Tag Archive | "workout"

wf-dumbbells

Train and gain! with this dumbbell workout

Here’s how strength training can get you a better bikini body…

More and more women are strength training when they hit the gym, but if you’re still not convinced, then you could be missing out on some serious benefits.

Whether you’re using the TRX, doing a kettlebell class or using a pair of dumbbells in your HIIT circuit – you are strength training! It’s not all about weightlifting belts, clouds of chalk and groaning as loud as you can – though, that’s all welcome, too! It is, however, about using weights that truly challenge you, promoting muscle growth that in turn elevates your fat burn. The result is a leaner you, with a higher metabolic rate throughout the day.

‘It’s estimated that for every half a kilo of lean muscle you gain, your body will burn 35-50 extra calories each day just to maintain it,’ explains John Shepherd, author of new book Strength Training for Women. ‘Regular cardio exercisers may lose weight but end up with a body that lacks tone and holds fat around key “problem” areas, such as the abdomen and hips.’ But those aren’t the only benefits you’ll experience – that’s just the beginning.

‘Resistance training will also boost your hormones,’ explains John. Basically, the more you pick up the weights, the more your levels of growth hormone are elevated. Why is this desirable? Well, along with playing a vital role in shedding fat, growth hormone also helps to slow the effects of ageing, according to John. Who wouldn’t want that? As we age we also experience a higher risk of osteoporosis, and strength training is an effective way of combating this. Not only do weights build muscle but they strengthen your bones, too, which is ideal for overall health as well as preventing injury.

Strength training also challenges your body in all different planes of motion, boosting its ability to master complex moves – especially ones that’ll help you in everyday life. We’re talking lifting, carrying, picking things up – that’s why it’s considered functional fitness.

Don’t know where to start? John’s book is a great place, but if you want a taster, check out this workout he put together. It’s suitable for all levels, targeting the whole body using compound exercises. ‘These moves work numerous joints,’ explains John, ‘making them more functional and calorie-burning.’ Always use weights that prove difficult in the final reps of each set without compromising form – but if you’re new to weights, start out light and focus on building strength and technique. Everyone should add weights each month to encourage progress.

HOW TO DO IT

Always warm up before and cool down after this workout. Do each of the two workouts once a week, leaving at least 48 hours between each.

Workout 1: Metabolic and hormonal booster

Perform 3 x 10 reps of each move. Take enough recovery to allow for each set to be completed optimally.

Workout 2: Pyramid with body shaping fast-twitch fibre emphasis

Perform 8 reps using a light weight, 6 using a medium weight, then 2 x 4 reps using a heavy weight.

Workout 1

 Rear foot elevated split squat

Areas trained: glutes, hamstrings, quads, calves

Technique

  1. Holding dumbbells by each side, stand in front of a bench and place the toes of your rear foot on it. Hop your standing leg forward and place your foot flat on the floor. This is your starting position.
  2. Keeping your trunk upright and looking straight ahead, bend your front leg to lower your body to the ground. Lower until your thigh is approximately  parallel to the ground. 
  3. Push back up strongly and repeat. Perform the allotted reps on one side, and then the other to complete a full set.

Seated shoulder press

Areas trained: shoulders, triceps

Technique

  1. Sit on a bench holding dumbbells in front of your shoulders.
  2. Press the dumbbells up to the ceiling, bringing them close together at the top of the movement.
  3. Lower under control and repeat.

Single-arm kettlebell swing

Areas trained: quads, hamstrings, glutes, core, back, shoulders

Technique

  1. Take hold of the kettlebell in one hand with your knuckles facing away from you. Stand with your feet just beyond shoulder-width apart. Let the kettlebell hang down at arm-length in front of your body and let it drop down and through your legs.
  2. Move with the fall of the kettlebell and let your bottom move backwards and torso incline forwards with knees soft. As the momentum of the weight begins to stall and go in the other direction, ‘snap’ your hips to impart more momentum onto the kettlebell to drive it up again.
  3. Let the weight fall back down and repeat. Perform the allotted reps on both sides to complete a set.

Plié squat

Areas trained: glutes, hips, hamstrings, quads, calves

Technique 

  1. Holding the dumbbells with your knuckles facing away from you in front of your hips, stand with your feet wider than shoulder-width and turned out, making sure that your feet and knees are similarly angled.
  2. Bend your legs to plié and then extend them to stand back up and repeat.

 

Workout 2

Clean

Areas trained: back, shoulders, glutes, hamstrings, quads, calves

Technique

  1. Take hold of a barbell from the floor with your knuckles facing forwards and hands just further than shoulder-width apart. Keep your heels on the floor, arms extended and head up.
  2. Drive up to lift the bar from the floor, keeping your shoulders over it and your knees bent.
  3. As the bar approaches hip-level, drive your hips forwards and now pull on the bar with your arms. As you do this, switch your grip from overhand to underhand and ‘catch’ the bar in a racked position on the front of your shoulders.
  4. Keeping your back flat, control the bar down to the floor, bending your knees and folding forwards, first to your thighs and then to the floor.

Squat

Areas trained: glutes, quads, hamstrings, back

Technique

  1. Support a barbell across the fleshy rear part of your shoulders (avoiding contact with your top vertebrae). Pull the bar down onto your shoulders to
  2. fix it in place. Keep your head up and maintain the natural curve of your spine.
  3. Bend your knees to lower the weight as far as your flexibility allows. Keep your knees behind your toes as you go.
  4. Push through your heels to stand up and repeat.

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Medicine ball workout

Complete this routine as a timed circuit or do five rounds (20 reps each exercise).

The gist:

A medicine ball is a weighted ball roughly about 35 centimetres in diameter, and comes in a variety of weights from one kg to 11 kg. They are inexpensive, and available in hard plastic, dense rubber or synthetic leather material.

Medicine balls add a twist to your current workout to keep it challenging enough to elicit progress. This workout is designed to improve your overall athletic performance, firm up your core, and increase your muscular power and stamina. Use of the medicine ball will also help improve your coordination, balance and flexibility.

The kit:

You will need a timer and a medicine ball for this full-body workout. Refer to the workout chart. This four-week circuit-style workout will keep you on your toes, and your heart rate going!

The list: 

The workout comprises six exercises that target all areas of the body. Start with the first exercise, complete as many reps as you can within the recommended amount of work time (see chart), rest for the recommended amount, then continue on to the next exercise. Repeat until all of the exercises are done. As the week’s progress, the circuit gets more challenging. Record your results so you can properly keep track of your progress.

For Weeks 1–2:

Once all of the exercises in the circuit are complete, rest 90 seconds, and repeat the entire circuit two more times.

For Week 3: 

Once all of the exercises in the circuit are complete, rest 60 seconds, and repeat the entire circuit two more times. 

For Week 4: 

Once all of the exercises in the circuit are complete, rest 60 seconds, and repeat the entire circuit three more times. 

Tip: For beginners, use a lighter weight medicine ball. For an extra challenge and to increase your power, use a heavier ball.

teresaworkout.jpg

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Medicine ball workout

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Weight loss tips for women

Weight loss tips for women

Article
Use these tips to put your fat loss in the fast lane

1 Do compound exercises
Working your bigger muscle groups and performing exercises that target several areas of your body at once ensures a higher fat burn, as you will be recruiting more muscle mass.

2 Focus on tempo
Don’t rush through the lowering part of an exercise. By putting your muscles under tension, rather than allowing gravity to do the work, you’re forcing them to build. Building muscle helps to speed your metabolism – and burn fat!

3 Don’t rest for too long
Of course you need time to recover (it’s important to rest so you can make the next set count!), but only take short breaks between sets to keep your heart rate up and ensure the workout hits the right intensity.

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Weight loss tips for women

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Image fullbodycircuit-nichelle-dumbbellsinglearm.jpg

4-week full body circuit by Nichelle Laus

Work up a sweat, tone and sculpt with this four-week total body workout by WH&F trainer Nichelle Laus.The workout:The following circuit can be performed three days per week, on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.On the other days between (Tuesday and Thursday) perform moderate cardio for 20 minutes.Week 1: Perform 2–3 sets of the circuit with 1 minute in between exercises.Week 2: Perform 3–4 sets of the circuit with 1 minute in between exercises.Week 3: Perform 3–4 sets of the circuit with 30 seconds in between exercises.Week 4: Perform 3–4 sets of the circuit with as little time as possible between exercises.1. Dumbbel single arm split squat to pressPerform 8 reps per legAssume a split squat position with your left foot forward. Hold a moderately weighted dumbbell in your right hand. Hold the dumbbell at the height of your right shoulder and brace your core as you descend into the split squat

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4-week full body circuit by Nichelle Laus

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tiffhall

Health and fitness with Tiffiny Hall

 

ON THE MEANING OF FITNESS:

The meaning of fitness for me is, well, fitness with meaning. You have to train with purpose. W eight loss and changing body shape isn’t enough because weight comes and goes and body parts come in and out of fashion, like round bums. The deeper the meaning, the more powerful the motivation. For me, I train to be healthy, to live longer, to be the best I can be for my husband, to keep mentally and emotionally well and balanced and now that I’m at the age where I’m starting to think about kids, I’m training to be fit for pregnancy.

ON HEALTH AND FITNESS MISTAKES

I’ve tried every fad diet out there. I’ve experimented on my body in so many ways, always seeking the magic fix that I could pass on to my students or clients, but diet after diet, I was always let down. Nothing works, except hard work. All my years in health and fitness tell me the key is to train the mind and the mind will train the body. Trying to remedy the body first never works, or it may work but only short term. I see so many women hating themselves, hating themselves slimmer, punishing themselves, feeling guilty. I’ve learned that you can’t hate yourself healthy, you have to love yourself healthier. Self-love is sustainable, self-loathing is not. It’s only when I began to truly accept myself, respect myself and ditch the diets that I’ve found consistency, balance and inner harmony. That’s why I love the kiss and the hug, and created TIFFXO. Embracing self-love will heal and transform you. It’s about throwing out the all-or-nothing attitude, and the toxic thought patterns of ‘I’ll be happy when I reach…’, ‘I don’t deserve this’. Learn to give yourself a cuddle, forgive and move forward.

ON FITNESS/HEALTH/NUTRITION MYTHS

Food fashion, fads, myths – I’ve just had it with them! My clients always say to me, “But I’ve tried everything.”

My response is always, “Have you tried one thing consistently, for 30 days?”

There is no magic. The magic is in you. Own your power, eat well, train consistently and have fun doing it and learn to zen. If you do this every day, your body will thank you and be in the best shape of its life! You are the gift to your body. We have to stop seeking outward illusions and realise that the power is in us.

ON WORKOUT MOTIVATION

There are tricks that can help us find our mojo, but what makes motivation stick is creating a habit, just like taking a shower or a good probiotic every single day. Some days you feel it – hell, yeah! Some days you don’t – ah, well it has to be done anyway because you know you will feel phenomenal afterwards, and nobody has ever regretted a healthy meal or a workout. So for 30 days stick to something, give it meaning, make it realistic and be disciplined (sorry to use that boring word but it really does work). Motivation will get you there, but habits keep you going. I train every single day in some way, be it a stretch session or taekwondo, HIIT or tone…every day I move because I feel emotionally and mentally better for it.

Read Tiffiny’s full cover story in the January 2017 edition of Women’s Health and Fitness Magazine.

In need of some more inspiraiton? Head to our motivational section for more. 

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4 HIIT workouts to try now

4 HIIT workouts to try now So you want to be one of those super-fit (and perky) people? Set a goal and time frame and train using these HIIT workouts.

High-intensity interval training (HIIT) involves alternating short periods of intense anaerobic exercise with active recovery sessions. These short, intense workouts burn high levels of calories and improve athletic capacity.

How: Try the following routine over two to four weeks and complete two times per week. Make sure you record whether you reached the program goal or not. 

a.Workout 1: Incline sprints (lvl 35)
30-second maximal output then drop incline and actively recover for 2 min x 5 sets

b. Workout 2: Incline sprints (lvl 35)
45-second maximal output then drop incline and actively recover for 2 min x 5 sets

c.Workout 3: incline sprints (lvl 35)
45-second maximal output, drop incline and actively recover for 1.5 min x 5 sets

d. Workout 4: Incline sprints (lvl 35)
45-second maximal output, drop the incline and actively recover for 1 min x 5 sets

Insider’s tip: Try this instead of long steady-state cardio sessions and watch your fitness levels soar!

 

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4 HIIT workouts to try now

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<div id="DPG" webReader="126.131470308"><div class="side-bar" webReader="-16.5731707317"><div class="c10"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/al-kavadlo-vital-stats.jpg"/></div><h3 class="article-title c11">Vital Stats</h3><a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/AlKavadlo/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Bodyspace"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/bodyspace-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c12"/></a><a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/AlKavadlocom-Were-working-out/205151489148" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Facebook"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/facebook-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c13"/></a><a href="https://twitter.com/AlKavadlo" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Twitter"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/twitter-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c13"/></a><a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/alkavadlo" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="YouTube"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/youtube-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c13"/></a><p><strong>Name:</strong> Al Kavadlo, CSCS<br /><strong>Location:</strong> New York, NY<br /><strong>Occupation:</strong> Trainer, author, lead instructor of Progressive Calisthenics Certification<br /><strong>Website:</strong> <a href="www.alkavadlo.com" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">alkavadlo.com</a></p></div><p>It's become a common cliché that bodyweight athletes don't have strong legs. Look at the comments on any YouTube clip showcasing advanced calisthenics, and you're bound to see someone hating on the lack of lower-body development. A number of coaches also insist that it's impossible to build a strong, powerful lower body without external weights.</p><p>Balderdash, I say! Bodyweight exercises alone can make you every bit as strong as can barbells and dumbbells. You just need to push yourself and get a little creative.</p><p>While newcomers need to spend some time honing their bodyweight squats and lunges, it usually doesn't take long for these basic exercises to max out on their strength benefits. Once this occurs, however, adding weight is not the only solution; you can continue to build strength by simply progressing to more difficult bodyweight exercises, like I discuss in my book <a href="http://www.dragondoor.com/b69/?apid=4e8cb1ea167b0" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Pushing The Limits</a>.</p><p>Ultimately, I recommend working up to single-leg movements like the <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/pistol-perfect-one-legged-squats-and-beyond.html" target="_blank">pistol squat</a> to get the most out of calisthenics leg training. However, these types of advanced movements may remain out of reach until you've built more strength. As an intermediate step, jump training can add a challenge to your lower-body workouts without the need for weights or equipment. And even if you're well-versed in pistol squats, some of these simple exercises may offer you a new challenge and a welcomed change of pace.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">1 Jump Squat</h3>
</p><p>A jump squat is like a regular bodyweight squat, except instead of simply standing up at the top of your range of motion, you jump as high as you can, lifting your knees toward your chest at the top. You can do them jumping in place or up onto an object.</p><p>Though your legs obviously do most of the work, jump squats are a full-body exercise, so use your arms to generate momentum. Remember to stay light on your feet and avoid landing with your knees locked. Keep your joints relaxed and do your best to absorb the impact as gently as possible.</p><p>Try to go directly from one jump into the next, taking advantage of the elasticity of your muscles and their stretch reflex. If you're not able to do this at first, however, just reset and take a few seconds between reps as needed.</p><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/jump-training-the-4-move-no-equipment-leg-workout-1.jpg" width="560" height="593" border="0"/><p>"Though your legs obviously do most of the work, jump squats are a full-body exercise, so use your arms to generate momentum."</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">2 Broad Jump</h3>
</p><p>Another fun plyometric squat variant, the broad jump is essentially the same as the jump squat except you jump forward, not upward. You still want to lift your legs high as you jump, however; this will help you clear more distance. Leaving your legs dangling isn't as aerodynamic. You'll need a lot of space to practice broad jumps; I recommend a park or field.</p><p>Again, try to go from one rep right into the next, though feel free to take a few seconds between reps if you need to when starting out.</p><img class="float-right c15" src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/jump-training-the-4-move-no-equipment-leg-workout-2.jpg" width="276" height="377" border="0"/><p>"Lunges are one of my favorite leg exercises, but like anything else, they need to be progressed once they cease to be a challenge."</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">3 Jump Lunge</h3>
</p><p>Lunges are one of my favorite leg exercises, but like anything else, they need to be progressed once they cease to be a challenge.</p><p>Start out with a stationary jump lunge by lowering yourself down into a split squat and jumping up at the top, gently landing back into the bottom position with your knees bent. Do several in a row, and <em>then</em> switch legs.</p><p>When you get comfortable with those, the cycle lunge is a more advanced jump lunge worth trying. It starts out the same as the stationary jump lunge, but once you're in the air, you'll have to quickly switch your legs before landing. Continue to alternate legs with each rep, going from one right into the next. Feel free to swing your arms for momentum or keep them at your sides. It might take a little practice to land comfortably without losing your balance.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c14">4 Sprinting</h3>
</p><p>Though often overlooked, running is arguably the most natural and fundamental of all lower-body calisthenics exercises. Though most people associate running with long-distance cardio training, sprinting turns up the intensity to such a degree that the body's response is more like performing a heavy set of barbell squats than jogging a 10K. Yes, you can actually <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ask-the-muscle-prof-best-cardio-for-preserving-mass.html" target="_blank">build strength and muscle through sprinting</a>!</p><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/jump-training-the-4-move-no-equipment-leg-workout-3.jpg" width="560" height="353" border="0"/><p>"The body's response to sprinting is more like performing a heavy set of barbell squats than jogging a 10K."</p><p>Remember that when you sprint, both of your feet are often in the air at the same time, so sprinting is pretty much a form of jump training. You can do sprints for time or for distance, but either way, keep them brief and intense for the most strength benefits.</p><p>Here's a simple routine that can be done anytime to help you find your footing in jump training.</p><div id="meal-plan-table" webReader="-14.96812749"><p>Perform all exercises consecutively, with 1-2 minutes rest between each set.</p><ul><li class="rowBgColor c17"><span class="mpt-images"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/649/Male/t/649_1.jpg" alt="Warm-Up" width="53" height="53"/><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/649/Male/t/649_2.jpg" alt="Warm-Up" width="53" height="53"/></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong>Warm-Up</strong><br />Light jogging or jumping jacks for around 5 minutes</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c17"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('freehand-jump-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/108/Female/t/108_1.jpg" alt="Jump Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('freehand-jump-squat')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/108/Female/t/108_2.jpg" alt="Jump Squat" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('freehand-jump-squat')">Jump Squat</a></strong><br />2 sets of 10 reps</span></li>
<li class="rowBgColor c17"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('standing-long-jump')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/831/Male/t/831_1.jpg" alt="Broad Jump" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('standing-long-jump')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/831/Male/t/831_2.jpg" alt="Broad Jump" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('standing-long-jump')">Broad Jump</a></strong><br />2 sets of 5 reps</span></li>
<li class="rowBorderColor c17"><span class="mpt-images"><a href="javascript:pop('scissors-jump')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/813/Female/t/813_1.jpg" alt="Jump Lunge" width="53" height="53"/></a> <a href="javascript:pop('scissors-jump')"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/exerciseImages/sequences/813/Female/t/813_2.jpg" alt="Jump Lunge" width="53" height="53"/></a></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong><a href="javascript:pop('scissors-jump')">Jump Lunge</a></strong><br />2 sets of 10 reps</span></li>
<li class="rowBgColor c17"><span class="mpt-images"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2012/sprints_115x53.jpg" alt="Sprints" width="115" height="53"/></span> <span class="mpt-content content"><strong>Sprints</strong><br />2 sets of 10 seconds</span></li>
</ul></div><p>There is no single strength building method that's guaranteed to work best for everybody. Weight training will forever have its place in strength and conditioning, but there will always be alternative options to help build athleticism outside of the traditional weight room setting. Bodyweight workouts are often the most practical means of getting a quick but effective workout when you've got a busy schedule and/or don't belong to a gym.</p><p>Give the workout above a shot. I promise it will leave your quads aching and your hamstrings hammered.</p><a href="http://www.dragondoor.com/b73/?apid=4e8cb1ea167b0" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/al-kavadlo-streetching-your-boundaries-book-banner.jpg" width="560" height="144" class="c18"/></a><br class="c19"/><h3 class="article-title">Recommended For You</h3><div class="c22" webReader="6.20408163265"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/pistol-perfect-one-legged-squats-and-beyond.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/pistol-squats-and-beyond-smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c21" webReader="8.5306122449"><h4 class="c20"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/pistol-perfect-one-legged-squats-and-beyond.html">Pistol Perfect: One-Legged Squats And Beyond</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Pistol squats pop up all over the place, but that doesn't make this classic movement any easier. Commit, do the work, and let Al Kavadlo be your guide!</p></div></div><div class="c22" webReader="4.91048034934"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bodyweight-bust-four-bodyweight-training-myths-debunked.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/4-bodyweight-myths-debunked-smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c21" webReader="6.04366812227"><h4 class="c20"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bodyweight-bust-four-bodyweight-training-myths-debunked.html">Bodyweight Bust! Four Bodyweight Training Myths Debunked</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Don't believe that high-level calisthenics are only for athletes who look a certain way. Everyone can benefit from the unique challenges that come with bodyweight training!</p></div></div><div class="c22" webReader="4.81463414634"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ask-the-muscle-prof-best-cardio-for-preserving-mass.html"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/ask-the-muscle-prof-smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c21" webReader="6.19024390244"><h4 class="c20"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ask-the-muscle-prof-best-cardio-for-preserving-mass.html">Ask The Muscle Prof: What's The Best Cardio For Preserving Mass?</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
You've heard the benefits of high-intensity cardio for weight loss, but you're concerned it'll cost you hard-earned muscle. Learn the truth!</p></div></div></div><div class="padded-content article-content mod-about-the-author" id="article-about-author" webReader="37.5957446809"><h4 class="article-section-header">About The Author</h4><div class="ata-left-column" webReader="6.91304347826"><div class="ata-author-name"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/al-kavadlo.html">Al Kavadlo, CSCS</a></div><div class="author-gradient-button"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/al-kavadlo.html">VIEW AUTHOR PAGE</a></div><p class="ata-author-summary">Al Kavadlo, CSCS is one of the world's leading experts in bodyweight strength training and calisthenics.</p></div><div class="ata-right-column"><div class="ata-author-image-frame"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/al-kavadlo.html"><img src="images/2013/writer-al-kavadlo-sig-new.jpg" alt=""/></a></div><div class="ata-view-all-articles-link"><ul class="bb-chevron-list bold-type"><li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/al-kavadlo.html#articles" class="bold-type">View All Articles By This Author</a></li>
</ul></div></div></div>

Jump Training: The 4-Move No Equipment Leg Workout

 

It’s become a common cliché that bodyweight athletes don’t have strong legs. Look at the comments on any YouTube clip showcasing advanced calisthenics, and you’re bound to see someone hating on the lack of lower-body development. A number of coaches also insist that it’s impossible to build a strong, powerful lower body without external weights.

Balderdash, I say! Bodyweight exercises alone can make you every bit as strong as can barbells and dumbbells. You just need to push yourself and get a little creative.

While newcomers need to spend some time honing their bodyweight squats and lunges, it usually doesn’t take long for these basic exercises to max out on their strength benefits. Once this occurs, however, adding weight is not the only solution; you can continue to build strength by simply progressing to more difficult bodyweight exercises, like I discuss in my book Pushing The Limits.

Ultimately, I recommend working up to single-leg movements like the pistol squat to get the most out of calisthenics leg training. However, these types of advanced movements may remain out of reach until you’ve built more strength. As an intermediate step, jump training can add a challenge to your lower-body workouts without the need for weights or equipment. And even if you’re well-versed in pistol squats, some of these simple exercises may offer you a new challenge and a welcomed change of pace.

1 Jump Squat

A jump squat is like a regular bodyweight squat, except instead of simply standing up at the top of your range of motion, you jump as high as you can, lifting your knees toward your chest at the top. You can do them jumping in place or up onto an object.

Though your legs obviously do most of the work, jump squats are a full-body exercise, so use your arms to generate momentum. Remember to stay light on your feet and avoid landing with your knees locked. Keep your joints relaxed and do your best to absorb the impact as gently as possible.

Try to go directly from one jump into the next, taking advantage of the elasticity of your muscles and their stretch reflex. If you’re not able to do this at first, however, just reset and take a few seconds between reps as needed.

“Though your legs obviously do most of the work, jump squats are a full-body exercise, so use your arms to generate momentum.”

2 Broad Jump

Another fun plyometric squat variant, the broad jump is essentially the same as the jump squat except you jump forward, not upward. You still want to lift your legs high as you jump, however; this will help you clear more distance. Leaving your legs dangling isn’t as aerodynamic. You’ll need a lot of space to practice broad jumps; I recommend a park or field.

Again, try to go from one rep right into the next, though feel free to take a few seconds between reps if you need to when starting out.

“Lunges are one of my favorite leg exercises, but like anything else, they need to be progressed once they cease to be a challenge.”

3 Jump Lunge

Lunges are one of my favorite leg exercises, but like anything else, they need to be progressed once they cease to be a challenge.

Start out with a stationary jump lunge by lowering yourself down into a split squat and jumping up at the top, gently landing back into the bottom position with your knees bent. Do several in a row, and then switch legs.

When you get comfortable with those, the cycle lunge is a more advanced jump lunge worth trying. It starts out the same as the stationary jump lunge, but once you’re in the air, you’ll have to quickly switch your legs before landing. Continue to alternate legs with each rep, going from one right into the next. Feel free to swing your arms for momentum or keep them at your sides. It might take a little practice to land comfortably without losing your balance.

4 Sprinting

Though often overlooked, running is arguably the most natural and fundamental of all lower-body calisthenics exercises. Though most people associate running with long-distance cardio training, sprinting turns up the intensity to such a degree that the body’s response is more like performing a heavy set of barbell squats than jogging a 10K. Yes, you can actually build strength and muscle through sprinting!

“The body’s response to sprinting is more like performing a heavy set of barbell squats than jogging a 10K.”

Remember that when you sprint, both of your feet are often in the air at the same time, so sprinting is pretty much a form of jump training. You can do sprints for time or for distance, but either way, keep them brief and intense for the most strength benefits.

Here’s a simple routine that can be done anytime to help you find your footing in jump training.

Perform all exercises consecutively, with 1-2 minutes rest between each set.

  • Warm-UpWarm-Up Warm-Up
    Light jogging or jumping jacks for around 5 minutes
  • Jump Squat Jump Squat Jump Squat
    2 sets of 10 reps
  • Broad Jump Broad Jump Broad Jump
    2 sets of 5 reps
  • Jump Lunge Jump Lunge Jump Lunge
    2 sets of 10 reps
  • Sprints Sprints
    2 sets of 10 seconds

There is no single strength building method that’s guaranteed to work best for everybody. Weight training will forever have its place in strength and conditioning, but there will always be alternative options to help build athleticism outside of the traditional weight room setting. Bodyweight workouts are often the most practical means of getting a quick but effective workout when you’ve got a busy schedule and/or don’t belong to a gym.

Give the workout above a shot. I promise it will leave your quads aching and your hamstrings hammered.

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Pistol squats pop up all over the place, but that doesn’t make this classic movement any easier. Commit, do the work, and let Al Kavadlo be your guide!

Bodyweight Bust! Four Bodyweight Training Myths Debunked

Don’t believe that high-level calisthenics are only for athletes who look a certain way. Everyone can benefit from the unique challenges that come with bodyweight training!

Ask The Muscle Prof: What’s The Best Cardio For Preserving Mass?

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About The Author

Al Kavadlo, CSCS is one of the world’s leading experts in bodyweight strength training and calisthenics.

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Jump Training: The 4-Move No Equipment Leg Workout

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Warm up, Weight loss, Weight TrainingComments Off on Jump Training: The 4-Move No Equipment Leg Workout

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Full-Body Training: Twinlab Militia 30-Minute Workout

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This 30-minute Fuel Team Muscle Militia workout is heavy, intense, and will totally kick your ass. It will push you to utter failure on every major body part, and I’m not talking about mental failure. I’m talking about true physical failure—the point at which you can’t perform one more rep. This level of intensity will spark your muscles to grow while torching calories throughout.

This is the only workout I do. I’ve been on it for five months and I train almost every single day. It’s my cardio and my strength work. This workout has put me in my best-ever shape. At 45 years old, that’s where I want to be.

http://www.hustlestandard.com/robbailey/

Meet the Muscle Militia

Ronnie Milo

Occupation:
Sales rep, Twinlab
Athletic Goal:
Competitive bodybuilder

“I want to be proportionate, work on my weak spots, and make sure I give 100 percent in the gym.”

Jason Wheat

Occupation:
Firefighter, Florida
Athletic Goal:
Powerlifter, coming back from pec injury

“My goal is to compete in powerlifting again.”

Chris Thompson

Occupation: VP of Sports Nutrition, Twinlab
Athletic Goal:
Ripped physique

“I just want to be as strong, hard, and lean as I can be.”

Because it’s so versatile, I know this workout can improve any body type. You’re about to watch three different Muscle Militia athletes perform it: Ronnie Milo, a competitive bodybuilder; Jason Wheat, a powerlifter; and me, a physique athlete. We’re going to hit this workout together at the same rep range with different levels of resistance to show you exactly what I mean.

Total-Body Muscle Militia Training
Watch The Video – 11:11

Battle Breakdown

For this 30-minute workout, you’ll do approximately 2 sets of each exercise. You’ll do a quick warm-up set to prepare the muscle group, and then a high-intensity set to utter failure in the 8-15 rep range. Make sure to take the second set to total failure to get the absolute best results.

You’ll start the workout by hitting smaller muscle groups first. The exercise selection may seem strange, but we do this to safely prepare the body and joints for the heavier, compound exercises that come later.

As you begin, you may think this workout is easy, but trust me, it’ll get a lot harder as you go along. Those compound lifts will hit hard!

  • Seated Leg Tucks Seated Leg Tucks Bench Tucks
    1 set to failure
  • Standing Calf Raises Standing Calf Raises Calf Extension
    1 warm-up set of 8-15 reps
    1 working set of 8-15 reps to failure
  • Note(s): Warm-up sets are important because we’re going really heavy. Get those muscles warm before you work them hard.
  • Thigh Abductor Thigh Abductor Abductor Machine
    1 warm-up set of 8-15 reps
    1 working set of 8-15 reps to failure
  • Hyperextensions (Back Extensions) Hyperextensions (Back Extensions) Hyperextensions
    1 warm-up set of 8-15 reps
    1 working set of 8-15 reps to failure
  • Lying Leg Curls Lying Leg Curls Hamstring Curl
    1 warm-up set of 8-15 reps
    1 working set of 8-15 reps to failure
  • Leg Extensions Leg Extensions Leg Extensions
    1 warm-up set of 8-15 reps
    1 working set of 8-15 reps to failure
  • Squat Machine Squat Machine
    1 warm-up set of 8-15 reps
    1 working set of 8-15 reps to failure
  • Pullups Pullups Pullups
    1 warm-up set of 8-15 reps
    1 working set of 8-15 reps to failure
  • Seated Cable Rows Seated Cable Rows Seated Cable Rows
    1 warm-up set of 8-15 reps
    1 working set of 8-15 reps to failure
  • Side Lateral Raise Side Lateral Raise Dumbbell Lateral Raise
    1 warm-up set of 8-15 reps
    1 working set of 8-15 reps to failure
  • Dumbbell Bicep Curl Dumbbell Bicep Curl Dumbbell Bicep Curl
    1 warm-up set of 8-15 reps
    1 working set of 8-15 reps to failure
  • Barbell Bench Press - Medium Grip Barbell Bench Press - Medium Grip Barbell Bench Press – Medium Grip
    1 warm-up set of 8-15 reps
    1 working set of 8-15 reps to failure
  • Note(s): A couple of us have had significant shoulder injuries that we’re still rehabilitating, which is why we don’t perform full repetitions. If your shoulders are healthy, do full reps.
  • Dips - Triceps Version Dips - Triceps Version Weighted Dip
    1 warm-up set of 8-15 reps
    1 working set of 8-15 reps to failure

This workout is meant to challenge your cardiovascular fitness, so keep moving! I don’t have to do any additional cardio, at all. By moving through each exercise, one after another, you get 30 minutes of cardio along with that day’s resistance work.

If you have partners, make sure you’re always moving. For example, if your partner finishes a lift before you, have him or her move ahead and start the next exercise. Keep the intensity high, treat this workout like a war, and make sure you win.

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About The Author

Check out these awesome articles by some of the best writers in the industry.

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Full-Body Training: Twinlab Militia 30-Minute Workout

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, Sports nutritionComments Off on Full-Body Training: Twinlab Militia 30-Minute Workout

Image Plank-with-one-arm-row-nerissa-peach.jpg

Base Body Babes full-body barbell workout

Get stronger, fitter and feel more confident in the gym with this exclusive full-body workout by the Base Body Babes.”The barbell is our favourite piece of training equipment, as it can be used for such a great range of exercises. We like to say that ‘Load is King’ – the exercise that allows you to lift the heaviest loads will ultimately give you the best results, and the barbell allows you to do just that.

Although there is no magical number, we love the eight rep range as it allows you to build strength while still keeping the heart rate elevated for optimal calorie burn,” says the ladies, Felicia Oreb and Diana Johnson.Here’s what you need to do

A1 Barbell Back Squat

A2 Barbell Military Press

A3 Barbell Romanian Deadlift

A4 Barbell Bent-Over Row

A5 Barbell Split Squat

A6 Barbell Glute Bridges Perform each exercise

A1–A6 back to back, with no rest in between exercises

Complete 8 repetitions of each exercise Rest for 4 minutes after A6 Repeat 4–6 times NOTE: Choose weights that you believe you can complete all repetitions and sets with without failing, yet still keep the weight challenging enough to complete a great workout. Technique is most important when lifting heavy, so don’t compromise your form.

Ensure you are completing all repetitions and sets with perfect technique before increasing the weight.Let’s do this!Words/Workout: Felicia Oreb and Diana JohnsonPhotography: Vanessa Natoli / @vanesSanatoliphotography

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Base Body Babes full-body barbell workout
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Posted in Bodybuilding, ExercisesComments Off on Base Body Babes full-body barbell workout

Image Alexa-Overhead-Reverse-Lunge1.jpg

Dynamic warm up routine

Warm up your muscles with September cover model Alexa Towersey’s favourite warm up sequence.Alexa always incorporates a structured dynamic warm-up before every training session. It’s the perfect opportunity to prime the nervous system and prepare the muscles, reinforce correct movement patterns and identify and address any structural imbalances or weaknesses.

Learning how to switch ‘off’ the wrong muscles, and switch on the ‘right’ muscles, for the workout to come is the key to making your workouts more efficient and effective.

HOT TIPIf your hip flexors are tight, they can inhibit the glutes from firing, so you need to include a dynamic warm-up that focuses on opening up the hips first and then isolating and activating the glutes.Overhead Reverse Lunge x 10Step back into a reverse lunge, bringing the knee down to graze the ground as you reach your arms up and out of your hips towards the ceiling.

Source:
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Dynamic warm up routine

Posted in Bodybuilding, ExercisesComments Off on Dynamic warm up routine

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