs</strong><br />>95% 1RM, 3 sets of 4 or fewer reps, 5 minute rest<br /><em>Example movement: Back squat</em></p><p><strong>Wednesday: Light Push</strong><br />70-75% 1RM, 4 sets of 10-12 reps, 1 min rest<br /><em>Example movement: Medicine ball chest throw</em></p><p><strong>Friday: Medium Pull</strong><br />83-88% 1RM, 3 sets of 6-8 reps, 2 min rest<br /><em>Example movement: Pull-ups, weighted if necessary</em></p></div><h4 class="article-title">Week 2</h4><div class="left-side-stripe" webReader="-7"><p><strong>Monday: Medium Legs</strong></p><p>83-88% 1RM, 3 sets of 6-8 reps, 2 min rest</p><p><em>Example movement: Front squat</em></p><p><strong>Wednesday: Heavy Push</strong></p><p>>95% 1RM, 3 sets of 4 or fewer reps, 5 minute rest</p><p><em>Example movement: Bench press</em></p><p><strong>Friday: Light Pull</strong></p><p>70-75% 1RM, 4 sets of 10-12 reps, 1 min rest</p><p><em>Example movement: Speed deadlifts</em></p></div><h4 class="article-title">Week 3</h4><div class="left-side-stripe" webReader="-7"><p><strong>Monday: Light legs</strong></p><p>70-75% 1RM, 4 sets of 10-12 reps, 1 min rest</p><p><em>Example movement: Plyometric box work</em></p><p><strong>Wednesday: Medium push</strong></p><p>83-88% 1RM, 3 sets of 6-8 reps, 2 min rest</p><p><em>Example movement: Incline bench presss</em></p><p><strong>Friday: Heavy pull</strong></p><p>>95% 1RM, 3 sets of 4 or fewer reps, 5 minute rest</p><p><em>Example movement: Barbell deadlift</em></p></div><h3 class="article-title">The Details</h3><p>Now, after all of this is said and done, you may be asking yourself, "But wait! What about my beloved accessory movements?" You can include them judiciously in this program, but you need to alter your way of thinking about them.</p><p>Accessories in this regimen are not the same as in a bodybuilding program. As I mentioned before, we're not really concerned here about isolating any single muscle; rather, our thinking must stay focused on the development of overall strength and improved neurological connection to the muscle group. So accessory lifts should be planned to that end: placed after your primary movements, with similar reps, sets, rest, and loads to the rest of the program. A couple of examples include walking lunges on leg day and floor triceps presses on pressing day. Just don't go so overboard with them that they interfere with the project of building strength!</p><p>Another question that rarely gets asked but usually should: "What if I miss a day? Is the whole cycle ruined?" The great thing about this program is that it is flexible and can be altered depending on the condition of the athlete on a particular day. For example, say we're doing a 6-week cycle, and we have an athlete scheduled for a heavy leg day, but he comes into our facility feeling exhausted from practice. Max effort is out of the question, so we can switch out his heavy leg day for a light leg day, and then we'll make up the heavy day the next week. As long as the integrity of the overall program is maintained, he'll keep making progress.</p><p>This program is simple, but I've seen it work wonders with a wide range of athletes. Cycle it in and benefit from the basics. Strong muscles are the foundation of everything else in athletics, so don't be afraid to go heavy!</p><br /><br class="c12"/></div><div class="padded-content article-content mod-about-the-author" id="article-about-author" webReader="38.4738095238"><h4 class="article-section-header">About The Author</h4><div class="ata-left-column" webReader="6.25"><div class="ata-author-name"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/michael-palmieri.html">Michael S. Palmieri</a></div><div class="author-gradient-button"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/michael-palmieri.html">VIEW AUTHOR PAGE</a></div><p class="ata-author-summary">Michael is the Director of Performance and Research at The Institute of Sport Science & Athletic Conditioning in Las Vegas.</p></div><div class="ata-right-column"><div class="ata-author-image-frame"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/michael-palmieri.html"><img src="images/2013/writer-michael-palmieri-sig-new.jpg" alt=""/></a></div><div class="ata-view-all-articles-link"><ul class="bb-chevron-list bold-type"><li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/michael-palmieri.html#articles" class="bold-type">View All Articles By This Author</a></li>
</ul></div></div></div>

Get Under The Bar: Heavy Lifting For Athletes

I’ve been hearing a lot lately from people “in the know” about how competitive athletes should never lift heavy. “All it’ll do is make you bulky and slow,” they say. “You need high reps. Don’t ever squat/deadlift/clean/snatch/row, because those are bad for your knees/back/whatever.” You get the picture.

So what’s the alternative? I look around, and damnit if coaches don’t have their clients standing on a stability gadget with legs akimbo and a kettlebell dangling somewhere or other. For crying out loud, they do stuff that would make my yoga friends cringe! And they call it “functional training for sports.” What is that? When has training for sports ever not been “functional?” Can somebody tell me the last time they saw a football field or an MMA cage made up of Bosu balls?

It’s time to set things straight. There is a time and place for non-heavy training, for sure. But forsaking heavy training altogether is a bad idea. I’ve got more than two decades of training elite athletes under my belt from over 30 different sports, and at some point, they all trained heavy. If you want to be elite, I’m here to tell you that, sooner or later, you’ve gotta put a heavy bar on your back.

Forget What You’ve Been Told

Before we get into any of the nitty gritty, let’s destroy the most prevalent myths I hear from athletes about lifting heavy.

  1. Lifting heavy will make me fat. Only if you eat more than you need. So don’t.
  2. Lifting heavy will ruin my flexibility. Two words: Flex Wheeler. Next.
  3. Lifting heavy will make me overtrain. Not if you cycle like I’m going to show you. If you do any type of training too much, you can overtrain.
  4. I will develop an imbalanced physique if I take out isolation exercises. Way wrong. Compound and multi-joint movements will work every muscle like you never have before. If anything, you’re more likely to get “unbalanced,” whatever you think that means, by living on a steady diet of isolation movements.

None of this is to say that you should lift heavy all the time, like hitting max lifts five times per week for six weeks straight. Nor is this an excuse to throw around ego-inflating amounts of weight with crappy form. Unfortunately, these are some of the things many people do when they think they’re training heavy. Lifting heavy is a planned assault, and I’ve got your plan.

Why Train Heavy?

In short, resistance training enhances all other types of training. It’s simple physics: Whether you want to hit harder, move faster, or hit an extra gear when victory is on the line, you need your muscles to be able apply more force than your opponent’s. And your muscles get better at applying that force when you train with heavy weight.

When you train heavy—and correctly—these are some of the benefits you can expect:

  • More power for hitting or pushing into balls, the ground, obstacles, or opponents
  • More explosive speed
  • Long-duration power production from more efficient motor unit recruitment
  • Denser muscles
  • Bigger muscles
  • Increased testosterone production
  • Denser bones
  • More resilient muscle fibers

How does this sound so far?

Plus, no matter how exciting your sport may be, trust me when I say there’s a special type of thrill that comes from walking up to a weight that should kill you, and then moving it against all that gravity. Knowing that you beat the iron, yourself, and your previous PR, even though you’re physically drained, delivers an unequaled rush.

The Wavy Road to Heavy

I’m a proponent of what’s called undulating periodization, or non-linear periodization. Simply put, it’s a training regimen that succeeds by having you alternate very light days with I’m-gonna-crush-myself-to-death heavy days. There have been some people over the last few years who claimed to have invented it, but it’s been around for about 60 years and originally came from the Eastern Bloc countries.

Like other forms of periodization, undulating periodization’s ultimate aim is to get you to lift a heavier weight over time. But alternating workouts allows you to actually train more than you would be able to if you simply pushed for absolute strength in a linear progression. Along the way, you develop other athletic traits while also saving yourself from injury—and insanity.

“Like other forms of periodization, undulating periodization’s ultimate aim is to get you to lift a heavier weight over time.”

Generally, I suggest hitting a one-rep max on a particular lift only about once a month. Now, don’t take that to mean you have license to slack off the other three weeks. During that time, you’ll be training for speed, power, and hitting maxes on your other lifts. Yeah, not much rest here.

Still, I strongly recommend that a program like this should only be undertaken by an experienced lifter, and if you’re a competitive athlete, during an off-season. It can be pretty intense, and I don’t want you to overdo it.

The easiest thing for most people to do when implementing a heavy training program, no matter their sport or goal, is to organize their program around three weekly training sessions: a push day, a pull day, and a leg day. Each of these days will also further break down into a weekly heavy strength day, a medium power day, and a light speed day.

Here’s an outline of how it would work over the course of a three-week microcycle:

Week 1

Monday: Heavy Legs
>95% 1RM, 3 sets of 4 or fewer reps, 5 minute rest
Example movement: Back squat

Wednesday: Light Push
70-75% 1RM, 4 sets of 10-12 reps, 1 min rest
Example movement: Medicine ball chest throw

Friday: Medium Pull
83-88% 1RM, 3 sets of 6-8 reps, 2 min rest
Example movement: Pull-ups, weighted if necessary

Week 2

Monday: Medium Legs

83-88% 1RM, 3 sets of 6-8 reps, 2 min rest

Example movement: Front squat

Wednesday: Heavy Push

>95% 1RM, 3 sets of 4 or fewer reps, 5 minute rest

Example movement: Bench press

Friday: Light Pull

70-75% 1RM, 4 sets of 10-12 reps, 1 min rest

Example movement: Speed deadlifts

Week 3

Monday: Light legs

70-75% 1RM, 4 sets of 10-12 reps, 1 min rest

Example movement: Plyometric box work

Wednesday: Medium push

83-88% 1RM, 3 sets of 6-8 reps, 2 min rest

Example movement: Incline bench presss

Friday: Heavy pull

>95% 1RM, 3 sets of 4 or fewer reps, 5 minute rest

Example movement: Barbell deadlift

The Details

Now, after all of this is said and done, you may be asking yourself, “But wait! What about my beloved accessory movements?” You can include them judiciously in this program, but you need to alter your way of thinking about them.

Accessories in this regimen are not the same as in a bodybuilding program. As I mentioned before, we’re not really concerned here about isolating any single muscle; rather, our thinking must stay focused on the development of overall strength and improved neurological connection to the muscle group. So accessory lifts should be planned to that end: placed after your primary movements, with similar reps, sets, rest, and loads to the rest of the program. A couple of examples include walking lunges on leg day and floor triceps presses on pressing day. Just don’t go so overboard with them that they interfere with the project of building strength!

Another question that rarely gets asked but usually should: “What if I miss a day? Is the whole cycle ruined?” The great thing about this program is that it is flexible and can be altered depending on the condition of the athlete on a particular day. For example, say we’re doing a 6-week cycle, and we have an athlete scheduled for a heavy leg day, but he comes into our facility feeling exhausted from practice. Max effort is out of the question, so we can switch out his heavy leg day for a light leg day, and then we’ll make up the heavy day the next week. As long as the integrity of the overall program is maintained, he’ll keep making progress.

This program is simple, but I’ve seen it work wonders with a wide range of athletes. Cycle it in and benefit from the basics. Strong muscles are the foundation of everything else in athletics, so don’t be afraid to go heavy!


About The Author

Michael is the Director of Performance and Research at The Institute of Sport Science & Athletic Conditioning in Las Vegas.

See original: 

Get Under The Bar: Heavy Lifting For Athletes

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, UncategorizedComments Off on Get Under The Bar: Heavy Lifting For Athletes

<div id="DPG" webReader="17.3272933182"><h5 class="c8"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/built-by-science-day-39.html">Back</a> | <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/built-by-science-six-week-muscle-building-trainer.html">Main</a> | <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/built-by-science-day-41.html">Next</a></h5><p>Fewer reps could only mean one thing: more weight. Saddle your shoulders with serious iron and get started. In order to reap real gains, you must go heavy.</p><p>Show this workout that you're the boss and bring some intensity to the table. Focus on slow, steady, controlled movements that force you to use your muscle and not just maximize on momentum.</p><p>I know we're getting to the end of the program, but that doesn't mean you get to forget all about your nutrition. Continue to fuel your body with healthy, whole food that will support your muscle-building goals.</p><div id="meal-plan-table"><ul class="defined"><li class="rowBgColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-shoulder-press')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/308/Male/t/308_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Shoulder Press" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-shoulder-press')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/308/Male/t/308_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Shoulder Press" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-shoulder-press')">Barbell Shoulder Press</a></strong><br />5 sets of 5 reps<br />Tempo: 2-0-1. Rest: 180 seconds</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('bent-over-low-pulley-side-lateral')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/73/Male/t/73_1.jpg" alt="Bent Over Low-Pulley Side Lateral" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('bent-over-low-pulley-side-lateral')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/73/Male/t/73_2.jpg" alt="Bent Over Low-Pulley Side Lateral" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('bent-over-low-pulley-side-lateral')">Bent Over Low-Pulley Side Lateral</a></strong><br />3-4 sets of 10 reps<br />Tempo: 2-1-1. Rest: 90 seconds</span></li>
<li class="rowBgColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('side-lateral-raise')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/373/Male/t/373_1.jpg" alt="Side Lateral Raise" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('side-lateral-raise')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/373/Male/t/373_2.jpg" alt="Side Lateral Raise" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('side-lateral-raise')">Side Lateral Raise</a></strong><br />3-4 sets of 10 reps<br />Tempo: 2-1-1. Rest: 60 seconds</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('farmers-walk')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/682/Male/t/682_1.jpg" alt="Dumbbell Loaded Carry" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('farmers-walk')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/682/Male/t/682_2.jpg" alt="Dumbbell Loaded Carry" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('farmers-walk')">Dumbbell Loaded Carry</a></strong><br />3-4 sets of 100 feet<br />Rest: 60 seconds</span></li>
</ul></div><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/cellucor/built-by-science-30-day-stack.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/builtbyscience_stack_banner.jpg" width="560" height="144" border="0" class="c11"/></a><h5 class="c8"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/built-by-science-day-39.html">Back</a> | <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/built-by-science-six-week-muscle-building-trainer.html">Main</a> | <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/built-by-science-day-41.html">Next</a></h5><br class="c12"/></div><div class="padded-content article-content mod-about-the-author" id="article-about-author" webReader="39.8434782609"><h4 class="article-section-header">About The Author</h4><div class="ata-left-column" webReader="8.55555555556"><div class="ata-author-name"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/mike-robertson.html">Mike Robertson, C.S.C.S.</a></div><div class="author-gradient-button"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/mike-robertson.html">VIEW AUTHOR PAGE</a></div><p class="ata-author-summary">Mike Robertson, CSCS, has helped people from all walks of life achieve their strength, physique and performance-related goals. Learn more.</p></div><div class="ata-right-column"><div class="ata-author-image-frame"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/mike-robertson.html"><img src="images/2013/writer-mike-robertson-sig-new.jpg" alt=""/></a></div><div class="ata-view-all-articles-link"><ul class="bb-chevron-list bold-type"><li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/mike-robertson.html#articles" class="bold-type">View All Articles By This Author</a></li>
</ul></div></div></div>

Built By Science Daily Trainer: Day 40, Shoulders

Back | Main | Next

Fewer reps could only mean one thing: more weight. Saddle your shoulders with serious iron and get started. In order to reap real gains, you must go heavy.

Show this workout that you’re the boss and bring some intensity to the table. Focus on slow, steady, controlled movements that force you to use your muscle and not just maximize on momentum.

I know we’re getting to the end of the program, but that doesn’t mean you get to forget all about your nutrition. Continue to fuel your body with healthy, whole food that will support your muscle-building goals.

Back | Main | Next


About The Author

Mike Robertson, CSCS, has helped people from all walks of life achieve their strength, physique and performance-related goals. Learn more.

Original source: 

Built By Science Daily Trainer: Day 40, Shoulders

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, UncategorizedComments Off on Built By Science Daily Trainer: Day 40, Shoulders


Archives

March 2017
M T W T F S S
« Feb    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

WordPress Autoblog Plugin

Content Protected Using Blog Protector By: PcDrome.

Enjoy this blog? Please spread the word :)