Tag Archive | "technique"

chest-press-with-resistance-band

Chest press with resistance band

How to

1. Attach the centre of the band to a stationary object and hold one end in each hand

2. Stand with your back to the attachment, elbows bent and shoulders abducted to 90 degrees (upper arm level with shoulder) so that your hands are next to your chest.

3. Push forwards and straighten your arms out in front of you.

4. Slowly return to the starting position.


Why use resistance bands?

They are super affordable and the ideal fitness multi-tasker. Just choose the right band based on your weight – it’s all written on either the packaging, online or ask in store. As you get stronger you’ll need to lower the assistance to account for your new strength.

For example, a robust general tension band combined with a heavy band offers roughly the same amount of resistance as a power band, but the combination gives you three different levels of assistance (one with the heavy band, one with robust, and one with both bands). Colours denote the different band strengths and vary between brands.

Source

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Running tips for women

Ace your next race with these top tips

Going for a run is probably one of the most popular ways to get your workout on, whether it’s hitting the roads or jumping on a treadmill when the weather’s gross outside. If you sometimes find running a little tedious, why not challenge yourself to go faster or further?

Here are our top tips to smash your run.

To the gym

Weight training could make you a better runner. A Norwegian study found that resistance training three times a week for eight weeks significantly improved running efficiency and endurance in well-trained, long-distance runners.

Uphill battle

Want to conquer the hills? To race uphill, run with a short stride while pushing off the balls of your feet and pumping your arms. Then relax your arms and use a longer stride to go downhill.

Ready, set, splash!

Getting wet could make you a better runner. Swimming increases your upper body strength, making your runs more efficient, while aqua jogging mimics your usual movement sans impact – reducing the risk of injury.

Bright idea

‘Watch your stance when running,’ tips Fitness First trainer Andy Hall. ‘Leaping forward and striding too far will drain your energy fast. Instead, make sure you stand tall and lean slightly forward, so when you feel like you’re going to fall, you step forward just enough to catch yourself. This should be the length of your stride.’

Take five

Listen to your body! If you’re feeling under the weather or if your body is sore and ready for a rest, take a recovery day. Only you know if those aches and pains are from a good run or the sign you need to rest.

Sand storm

Here’s a good excuse to book a beach getaway – running on sand can improve your speed and muscle tone. A study from St Luke’s University Clinic in Belgium found that pounding the sand requires 1.6 times more energy than running on pavements as your body has to work harder to deal with the soft, unstable surface. That adds up to more defined muscles and a swifter run when you get back to solid ground. Neat!

Drink up

Hydration is key for runners, but plain old water is best if you’re only doing short runs. Upgrade to a sports drink if you’re running for longer than an hour to help shuttle glucose to your muscles and combat fatigue.

Play it safe Protect yourself – the great outdoors brings potential hazards:

Navigate new destinations Make use of online running forums and social media groups to discover popular routes. Clearly defined, well-lit roads are a must when running in the dark, and remember there’s safety in numbers. Recruit a running buddy or join a club to improve your technique with like-minded enthusiasts – it’s way more fun than going solo!

Ditch your headphones An uplifting playlist can send motivation soaring, but when you’re running outside you need to be aware of your surroundings so you can rely on your senses when you need them. Save the tunes for your indoor workout and shift your attention to your breathing and form – or if you feel you really can’t run without music just keep the volume low.

Check the forecast We all know the British weather is unpredictable. It’s worth checking the forecast before you lace up so you don’t get caught in heavy rain that could hamper your performance and increase your risk of injury.

Read the article –

Running tips for women

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8 Minutes to a Gorgeous Upper Body

The key to rocking shoulder-baring sweaters and blouses this season is pairing them with a strong, toned upper body.

Contrary to popular belief, you don’t need to speed hours in the gym to achieve an eye-catching upper body.

What you need is a challenging workout—one that cranks up the intensity on your muscles and eliminates every last ounce of flab. Enter Tabata training, also known as the four-minute fat-burning workout.

There’s a reason this type of high-intensity interval training is the go-to when you want to shed pounds and tone up fast—it works.

 GETTING STARTED

A Tabata workout (not including warm up and cool down) involves performing 20 seconds of high-intensity exercise followed by 10 seconds of active recovery. You repeat this cycle eight times, for a total of four minutes of very short, intense bursts of exercise.

In this particular workout, you’ll complete two Tabatas, for a total of eight minutes of high-intensity intervals.

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8 Minutes to a Gorgeous Upper Body

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Time Saver Workout: Fast Four

WORKOUT BY: Leandro Cavalho, Creator of the Beachbody Brazil Butt Lift

For quick and effective workouts, you’re better off focusing on the larger muscle groups like the chest, back, glutes, quads, hamstrings, abs, and shoulders. For this workout, there are a total of 4 moves: Beginners can start with 1 set of each move; intermediate, 2–3 sets; advanced, do 4 or more sets.

EXERCISE 1

Walking Pushup: Bend over at the waist, keeping a flat back, until your hands touch floor. Walk hands out to a pushup position and perform 1 pushup, then walk hands back and return to standing. Each time increase number of pushups done by 1. Beginners, go up to 3–4 reps, intermediate/ advanced, 5–6 reps. After your sixth rep, perform 10 pushups.

EXERCISE 2

Squat: Beginners, do this exercise 12 times holding 12 lb. dumbbells; intermediate, 15 times holding 15 lb. dumbbells; advanced, 20 times holding 20 lb. dumbbells.

EXERCISE 3

Bentover Row: Beginners, use one 8–12 lb. weight in each hand and do 12 reps; intermediate, 15 lb. doing 15 reps; advanced, 20 lb. doing 20 reps.

EXERCISE 4

Inverted Tabletop: Lie faceup with knees above hips, feet flexed and positioned slightly higher than knees, hands behind head. Start with double reps: In 1 count, lift head, neck, and shoulders, bringing knees in toward chest. Then lift shoulder blades and tailbone a little higher for 1 more count. Return to start in 2 counts, bringing your head back down to touch mat. Then do single reps: Perform the move for 1 count up, 1 count down. Then do short reps: “Pulse” at top of move rather than returning back to the start. Beginner: Do 8 double counts, 8 single counts, 8 shortsIntermediate: Do 12 double counts, 12 single counts, 12 shorts Advanced: Do 16 double counts, 16 single counts, 16 shorts.

 From –

Time Saver Workout: Fast Four

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HE1215_FEPLY_01

20-Minute Fat Blaster

No Time For A Full Workout Today?

Squat Jump

Squeeze in this fast and furious fat blaster, designed to work every major muscle while burning mega calories. “Every move here is explosive — you’re working different muscle groups in a variety of directions for optimum conditioning,” explains New York-based trainer Holly Rilinger.

Do each move for 30 seconds, resting as little as possible (up to 10 seconds) between each one. “Because you’re rotating between lower body, upper body, and core moves you’re already getting rest, so you can keep downtime to a minimum,” adds Rilinger.

Ball Slam

Explosive Crunch

Box Jump

Plyo Pushup

Lateral Box Jump

Speed Skater

 

 

Continued here:

20-Minute Fat Blaster

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Strike a balance with this Inner thigh exercise

Want to boost gym performance? It’s time to balance out your intense workouts with a good old dance-inspired stretch

Blocking out the time to really delve into a stretching session can seem hard to justify if your busy schedule already makes squeezing workouts in difficult.

But if you’ve found yourself hitting a wall when it comes to results, or you’re constantly plagued by niggling injuries, it might just be what the doctor ordered. US-based Lastics has taken inspo from the long, lean and limber bodies of dancers to come up with classes and online videos to help regular gym-goers get the most out of their workouts. ‘Dancers epitomise the balance between strength and flexibility to the extreme,’ says Lastics founder Donna Flagg. ‘Their bodies are graceful, sculpted and powerful.’

Rather than overhauling your entire workout routine to emulate that of a ballerina, Lastics instead allows you to simply take a leaf out of their book, providing stretching-focused classes to help you develop an improved range of motion. This is essential to anyone who’s looking to prevent injuries, boost conditioning and balance out strength training – as well as achieve a slender silhouette. ‘Lastics enhances all other activities, improves posture and circulation and gives you more freedom to move in your body,’ Donna adds. So if you’re intrigued by the slenderness and strength of a dancer but don’t necessarily have any goals to make it as one (bar the occasional tear-up on the dance floor on a Friday night), this is the perfect middle ground.

If you’re interested in subscribing to Lastics, trying out the DVD or even just having a taster of what it might be like, give this workout a go. Donna has devised it especially to supplement WF’s workouts, but it’s a wise and healthy addition to any active woman’s weekly routine. It can even be added to the end of a workout if you don’t want to dedicate an entire session to it.

How to do it

Breathe into the stretch and release when the body starts to resist. Then take a few breaths and release deeper into the stretch on each exhale. Repeat as desired.

Technique

Sit in a straddle and let your head hang between your legs, rounding your back. Release any tension you may be holding.

After you’ve been hanging there totally relaxed, reach your nose a little closer to the floor. Hold your upper body where it is and press the backs of your knees down into the floor.

Hold your body and knees in place and flex your feet, making sure your knees don’t pop back up.

Finally, hold all of that and lift your chin to flatten your back. Hold for a few seconds.

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Strike a balance with this Inner thigh exercise

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Romanian deadlift

One of the most effective workouts for strengthening your glutes and hamstrings is the romanian deadlift. When performed correctly, it involves a hip hinge movement and uses the muscles that are vital in performing other excerises in lifting, jumping and sprinting.

While your glutes and hamstrings are engaged- You’ll find that the muscles in the front (quadriceps) are also being used, as well as the upper back muscles, which is an effective way of strengthening your back muscles and posture (along side other back exercises). 

Technique

  • Hold the bar with an overhand grip approximately shoulder-width (your thumbs should brush the outside of your thighs).
  • Place your feet approximately hip-width apart, with knees soft and your feet straight ahead.
  • Maintaining a flat back position, bend forward at the hips lowering the bar towards the floor.
  • Reverse the position, extend your hips and return to the start position. 
  • Perform 8-10 reps (3-4 sets) 
  • Safety tip: keep your shoulder blades engaged as you lower.

For information about strength and conditioning training, check out The Strength & Conditioning Bible: How to train Like an Athlete by fitness expert and coach Nick Grantham

Originally posted here: 

Romanian deadlift

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<div id="DPG" webReader="195.019246353"><p>Among lifters, there aren't many people who will shy away from wanting to build a strong, chiseled chest. After all, they know beastly chest muscles scream strength and power, and look great on the beach.</p><p>Functionally, strong pecs also assist with performing everyday activities, lower the risk of shoulder injuries, and provide that extra edge in sports and in the gym. Simply put, a well-built chest is, well, pectacular. Sorry.</p><p>It's high time for you to get your chest training out of a rut. Use and share these tips to reassess your chest routine and pave your way to pec success.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">1 Stick With Basics</h3>
</p><p>When the chest game starts to falter, some people react by piling on ridiculous-sounding accessory work like a one-handed, reverse lay-up upper-cut. No need to reinvent the wheel here; there are no secret exercises.</p><img src="images/2014/7-ways-to-pump-up-your-chest-graphic-1.jpg" width="560" height="447"/><p>Perfect your technique and form and identify the best rep range for your objective. The basics will help your chest grow!</p><p>Tried-and-true foundational exercises like ye olde bench press, dumbbell press, incline press, and chest flye have helped top lifters such as <a href="http://contest.bodybuilding.com/bio/94862/">Steve Reeves</a>, Arnold, and countless other folks throughout the years. So why wouldn't they work for you?</p><p>Before trying to change things, make sure you master these movements. Perfect your technique and form and identify the best rep range for your objective. After all, any structurally solid building must rise from a strong foundation.</p><p>Exercises like the bench press are the cornerstones for a powerful chest. Still doubtful? Look to IFBB Physique Pro <a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/craigcapurso/">Craig Capurso</a>, who uses these exercises to build his rock-solid chest.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">2 Everyone Should Train Chest</h3>
</p><p>Yep, that includes you, ladies. Unfortunately, some women need to banish these <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/a-girls-gotta-bench-chest-workout-and-training-tips.html">false preconceived notions</a> of how chest exercises could negatively impact their bust. No, they will not shrink your bust. No, they will not make you look like She-Hulk. So stop worrying over these unfounded concerns!</p><img src="images/2014/7-ways-to-pump-up-your-chest-graphic-2.jpg" width="264" height="282" border="0" class="right-image c12"/><p>Despite fears of lost bust size, both men and women should train their chests regularly.</p><p>If there's someone who has both a strong <em>and</em> good-looking chest, it's WBFF Pro <a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/fitnessjewell/">Jen Jewell</a>. Jen knows the importance of chest day and likes to include as many different movements into her chest workout as possible, including presses, flyes, and push-up variations.</p><p>"Just because [women] may not be out to build the biggest pecs out there doesn't mean we should neglect chest training," she says. "Our chests are a major muscle group. We wouldn't neglect training our back, so why would we skip out on chest day?"</p><p>It's like those dudes who exclusively train upper body and end up with chopsticks for legs. The same concept of imbalance echoes here: Working out one group of muscles but ignoring another group could make you look (and function) disproportionate.</p><p>Jen continues: "If we neglect training our chests, it could lead to a muscular imbalance in our physique and impact our training all around—we can't have that, now can we?! When we are working our chests, our shoulders and triceps are involved, too. And ladies, there's another bonus! Even though you can't increase the size of your breasts themselves with training, you can tighten the muscles of the chest, which makes for an even perkier bust line."</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">3 Squeeze</h3>
</p><p>Squeeze what, you ask? Well, there's your problem.</p><p>When benching, you want to squeeze two things: the bar handle and your pec muscles. When I say squeeze your pecs, I don't mean using your hands to actually squeeze them. On the concentric, or lifting, portion of your reps, think about contracting your pecs. Squeezing increases the pump and the work involved, as well as the density of the muscle. It won't be easy, but your hard efforts will be rewarded.</p><img src="images/2014/7-ways-to-pump-up-your-chest-graphic-3.jpg" width="560" height="376"/><p>Squeezing the bar with your grip increases the pump and the work involved, as well as the density of the muscle.</p><p>Also make sure you squeeze the bar or dumbbell handle as if you want to crush it in the palm of your hands. This clench will invite more fibers to the pump party, resulting in increased strength down the road.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">4 Focus On Form</h3>
</p><p>Proper lifting form trumps everything else. If your form collapses, it doesn't matter that you're slinging twice your body weight.</p><p>If the intended muscle fibers aren't recruited correctly, other muscle groups may dominate the exercise, which adds unnecessary stress to muscle groups that aren't designed to bear heavy loads. That's how you get hurt. No one builds a strong chest while sitting in physical therapy or dealing with an injured back or shoulder. Throwing up big bench numbers may impress the bros at your gym, but it's not a good long-term strategy if those numbers come at the expense of good form.</p><p>Executing proper form, performing reps at a slower tempo, and focusing on using your chest throughout the movement will maximize the intensity and effectiveness of the workout, while minimizing injury risk.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">5 Push Yourself</h3>
</p><p>Your body is an amazing, intelligent machine that will adapt to stress quickly. If you don't push it hard enough, it won't grow. It's as simple as that.</p><p>While proper form still rules the day, muscle growth requires progressively increased stimuli. This increase leads to breaking down the muscle fibers and rebuilding stronger and bigger ones, preparing you for the next time you go against the iron.</p><img src="images/2014/7-ways-to-pump-up-your-chest-graphic-4.jpg" width="560" height="409" border="0" class="c14"/><h6 class="altH6 c15">Dumbbell Flye</h6><p>As you grow more comfortable performing the movement perfectly within a certain weight range, push yourself to take on more weight—as long as your form stays tight.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">6 Rest, Pause, Drop</h3>
</p><p>When adding more weight is no longer a challenging option, there's another method for making your next chest workout a sufferfest. I call it the "rest, pause, drop" method—RPD, for short—and no, it isn't a new dance routine.</p><p>I combined two intensity-raising techniques: <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/reading_workout_logs.htm#9">rest-pause</a> and <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/reading_workout_logs.htm#8">dropsets</a>. The former breaks up one set into several subsets with brief rest worked into the whole set. The latter is a technique that allows you to continue an exercise with a lighter weight after your muscles have tapped out at a heavier weight. My rest, pause, drop methodology applied to a chest workout makes for absolute muscle-building brutality and is designed to train all your muscle fiber varieties at once.</p><div class="left-side-stripe" webReader="-14"><h5>Rest</h5><p>Start with a weight you can do for 6-8 reps and go to failure (use a spotter). Rest for 5 seconds and then try for a couple of more.</p><h5>Pause</h5><p>Reduce the weight by 20-25 percent. Repeat what you just did, including the rest-pause, for 5 seconds.</p><h5>Drop</h5><p>Reduce the weight again—by the same amount you did last time—and repeat the rest-pause set one more time.</p></div><p>The final result is a 25-30 rep set. Beginners can do one set of this at the end of their chest workout, but I don't recommend any more than that. Advanced lifters can include this RPD set with each exercise next Monday. (Everyone still does chest on Monday, right?)</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">7 Dust Off the Decline</h3>
</p><p>You know that decline bench? The sloped brute that gathered a thick layer of dust from underuse? Well, this underrated angle can be a huge boon to your chest routine. It is approved by strongman <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/fitness-360-colton-leonard-stronger-than-stone.html">Colton Leonard</a>, who knows a thing or two about strong pecs.</p><p>Comparing exercises done on a flat bench versus a decline bench, some studies have shown that more muscle fibers in the pec are recruited while on the decline. Try this out with both a barbell and dumbbells.</p><p>Put these tips to the test and share your results with me and the rest of us in the comments below!</p><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/cellucor/cellucor.htm"><img src="images/2013/cellucor-banner.jpg" width="560" height="144"/></a><br class="c16"/></div><div class="padded-content article-content mod-about-the-author" id="article-about-author" webReader="41.328125"><h4 class="article-section-header">About The Author</h4><div class="ata-left-column" webReader="8.2183908046"><div class="ata-author-name"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/roger_lockridge.htm">Roger Lockridge</a></div><div class="author-gradient-button"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/roger_lockridge.htm">VIEW AUTHOR PAGE</a></div><p class="ata-author-summary">Bodybuilding is the reason I am who I am today. I am more confident in myself, actually looking for the next challenge, and inspiring others.</p></div><div class="ata-right-column"><div class="ata-author-image-frame"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/roger_lockridge.htm"><img src="images/2013/writer-roger-lockridge-sig-new.jpg" alt=""/></a></div><div class="ata-view-all-articles-link"><ul class="bb-chevron-list bold-type"><li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/roger_lockridge.htm#articles" class="bold-type">View All Articles By This Author</a></li>
</ul></div></div></div>

7 Ways To Pump Up Your Chest

Among lifters, there aren’t many people who will shy away from wanting to build a strong, chiseled chest. After all, they know beastly chest muscles scream strength and power, and look great on the beach.

Functionally, strong pecs also assist with performing everyday activities, lower the risk of shoulder injuries, and provide that extra edge in sports and in the gym. Simply put, a well-built chest is, well, pectacular. Sorry.

It’s high time for you to get your chest training out of a rut. Use and share these tips to reassess your chest routine and pave your way to pec success.

1 Stick With Basics

When the chest game starts to falter, some people react by piling on ridiculous-sounding accessory work like a one-handed, reverse lay-up upper-cut. No need to reinvent the wheel here; there are no secret exercises.

Perfect your technique and form and identify the best rep range for your objective. The basics will help your chest grow!

Tried-and-true foundational exercises like ye olde bench press, dumbbell press, incline press, and chest flye have helped top lifters such as Steve Reeves, Arnold, and countless other folks throughout the years. So why wouldn’t they work for you?

Before trying to change things, make sure you master these movements. Perfect your technique and form and identify the best rep range for your objective. After all, any structurally solid building must rise from a strong foundation.

Exercises like the bench press are the cornerstones for a powerful chest. Still doubtful? Look to IFBB Physique Pro Craig Capurso, who uses these exercises to build his rock-solid chest.

2 Everyone Should Train Chest

Yep, that includes you, ladies. Unfortunately, some women need to banish these false preconceived notions of how chest exercises could negatively impact their bust. No, they will not shrink your bust. No, they will not make you look like She-Hulk. So stop worrying over these unfounded concerns!

Despite fears of lost bust size, both men and women should train their chests regularly.

If there’s someone who has both a strong and good-looking chest, it’s WBFF Pro Jen Jewell. Jen knows the importance of chest day and likes to include as many different movements into her chest workout as possible, including presses, flyes, and push-up variations.

“Just because [women] may not be out to build the biggest pecs out there doesn’t mean we should neglect chest training,” she says. “Our chests are a major muscle group. We wouldn’t neglect training our back, so why would we skip out on chest day?”

It’s like those dudes who exclusively train upper body and end up with chopsticks for legs. The same concept of imbalance echoes here: Working out one group of muscles but ignoring another group could make you look (and function) disproportionate.

Jen continues: “If we neglect training our chests, it could lead to a muscular imbalance in our physique and impact our training all around—we can’t have that, now can we?! When we are working our chests, our shoulders and triceps are involved, too. And ladies, there’s another bonus! Even though you can’t increase the size of your breasts themselves with training, you can tighten the muscles of the chest, which makes for an even perkier bust line.”

3 Squeeze

Squeeze what, you ask? Well, there’s your problem.

When benching, you want to squeeze two things: the bar handle and your pec muscles. When I say squeeze your pecs, I don’t mean using your hands to actually squeeze them. On the concentric, or lifting, portion of your reps, think about contracting your pecs. Squeezing increases the pump and the work involved, as well as the density of the muscle. It won’t be easy, but your hard efforts will be rewarded.

Squeezing the bar with your grip increases the pump and the work involved, as well as the density of the muscle.

Also make sure you squeeze the bar or dumbbell handle as if you want to crush it in the palm of your hands. This clench will invite more fibers to the pump party, resulting in increased strength down the road.

4 Focus On Form

Proper lifting form trumps everything else. If your form collapses, it doesn’t matter that you’re slinging twice your body weight.

If the intended muscle fibers aren’t recruited correctly, other muscle groups may dominate the exercise, which adds unnecessary stress to muscle groups that aren’t designed to bear heavy loads. That’s how you get hurt. No one builds a strong chest while sitting in physical therapy or dealing with an injured back or shoulder. Throwing up big bench numbers may impress the bros at your gym, but it’s not a good long-term strategy if those numbers come at the expense of good form.

Executing proper form, performing reps at a slower tempo, and focusing on using your chest throughout the movement will maximize the intensity and effectiveness of the workout, while minimizing injury risk.

5 Push Yourself

Your body is an amazing, intelligent machine that will adapt to stress quickly. If you don’t push it hard enough, it won’t grow. It’s as simple as that.

While proper form still rules the day, muscle growth requires progressively increased stimuli. This increase leads to breaking down the muscle fibers and rebuilding stronger and bigger ones, preparing you for the next time you go against the iron.

Dumbbell Flye

As you grow more comfortable performing the movement perfectly within a certain weight range, push yourself to take on more weight—as long as your form stays tight.

6 Rest, Pause, Drop

When adding more weight is no longer a challenging option, there’s another method for making your next chest workout a sufferfest. I call it the “rest, pause, drop” method—RPD, for short—and no, it isn’t a new dance routine.

I combined two intensity-raising techniques: rest-pause and dropsets. The former breaks up one set into several subsets with brief rest worked into the whole set. The latter is a technique that allows you to continue an exercise with a lighter weight after your muscles have tapped out at a heavier weight. My rest, pause, drop methodology applied to a chest workout makes for absolute muscle-building brutality and is designed to train all your muscle fiber varieties at once.

Rest

Start with a weight you can do for 6-8 reps and go to failure (use a spotter). Rest for 5 seconds and then try for a couple of more.

Pause

Reduce the weight by 20-25 percent. Repeat what you just did, including the rest-pause, for 5 seconds.

Drop

Reduce the weight again—by the same amount you did last time—and repeat the rest-pause set one more time.

The final result is a 25-30 rep set. Beginners can do one set of this at the end of their chest workout, but I don’t recommend any more than that. Advanced lifters can include this RPD set with each exercise next Monday. (Everyone still does chest on Monday, right?)

7 Dust Off the Decline

You know that decline bench? The sloped brute that gathered a thick layer of dust from underuse? Well, this underrated angle can be a huge boon to your chest routine. It is approved by strongman Colton Leonard, who knows a thing or two about strong pecs.

Comparing exercises done on a flat bench versus a decline bench, some studies have shown that more muscle fibers in the pec are recruited while on the decline. Try this out with both a barbell and dumbbells.

Put these tips to the test and share your results with me and the rest of us in the comments below!

About The Author

Bodybuilding is the reason I am who I am today. I am more confident in myself, actually looking for the next challenge, and inspiring others.

Read article here:

7 Ways To Pump Up Your Chest

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, NutritionComments Off on 7 Ways To Pump Up Your Chest

Train like an Olympian!

London 2012 – remember that? Of course you do! As a nation we were swept up in two weeks of sporting triumphs and patriotism like never before and, two-and-a-half years on, it is those triumphs and star performances that still keep so many of us motivated to hit the gym or head out for a run. And now, thanks to Fitness First and its discovery that the desire to train like an Olympian was so prominent during the Games, its legacy looks likely to live on long into 2015 and beyond, too. The nationwide gym and health club chain has recently opened its doors to a brand new branch in London’s Bishopsgate with an athletic slant firmly in mind.

This amazing, state-of-the-art club boasts three new fitness programmes devised by Team GB athletes and coaches, and its new track, interactive Move studio and ceiling-mounted coaching camera are ideal for gym-goers who continue to be inspired by the athletes of 2012. The club even had its opening ribbons cut by three of Britain’s best young sports stars: Nicola Adams, the world’s first female boxing Olympic gold medallist; Ed Clancy, Olympic track cycling gold and bronze medallist; and Max Whitlock, Olympic gymnastics bronze medallist. 

But, of course, you don’t have to work out in the gym to train like an athlete (though if you live in London we definitely recommend a visit to the Bishopsgate club), so Fitness First has devised this fantastic workout that’ll boost your speed, power, agility and athleticism. You’ll be running faster than Usain Bolt in no time! (OK, we can’t quite promise that, but a girl can dream…)

How to do it

Perform the first move continuously for the time period allotted for your level. Rest for 15-30 seconds depending on your fitness level before moving on to the next. Once a full set of each move is complete, go back to the start to begin the next set, following the same structure.

Beginner: 5 x 30 seconds
Intermediate: 5 x 45 seconds
Advanced: 5 x 1 minute

Treadmills

Areas trained: hips, legs, core

Technique
-From plank position, bring your right foot up to the outside of your right hand, letting the hips drop. Keep your left leg straight and right leg bent.
-Jump to switch sides so that your right leg is straight and your left leg is bent with your left foot outside of your left hand.
-Continue to alternate for the allotted time for your level. 

Safety tip
Keep your head in a neutral position

Fast arms

Area trained: shoulders

Technique
-Stand in a stable position with legs slightly bent and back neutral.
-Position your arms as if you were to begin a sprint, with one slightly in front of the body and one behind, both bent.
-Switch positions so that the opposite arm is now in front instead.
-Repeat this as fast as you can continuously.

Safety tip
Keep your shoulders back and gaze forwards 

Lateral move + T press-up

Areas trained: Core, sides, chest, rear upper arms 

Technique
-Lie face down on the floor with arms extended out to the sides.
-Bring your hands to your sides under your shoulders, palms flat on the floor.
-Keeping your core tight and body in a straight line, push your body off the floor to complete a press-up.
-Rotate your torso to the side to bring one arm up to the ceiling, taking your gaze with it.
-Bring it back to the floor and bend your arms to lower yourself back to the ground to repeat, switching sides for the next rep. 

Safety tip
Don’t let your hips drop lower than the rest of your body 

Plyometric lunge

Areas trained: legs, bottom

Technique
-Take a large step forwards and bend both knees to about 90 degrees with your back knee just above the floor.
-Generate as much momentum as possible to jump as high as you can, switching the position of your legs mid-air to land with the opposite leg in front.
-Repeat fluidly. 

Safety tip
Keep your torso upright throughout

Isometric squat hold

Areas trained: thighs, bottom

Technique
-With your back resting against a wall, lower yourself until your knees are at a 90-degree angle, keeping feet flat on the floor.
-Hold. 

Safety tip
Keep your knees in line with your toes 

Press-up holds

Areas trained: core, chest, rear upper arms

Technique
-Start in plank position on your hands.
-Bend your arms to lower your chest to the floor, keeping your body in a straight line throughout.
-Push back up to the start.
-Without tilting your body, tap your left shoulder with your right hand.
-Lower, your hand back to the floor, then tap your right shoulder with your left hand.
-Return to the start and repeat.

Safety tip Keep your hips square throughout 

Sprinters

Areas trained: hips, legs

Technique
-Run on the spot as fast as you can, driving your knees high, for the allotted time for your level.

Safety tip Keep your back straight and shoulders back

See more here:  

Train like an Olympian!

Posted in Bodybuilding, Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight lossComments Off on Train like an Olympian!

<div class="article-padding-content" webReader="36.5487171655"><div class="article-author-by-line"><span class="byline">by <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/other.htm">Bodybuilding.com</a></span><span class="article-date">Apr 03, 2014</span></div><div id="DPG" webReader="30.9785322017"><h5 class="c7"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-day-38.html">Previous</a> | <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-main.html">Main</a> | <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-day-40.html">Next</a></h5><p>One of the most famous images of Arnold from the 1970s is of him performing a side chest pose, looking with an uncharacteristically serious, scrutinizing glare at the camera—or at least it seems like he's looking at the camera. Training partner Ed Corney recalled the real origin of the image in an interview with Bodybuilding.com:</p><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/arnold-blueprint_day39_graphics-1.jpg" width="261" height="358" border="0" class="float-right c8"/><p>"When Arnold was doing his side chest, they shot that by cutting a hole in the mirror he was looking at and putting a camera behind that hole. So they got him right on." Corney said. "Arnold would be looking at the mirror as a guide doing his side chest pose and they captured that."</p><p>The bodybuilder gazing at himself in the mirror is a stereotype that other gym-goers love to deride, but Arnold knew the true value of this technique more than anyone. Look again at that image; he isn't gazing at himself out of vanity.</p><p>"For a guy like Arnold, a mirror is a tool for self-criticism," writes Joe Weider in his autobiography "Brothers of Iron." "Looking at himself, a serious bodybuilder isn't admiring. He's looking for trouble. And he sees trouble, every time."</p><p>You've now survived a dozen difficult chest and back days in the Blueprint. Today when you're done, stop for a moment to take stock of progress you've made. Then get back to work.</p><div id="meal-plan-table"><ul webReader="2.7496328928"><li class="c6" webReader="10">
<p><strong>Technique: Stripping Method</strong><br />Immediately after your final working set, take some weight off and lift for another 5-10 reps. Then, with no rest, keep repeating this process. Reduce your weight, lift, reduce again, lift, and continue until you're down to the bar. Once you're down to the bar, lift for 20 reps.</p>
<br /></li>
<li class="rowBgColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-incline-bench-press-medium-grip')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/369/Male/t/369_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Incline Bench Press - Medium Grip" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-incline-bench-press-medium-grip')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/369/Male/t/369_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Incline Bench Press - Medium Grip" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-incline-bench-press-medium-grip')">Incline Barbell Bench Press</a></strong><br />10 sets of 4 reps<br />Use the stripping method on your final set</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-bench-press-medium-grip')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/360/Male/t/360_1.jpg" alt="Barbell Bench Press - Medium Grip" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('barbell-bench-press-medium-grip')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/360/Male/t/360_2.jpg" alt="Barbell Bench Press - Medium Grip" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('barbell-bench-press-medium-grip')">Flat Barbell Bench Press</a></strong><br />5 sets of 6 reps</span></li>
<li class="c6">
<h6>Superset</h6>
</li>
<li class="rowBgColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('dumbbell-flyes')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/12/Male/t/12_1.jpg" alt="Dumbbell Flyes" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('dumbbell-flyes')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/12/Male/t/12_2.jpg" alt="Dumbbell Flyes" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('dumbbell-flyes')">Dumbbell Flyes</a></strong><br />5 sets of 12 reps</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('cable-crossover')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/132/Male/t/132_1.jpg" alt="Cable Crossover" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('cable-crossover')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/132/Male/t/132_2.jpg" alt="Cable Crossover" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('cable-crossover')">Cable Crossover</a></strong><br />5 sets of 12 reps</span></li>
<li class="rowBgColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('chin-up')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/129/Male/t/129_1.jpg" alt="Chin-Up" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('chin-up')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/129/Male/t/129_2.jpg" alt="Chin-Up" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('chin-up')">Wide-Grip Chin-Up</a></strong><br />50 Total Reps<br />Use weight if needed.</span></li>
<li class="c6">
<h6>Superset</h6>
</li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('bent-over-two-dumbbell-row')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/16/Male/t/16_1.jpg" alt="Bent Over Two-Dumbbell Row" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('bent-over-two-dumbbell-row')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/16/Male/t/16_2.jpg" alt="Bent Over Two-Dumbbell Row" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('bent-over-two-dumbbell-row')">Bent-Over Dumbbell Rows</a></strong><br />8 sets of 8 reps</span></li>
<li class="rowBgColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('bent-over-two-arm-long-bar-row')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/18/Male/t/18_1.jpg" alt="Bent Over Two-Arm Long Bar Row" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('bent-over-two-arm-long-bar-row')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/18/Male/t/18_2.jpg" alt="Bent Over Two-Arm Long Bar Row" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('bent-over-two-arm-long-bar-row')">T-Bar Row</a></strong><br />8 sets of 8 reps</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c9"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('hanging-leg-raise')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/222/Male/t/222_1.jpg" alt="Hanging Leg Raise" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('hanging-leg-raise')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/222/Male/t/222_2.jpg" alt="Hanging Leg Raise" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('hanging-leg-raise')">Hanging Leg Raise</a></strong><br />5 sets of 25 reps</span></li>
</ul></div><br /><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/arnold-schwarzenegger-series/blueprint-to-mass-stack.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/arnold-blueprint_stack_bannerbig-b.jpg" width="560" height="360" class="c10"/></a><h5 class="c7"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-day-38.html">Previous</a> | <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-main.html">Main</a> | <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-day-40.html">Next</a></h5><br class="c11"/></div><div class="padded-content article-content mod-article-related-articles" id="article-related-articles"><h4 class="article-section-header">Related Articles</h4><div class="gray-gradient-box-with-border no-top-border"><ul class="related-article-list"><li class="first-related-article"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/targeted-ab-training-top-5-moves-for-your-core.html">Targeted Ab Training: Top 5 Moves For Your Core</a></li>
<li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/evolution-of-flex-episode-1-arnold-classic-prep-back-workout.html">Evolution Of Flex, Episode 1: Arnold Classic Preparations And Back Workout</a></li>
<li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/arnold-schwarzenegger-blueprint-trainer-main.html">Arnold Schwarzenegger Blueprint Trainer: Main Page</a></li>
</ul></div><div class="article-related-view-all"><ul class="bb-chevron-list bold-type"><li><a class="bold-type" href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bbinfo.php?page=WorkoutPrograms">View All Workout Programs Articles</a></li>
</ul></div></div><div class="padded-content article-content mod-about-the-author" id="article-about-author" webReader="33.1219512195"><h4 class="article-section-header">About The Author</h4><div class="ata-left-column" webReader="4.85087719298"><div class="ata-author-name"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/other.htm">Contributing Writer</a></div><div class="author-gradient-button"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/other.htm">VIEW AUTHOR PAGE</a></div><p class="ata-author-summary">Check out these awesome articles by some of the best writers in the industry.</p></div><div class="ata-right-column"><div class="ata-author-image-frame"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/other.htm"><img src="images/2013/writer-contributing-writers-sig-new.jpg" alt=""/></a></div><div class="ata-view-all-articles-link"><ul class="bb-chevron-list bold-type"><li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/other.htm#articles" class="bold-type">View All Articles By This Author</a></li>
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Arnold Schwarzenegger Blueprint Trainer Day 39

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One of the most famous images of Arnold from the 1970s is of him performing a side chest pose, looking with an uncharacteristically serious, scrutinizing glare at the camera—or at least it seems like he’s looking at the camera. Training partner Ed Corney recalled the real origin of the image in an interview with Bodybuilding.com:

“When Arnold was doing his side chest, they shot that by cutting a hole in the mirror he was looking at and putting a camera behind that hole. So they got him right on.” Corney said. “Arnold would be looking at the mirror as a guide doing his side chest pose and they captured that.”

The bodybuilder gazing at himself in the mirror is a stereotype that other gym-goers love to deride, but Arnold knew the true value of this technique more than anyone. Look again at that image; he isn’t gazing at himself out of vanity.

“For a guy like Arnold, a mirror is a tool for self-criticism,” writes Joe Weider in his autobiography “Brothers of Iron.” “Looking at himself, a serious bodybuilder isn’t admiring. He’s looking for trouble. And he sees trouble, every time.”

You’ve now survived a dozen difficult chest and back days in the Blueprint. Today when you’re done, stop for a moment to take stock of progress you’ve made. Then get back to work.

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Arnold Schwarzenegger Blueprint Trainer Day 39

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, NutritionComments Off on Arnold Schwarzenegger Blueprint Trainer Day 39

Paige Hathaway

2 hours 22 minutes ago

If kissing burns 6 calories per minute....
How many calories do you think laughing burns? 🤔

Paige Hathaway

6 hours 42 minutes ago

Hey everyone, really excited to announce I am going to be in the Middle East @dubaimuscleshow on from December 8th - 9th at the Dubai World Trade Centre. Really excited to see all of you, first time ever in Dubai and the first time I am meeting all my Middle Eastern fans.
I can’t wait! 😁 Get your tickets now !!

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