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macros (1)

How to count macros

Step 1:

Adopt A Macros Ratio

Most experts who use macros suggest dividing the Big 3 macronutrients into these ratios:

»Protein: 35% or 40%

»Carbs: 50% or 40%

»Fats: 15% or 20%

Try this approach and then tweak to find what works best for you.

Step 2:

Set Your Kilojoule Intake

Work out how many kilojoules you need to maintain or lose weight, depending on your goal.

Step 3:

Calculate Grams 

»Carbs: 1 gram = roughly 16 kJ (4 calories)

»Protein: 1 gram = roughly 16 kJ (4 calories)

»Fats: 1 gram = roughly 37 kJ (9 calories)

Step 4:

Allocate macros

Work out roughly how you want to divvy your macros into meals over a day. “I usually suggest that the higher energy carbs are eaten earlier in the day,” says personal trainer Daniel Tramontana, from Vision Personal Training at Brighton, Victoria. “Then later you can eat carbs in the form of fibrous vegetables and salad foods. I encourage people to eat protein at every meal, based on their body weight, and to have their healthy fats in later meals to assist the absorption and conversion of the nutrients.”

Source:

How to count macros

Posted in Exercises, NutritionComments (0)

Sarah Storey’s cycling tips

Dame Sarah Storey DBE, 11 time Paralympic Gold Medallist and four-time Gold Medallist at the London 2012 Paralympic Games, shares her wisdom

If like H&F’s Emma Wall you have signed up to the London to Brighton Bike Ride to raise funds for The British Heart Foundation, these Olympic-worthy race tips will be invaluable.

Sarah says:

1. Get comfy! Saddle and bike comfort is very important as you will be pedalling for at least four hours to complete the ride. You need a good pair of shorts with a padded support and also need to make sure the balance of your weight on the bike between the handlebars, saddle and pedals is right. A good local bike shop will help you with all these things and ask them about buying “chamois cream” for your shorts, which is very important on long rides.

2. Pace yourself. This is important with your preparation for the event and the event itself. Gradually build up your miles on the bike during your preparation phase. During the ride itself remember this is not a race. You will finish strongly if you go a bit easier than you think you need to at the start.

3. Fuel correctly. Eating and drinking are both of the upmost important during a ride of this length and you may need to practice doing this on the bike. If not whilst moving, then remember to take plenty of short breaks to get the food and fluid inside you. Drinking before you a thirsty is very important and eating something small every half hour will stop you getting hunger pangs or worse still running out of energy altogether.

4. Always wear a helmet and do all your practice and preparation rides using the helmet too. It might well save your life one day.

5. Enjoy it! This is the most important part for whenever you get out on a bike. Enjoy the feeling of freedom, the fresh air and the beautiful English countryside.

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Sarah Storey’s cycling tips

Posted in Aerobics, Bodybuilding, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Training MethodsComments (0)



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Paige Hathaway

Paige Hathaway

18 hours 42 minutes ago

PEANUT BUTTER ENERGY BITES 🥜

INGREDIENTS
⅔ cup creamy peanut butter
½ cup semi-sweet chocolate chips
1 cup old fashioned oats
½ cup ground flax seeds
2 tablespoons honey

INSTRUCTIONS
Combine all 5 ingredients. Stir to combine. Place in the refrigerator for 15-30 minutes so they are easier to roll. Roll into 12 bites and store in the fridge for up to a week.

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