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cardiohiit

4 ways to increase fat loss

Progressively burn more fat with these top tips from personal trainer, Pilates instructor, and owner of KE Fitness Kris Etheridge.

Body fat is simply stored energy, so giving your body a reason to use it is vital. This can be done through diet or exercise, but most commonly a combination of the two.

“To lose body fat, you need to place your body into a calorie deficit, forcing it to use its fat for energy. Muscle is also your body’s engine – the bigger the engine, the more fuel it uses and the more calories you burn, making it easier to lose fat,” says Etheridge, who suggests any good fat loss plan contains gradual progressions in both fat-burning cardiovascular activity and resistance training.

“Strength training is the most important element; the amount of cardio you need to do to achieve fat loss depends on how strict you are with your diet and what kind of strength and conditioning program you’re doing,” he says.

“Utilise progressive overload to make your resistance workout more difficult than what you can comfortably perform in your current program. Whether it be using different training principals, such as supersets and circuits, or increasing the weight or reps, keep progressing by asking more from your body.”

Etheridge suggests increasing your weight, sets, reps or intensity each week for six weeks, followed by one week of lighter training (aka. a deload week) to allow the body to recover.

“Lighter weeks or rest weeks are imperative to minimise overtraining and reduce the chance of overuse injuries. This is the optimal way to increase your strength,” says Etheridge.

“For weight loss, it’s not as important to use progressions with your cardio. The cardio is purely for fat burning – but if you want to continue to improve your cardiovascular fitness, aim to increase your workout intensity by approximately five per cent each week for six weeks. Take a week off and then start your new program.”

Here are her top four tips:

1. Change your exercises from basic compound movements to compound movements that require a higher level of skill, coordination or strength. For example, single leg or unilateral work. Examples:think pistol squat, TRX suspended lunge, Bulgarian split squat, single-leg deadlift, squats and step-ups using a bosu ball; single arm work such as one arm dumbbell or chest press on a fitball, single arm rows or renegade rows.

2. Reduce rest periods. Depending on how much rest you’re currently having, aim to drop it by five per cent per week for six weeks, or until you’re only having approximately 40 seconds rest (if performing straight sets) and 20 seconds rest between exercises (if you’re performing a circuit).

3. Split your program up and focus on two to three muscles groups per workout rather than full body. This is a more advanced way of training and a great way to continue progressing. Splitting the body parts up means you can perform more volume (sets) on each muscle group in each workout, and workout more days each week while still allowing adequate recovery time.

4. Add plyometrics to your workouts. Plyometric training is high impact and high intensity, and involves a lot of jumping where your muscles exert maximum force in short intervals – great for power and agility, and can be a quick and fun way to burn fat given its higher calorie output.

In order to track your progress, keep yourself accountable. Regularly weigh yourself or take measurements, and keep a food and training diary to understand how training and nutrition protocols affect you on a weekly basis.

 

Source: 4 ways to increase fat loss

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mobiletrainer3

10 online and app-based training programs

Whether you do best with a real-life trainer to keep you accountable, learn best from demos or written instructions or prioritise tracking tools, here are 10 pocket gyms to suit those who don’t have access to a gym.

1. trainingonline.com

HIT: Devised by a qualified trainer, the customised programs on this free site answer goals such as weight loss, strength conditioning and general fitness. The fitness library contains more than 200 exercises complete with video demonstrations, iPod-ready instructions and printer-friendly versions perfect for lunchtime sessions. The site’s user guide makes it a doddle to use the extensive functions.
MISS: If you tend to be derailed or struggle to stay motivated, consider a real-life trainer as the lack of personal ongoing support puts the onus on users.

COST: Free

2. fitness.com

HIT: More an online toolkit brimming with health and fitness tools than a program per se, fitness.com is ideal for returning exercisers or those who have some experience in training. Built around a thriving community of highly active, supportive users, it has a sorority vibe. You can rest assured you’re not the only one asking the questions you do or struggling with an issue.
MISS: If you need practical advice or lack foundation fitness knowledge, consider a website that offers prescriptive plans.
COST: Free

3. workoutsforyou.com

HIT: With a whopping 5,000 exercises able to be matched to users’ expertise, equipment, interests and goals, workout offers two payment packages with perks such as a personal trainer, ongoing customisation and regularly updated workouts.

MISS: Expensive compared to other featured websites – but still far cheaper than most gyms.
COST: Made Just For You – 4 months/$99; Self-directed – 4 months/$59

4. fitera.com

HIT: The re branded version of Fast Track to Weight Loss is expressly geared to toning and fat loss with a focus on efficiency. Perks include workout videos from fitness experts and live weekly chats with trainers. The personalised fitness plans are flexible, allowing for modifications to suit respective needs. However, it also provides sufficient structure to stop you from wimping out or falling into bad habits. Sign up for one of the regular challenges hosted by the website to keep you inspired and responsible for achieving your targets. And if you need that extra push, FITera also offers a paid coaching program that is virtually unrivalled in the online fitness community. The benefit of a global online community is hard to beat.

MISS: If you are looking for an advanced strength routine for sports/strength training, FITera’s focus on fat loss and toning may prove limiting.
COST: Free or add ACE Coaching and Accountability – 1 month/$97

5. abc-of-fitness.com

HIT: Based on a mission to democratise healthy living, this website seeks to make health and fitness resources ultra-accessible. For newcomers, information on fitness equipment is ideal for setting up a low-key home (or car boot) gym. BYO organisation and discipline. ABC can be a successful motivator.
MISS: The ant-size micro text and confusing navigation. If you need to be told what to do or easily lose motivation, the onus on pro activity and self-motivation might fall flat.
COST: Free

6. gymamerica.com

HIT: Ideal for those looking to strengthen or add muscle, this results-oriented site hangs its hat on detailed weights advice. This ‘just the facts’ approach is ideal if you’re a go-getter who’s always on the move and needs basic information in an easy-to-understand format. There’s also a focus on nutrition here, with a dietary plan designed just for you based on personal stats and a 40,000+ food database to pull from.
MISS: GymAmerica substitutes software for a real trainer and while it’s state-of-the-art, it lacks peripheral attributes such as empathy and genuine encouragement.
COST: $38.97/3 months

7. freetrainers.com

HIT: With the word ‘free’ listed upfront, Free Trainers is proud of its complimentary fitness service that has helped provide plans for nearly two million users. All plans are fully customisable, which means you’re always satisfied, if not a little less motivated at times. The community element is a big reason why fans keep coming back to Free Trainers, with the site format replicating a social media network that allows users to search for fellow members by name and email. The detailed questionnaire on sign-up gauges your current fitness level, preferences and goals, and is even smart enough to incorporate particulars such as injury rehab.

MISS: Naturally the non-existent price tag means a lack of human interaction from a qualified PT; however, website staff and fellow users are happy and available to offer general support if you’re able to wait for a response.
COST: Free

8. dailyburn.com

HIT: DailyBurn’s fitness library offers over 100 workouts with a focus on cardio, health and weight training to suit multiple goals. These workouts are each state-of-the-art and ideal for someone who needs to constantly change it up to avoid losing interest. While taking into account your ideal body type, time for exercise and skill level, the website targets programs that suit you. There’s also a great range of tracking tools for keeping up with your progress, plus an incredible food database of over 67,000 items. And if you don’t like it, there are no problems thanks to the free 30-day trial!
MISS: On the surface there’s very little info about what the site offers, which doesn’t do its features justice. The free trial allows you to see this in action, however, with a generous 30 days for you to get a true sense of what’s on offer.
COST: $32.50/3 months

9. itrain.com

HIT: A website purely dedicated to MP3-matched workouts to take to work or on vay-cay, it comprises exercises sorted by interests and goals, so one day you can focus on weight loss and dance and the next, flexibility. If your ideal workout involves hitting the park with your headphones and hill sprinting like nobody’s watching, you’ll enjoy this.

MISS: If you frequently purchase one-off downloads, it can get pricey. Consider a yearly subscription with unlimited downloads.
COST: Average $10 per download, or 1 year/$119.88 unlimited downloads

10. changingshape.com

HIT: With 24-hour personalised support from your own trained PT based on a bespoke plan, this platform lets you substitute other exercises to progress your training and avert plateaus. The emphasis is on sustainable long-term results. There’s a foolproof nutrition plan with customised shopping list, meal plan, swap suggestions and even a guide to healthy fast food options. You can also have your plan tailored to food allergies. A bank of calculators and thriving community make this a great all-rounder.

MISS: Direct debiter beware: you will be billed even if you don’t use the site, yet some people will use the potential money pit as motivation. Testimonials vouch for the sites’ appeal.
COST: 12 weeks/$29.95 or 12 months/$59.95

In need of some inspiration? Check out some of our favourite Instagrams to follow now.

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10 online and app-based training programs

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Image meaghan-terzis-main.jpg

Butt sculpting and core strengthening workout

Why the bosu ball? “By adding an unstable surface, a BOSU ball increases activation of the rectus abdominus and facilitates extra activity per exercise than a stable surface would,” says Meaghan.

 

1. Sit-up

3 sets / 12-15 reps

1. Begin by lying on the Bosu ball with your hips just off the edge of the ball. Place your hands behind your head to gently support your neck.

meaghan-terzis-situp-1.jpg

 

2. Exhale and curl your upper body over the Bosu ball. Hold for a brief second at the top before slowly returning to the starting position.

meaghan-terzis-situp-2.jpg

Words/workout: Meaghan Terzis
Photography: James Patrick 

Click Here!

 

Source –

Butt sculpting and core strengthening workout

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Image teresacore_main.jpg

Medicine ball workout

Complete this routine as a timed circuit or do five rounds (20 reps each exercise).

The gist:

A medicine ball is a weighted ball roughly about 35 centimetres in diameter, and comes in a variety of weights from one kg to 11 kg. They are inexpensive, and available in hard plastic, dense rubber or synthetic leather material.

Medicine balls add a twist to your current workout to keep it challenging enough to elicit progress. This workout is designed to improve your overall athletic performance, firm up your core, and increase your muscular power and stamina. Use of the medicine ball will also help improve your coordination, balance and flexibility.

The kit:

You will need a timer and a medicine ball for this full-body workout. Refer to the workout chart. This four-week circuit-style workout will keep you on your toes, and your heart rate going!

The list: 

The workout comprises six exercises that target all areas of the body. Start with the first exercise, complete as many reps as you can within the recommended amount of work time (see chart), rest for the recommended amount, then continue on to the next exercise. Repeat until all of the exercises are done. As the week’s progress, the circuit gets more challenging. Record your results so you can properly keep track of your progress.

For Weeks 1–2:

Once all of the exercises in the circuit are complete, rest 90 seconds, and repeat the entire circuit two more times.

For Week 3: 

Once all of the exercises in the circuit are complete, rest 60 seconds, and repeat the entire circuit two more times. 

For Week 4: 

Once all of the exercises in the circuit are complete, rest 60 seconds, and repeat the entire circuit three more times. 

Tip: For beginners, use a lighter weight medicine ball. For an extra challenge and to increase your power, use a heavier ball.

teresaworkout.jpg

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Medicine ball workout

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Most of us will have a goal to work towards on our journey to becoming fitter and healthier – we wouldn’t be motivated without it! But while these may vary from weight loss to building strength, there’s no denying that a flat stomach remains the stamp of what many consider a ‘fit’ bod. If it’s not a rigorous bout of abs-focused classes that we put our bodies through, it’s the yo-yo dieting in a bid to banish the bloat as fast as humanly possible. 

Core blimey! The ultimate Lower Ab Workout

Click Here!

Most of us will have a goal to work towards on our journey to becoming fitter and healthier – we wouldn’t be motivated without it! But while these may vary from weight loss to building strength, there’s no denying that a flat stomach remains the stamp of what many consider a ‘fit’ bod. If it’s not a rigorous bout of abs-focused classes that we put our bodies through, it’s the yo-yo dieting in a bid to banish the bloat as fast as humanly possible.

View original post here:

Core blimey! The ultimate Lower Ab Workout

Posted in Exercises, Weight lossComments (0)

<div id="DPG" webReader="131.413503972"><div class="side-bar" webReader="-16.5656565657"><div class="c9"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/al-kavadlo-vital-stats.jpg"/></div><h3 class="article-title c10">Vital Stats</h3><a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/AlKavadlo/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Bodyspace"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/bodyspace-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c11"/></a><a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/AlKavadlocom-Were-working-out/205151489148" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Facebook"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/facebook-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c12"/></a><a href="https://twitter.com/AlKavadlo" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="Twitter"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/twitter-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c12"/></a><a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/alkavadlo" rel="nofollow" target="_blank" title="YouTube"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2013/youtube-social-icon.png" width="20" height="20" border="0" class="c12"/></a><p><strong>Name:</strong> Al Kavadlo, CSCS<br /><strong>Occupation:</strong> Trainer, author, instructor<br /><strong>Website:</strong> <a href="http://www.alkavadlo.com" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">www.alkavadlo.com</a></p></div><p>Over the last few months I've been getting more emails than ever, but often the same questions keep coming up. And for every person who writes to me, there are probably 20 more thinking the same thing but just not bothering to type out a message.</p><p>That's a big part of why I love to publicly answer questions I get from my readers! In this edition of Ask Al, I discuss everything from how to get better at pull-ups, to how to use speed to your advantage, to why I'm such a big sellout.</p><p>Feel free to drop me a line in the comments if you have a question about how to keep growing and progressing in the difficult world of bodyweight training!</p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Zh_xtaQKXNU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p>
<h3 class="article-title">QI've been training pull-ups for almost a year now. When I first started I went from 2 pull-ups to 10 in only a few months. I've been stuck at 12 reps for the last two months. What should I do?</h3>
</p><p>What you're experiencing is common. It's simply a matter of diminishing returns; the better you get at anything, the harder it gets to continue progressing. Be prepared to put in the time and effort if you want to take your pull-ups to the next level. It might feel like you've been at it a while, but in the grand scheme of things a year is not a very long time. Having said that, here are a few methods you can experiment with to hopefully increase your reps:</p><h4>Pull-up supersets</h4><p>Try doing a set of Australian pull-ups immediately after a set of standard pull-ups. Take a long break, then repeat the superset again. It's a great way to keep working your pulling muscles beyond failure once you can no longer perform any more pull-ups. You can do this 3-4 times in a single workout, but make sure you give yourself a few days rest afterward.</p><img src="images/2014/new-ways-to-build-bodyweight-strength-for-years_graphics-1.jpg" width="560" height="296" border="0" class="c13"/><h4>The rest-pause method</h4><p>After a brief warm-up, do as many pull-ups as you can, and then continuing to hang on the bar for a few seconds. After you catch your breath, try to do one more, then one more, and then maybe even one more. You might be surprised at how many extra reps you can squeeze out this way, and you will get an amazing forearm pump from all the extra hanging!</p><h4>Pyramid sets</h4><p>Start with one pull-up, then come off the bar and take a short break. Next, perform two pull-ups, then after another break, do three. Continue this pattern until you reach the point where you can no longer add another rep. Then start working your way back down.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title">QI work a job where I spend several hours a day loading boxes and moving things. I want to start training calisthenics, but I'm worried about overdoing it. What do you recommend?</h3>
</p><p>Well the good news is you've probably built a decent base of strength already just by being active on a regular basis, but it's great that you want to do more. I recommend starting with just one or two days each week of bodyweight work to give your body time to adapt. Try doing your workouts on days where you don't have to work, so your muscles have recovery time. Ideally if you have two consecutive days off, do your workout on the first day and then take a rest day the next day.</p><img src="images/2014/new-ways-to-build-bodyweight-strength-for-years_graphics-2.jpg" width="560" height="339" border="0" class="c14"/><p>Since you'll only be able to train a couple of times per week, full-body workouts are going to be the best way to go. You might eventually build enough strength and stamina that you can add in more days of training and possibly train calisthenics on the same days that you have work, but you will see how that goes as you progress. Be patient, respect your body, and give yourself recovery time when you need it.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title">QI read somewhere that it's best to exercise slowly when practicing calisthenics for strength, but I see most people cranking out their push-ups as fast as possible. Which is the right way?</h3>
</p><p>Though some coaches insist on slow, deliberate reps for strength training, I believe that there's room for variety when it comes to rep tempo. Super-slow training can definitely help build control and stability, especially when you're working through the sticking point on certain difficult exercises, but it's not the only way to approach your training.</p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Owo0vKDTsQs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p>For example, explosive movements like jump squats and clapping push-ups are better for building power. In my opinion, it's good to practice your exercises at different tempos. Once you've honed a move, you should be able to control it and make it graceful at any speed.</p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/BadkW_63ows" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p>
<h3 class="article-title">QI read an article you wrote that basically said training certifications are a bunch of crap. It seems a bit hypocritical to now offer your own cert with the PCC. I mean, really, a certification in bodyweight training?</h3>
</p><p>I'm flattered you've been following me closely enough to have read those earlier writings. You actually remind me a lot of myself—I'm always questioning everything! I bet we have a lot in common. And you're right, there are a lot of crappy PT certs out there. That's part of why I wanted to do the <a href="http://www.dragondoor.com/workshops/pccworkshop/?apid=4e8cb1ea167b0" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Progressive Calisthenics Certification</a>. Though it may seem unnecessary to you, with the current popularity of calisthenics training, the demand for a bodyweight strength certification was undeniable. It was going to happen eventually with or without me, so I figured, who better than me to teach it?</p><p>Mahatma Gandhi said: "Be the change you wish to see in the world." By leading my own certification, I can personally make sure that quality knowledge is bestowed and high standards are upheld. PCC has a physical test to establish a baseline of competency in performing the fundamental exercises, something that is lacking in almost every mainstream fitness certification. It's scary that there are personal trainers out there incapable of doing proper pull-ups or even bodyweight squats, and who got certified simply by memorizing and regurgitating information. That's why a theoretical understanding of exercise will never be enough to pass the PCC!</p><p>I'll still be the first one to tell you, however, that just having a certification—even the PCC—doesn't mean that you are going to be a successful trainer. I can help point people in the right direction, but it's up to each individual to take the journey for themselves. In fitness and in life, we're all personally responsible for our own success or failure.</p><p><a href="http://www.dragondoor.com/b73/?apid=4e8cb1ea167b0" rel="nofollow"><img src="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/images/2014/al-kavadlo-streetching-your-boundaries-book-banner.jpg" width="560" height="144"/></a></p><br /><br class="c15"/><h3 class="article-title">Recommended For You</h3><div class="c18" webReader="6.68632075472"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/stretching-for-strength-a-better-approach-flexibility-training.html"><img src="images/2014/stretching-for-strength-smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c17" webReader="8.91509433962"><h4 class="c16"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/stretching-for-strength-a-better-approach-flexibility-training.html">STRETCHING FOR STRENGTH</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Reports of stretching's demise have been greatly exaggerated. In this excerpt from Al Kavadlo's new book, the bodyweight training chief helps you build an effective, personalized practice!</p></div></div><div class="c18" webReader="4.91048034934"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bodyweight-bust-four-bodyweight-training-myths-debunked.html"><img src="images/2014/4-bodyweight-myths-debunked-smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c17" webReader="6.04366812227"><h4 class="c16"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bodyweight-bust-four-bodyweight-training-myths-debunked.html">BODYWEIGHT BUST! FOUR BODYWEIGHT TRAINING MYTHS DEBUNKED</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Don't believe that high-level calisthenics are only for athletes who look a certain way. Everyone can benefit from the unique challenges that come with bodyweight training!</p></div></div><div class="c18" webReader="5.72282608696"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/push-yourself-one-arm-push-up-and-beyond.html"><img src="images/2013/one-arm-push-yourself-smallbox.jpg" alt="" width="200" height="114"/></a><div class="c17" webReader="7.04347826087"><h4 class="c16"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/push-yourself-one-arm-push-up-and-beyond.html">ONE-ARM PUSH YOURSELF!</a></h4><p style="display: inline;" class="webReader-styled">
Sometimes the toughest strength moves don't involve any iron at all. Heed the call of the one-arm push-up and discover how tough progressive calisthenics can be!</p></div></div></div><div class="padded-content article-content mod-about-the-author" id="article-about-author" webReader="37.5957446809"><h4 class="article-section-header">About The Author</h4><div class="ata-left-column" webReader="6.91304347826"><div class="ata-author-name"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/al-kavadlo.html">Al Kavadlo, CSCS</a></div><div class="author-gradient-button"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/al-kavadlo.html">VIEW AUTHOR PAGE</a></div><p class="ata-author-summary">Al Kavadlo, CSCS is one of the world's leading experts in bodyweight strength training and calisthenics.</p></div><div class="ata-right-column"><div class="ata-author-image-frame"><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/al-kavadlo.html"><img src="images/2013/writer-al-kavadlo-sig-new.jpg" alt=""/></a></div><div class="ata-view-all-articles-link"><ul class="bb-chevron-list bold-type"><li><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/al-kavadlo.html#articles" class="bold-type">View All Articles By This Author</a></li>
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New Ways To Build Bodyweight Strength!

Over the last few months I’ve been getting more emails than ever, but often the same questions keep coming up. And for every person who writes to me, there are probably 20 more thinking the same thing but just not bothering to type out a message.

That’s a big part of why I love to publicly answer questions I get from my readers! In this edition of Ask Al, I discuss everything from how to get better at pull-ups, to how to use speed to your advantage, to why I’m such a big sellout.

Feel free to drop me a line in the comments if you have a question about how to keep growing and progressing in the difficult world of bodyweight training!

QI’ve been training pull-ups for almost a year now. When I first started I went from 2 pull-ups to 10 in only a few months. I’ve been stuck at 12 reps for the last two months. What should I do?

What you’re experiencing is common. It’s simply a matter of diminishing returns; the better you get at anything, the harder it gets to continue progressing. Be prepared to put in the time and effort if you want to take your pull-ups to the next level. It might feel like you’ve been at it a while, but in the grand scheme of things a year is not a very long time. Having said that, here are a few methods you can experiment with to hopefully increase your reps:

Pull-up supersets

Try doing a set of Australian pull-ups immediately after a set of standard pull-ups. Take a long break, then repeat the superset again. It’s a great way to keep working your pulling muscles beyond failure once you can no longer perform any more pull-ups. You can do this 3-4 times in a single workout, but make sure you give yourself a few days rest afterward.

The rest-pause method

After a brief warm-up, do as many pull-ups as you can, and then continuing to hang on the bar for a few seconds. After you catch your breath, try to do one more, then one more, and then maybe even one more. You might be surprised at how many extra reps you can squeeze out this way, and you will get an amazing forearm pump from all the extra hanging!

Pyramid sets

Start with one pull-up, then come off the bar and take a short break. Next, perform two pull-ups, then after another break, do three. Continue this pattern until you reach the point where you can no longer add another rep. Then start working your way back down.

QI work a job where I spend several hours a day loading boxes and moving things. I want to start training calisthenics, but I’m worried about overdoing it. What do you recommend?

Well the good news is you’ve probably built a decent base of strength already just by being active on a regular basis, but it’s great that you want to do more. I recommend starting with just one or two days each week of bodyweight work to give your body time to adapt. Try doing your workouts on days where you don’t have to work, so your muscles have recovery time. Ideally if you have two consecutive days off, do your workout on the first day and then take a rest day the next day.

Since you’ll only be able to train a couple of times per week, full-body workouts are going to be the best way to go. You might eventually build enough strength and stamina that you can add in more days of training and possibly train calisthenics on the same days that you have work, but you will see how that goes as you progress. Be patient, respect your body, and give yourself recovery time when you need it.

QI read somewhere that it’s best to exercise slowly when practicing calisthenics for strength, but I see most people cranking out their push-ups as fast as possible. Which is the right way?

Though some coaches insist on slow, deliberate reps for strength training, I believe that there’s room for variety when it comes to rep tempo. Super-slow training can definitely help build control and stability, especially when you’re working through the sticking point on certain difficult exercises, but it’s not the only way to approach your training.

For example, explosive movements like jump squats and clapping push-ups are better for building power. In my opinion, it’s good to practice your exercises at different tempos. Once you’ve honed a move, you should be able to control it and make it graceful at any speed.

QI read an article you wrote that basically said training certifications are a bunch of crap. It seems a bit hypocritical to now offer your own cert with the PCC. I mean, really, a certification in bodyweight training?

I’m flattered you’ve been following me closely enough to have read those earlier writings. You actually remind me a lot of myself—I’m always questioning everything! I bet we have a lot in common. And you’re right, there are a lot of crappy PT certs out there. That’s part of why I wanted to do the Progressive Calisthenics Certification. Though it may seem unnecessary to you, with the current popularity of calisthenics training, the demand for a bodyweight strength certification was undeniable. It was going to happen eventually with or without me, so I figured, who better than me to teach it?

Mahatma Gandhi said: “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” By leading my own certification, I can personally make sure that quality knowledge is bestowed and high standards are upheld. PCC has a physical test to establish a baseline of competency in performing the fundamental exercises, something that is lacking in almost every mainstream fitness certification. It’s scary that there are personal trainers out there incapable of doing proper pull-ups or even bodyweight squats, and who got certified simply by memorizing and regurgitating information. That’s why a theoretical understanding of exercise will never be enough to pass the PCC!

I’ll still be the first one to tell you, however, that just having a certification—even the PCC—doesn’t mean that you are going to be a successful trainer. I can help point people in the right direction, but it’s up to each individual to take the journey for themselves. In fitness and in life, we’re all personally responsible for our own success or failure.

 

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About The Author

Al Kavadlo, CSCS is one of the world’s leading experts in bodyweight strength training and calisthenics.

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