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The Workout Plan to Lose 15 Pounds

Michael Svoboda/Getty Images Plenty of people are perpetually unhappy with their weight. Even these folks wouldn’t be considered obese, per se, they might just have enough extra pounds to be considered overweight. But we have good news. Whether your spare tire is a result of holiday overeating or some long-term unhealthy habits, you can beat those last 15lbs by following a killer workout plan. We consulted with Andrew Borsellino, C.S.C.S., co-founder of Precision Sports Performance, and Thomas King, C.S.C.S., strength and conditioning coach with JK Conditioning, to build the ultimate workout routine to get you confident and shredded in two months. [RELATED1] “The hardest part always is just getting started,” says Borsellino. “If you lack self-esteem and are wary about walking into a gym or studio, or visiting a nutritionist to get your journey going, an important first step should be trying to find a place where you feel comfortable and a coach or trainer that you connect with.” But if you’ve been fit in the past and know the ropes around the gym and want to go it alone, our simple plan will help you get off on the right foot. “When getting started, make sure you start the right type of program,” says Borsellino. “If you get going on a program that is way too intense right off the bat, it may keep you from continuing and reaching your goals.” Furthermore, if you’re unprepared for a high-intensity workout program, you could potentially be walking the path to injury. At the same time, starting a workout program that’s too easy or not stimulating could just lead to boredom—and boredom makes you more likely to quit. King adds: “In my experience, the easiest way to sneak fat loss work into your routine is through the use of circuits and complexes. Nobody really wants to spend an hour running on a treadmill when you could be doing more engaging exercises like kettlebell swings, thrusters, and squats. I also like to include at least one more traditional strength training day per week. It allows for recovery from the demanding circuits and the lower reps will help preserve muscle tissue during the fat-loss stage.” [RELATED2] Finally, remember that not all workout plans work for everyone. Everybody is different, and different stimuli will lead to different results, but the most important thing to remember is that this is a lifestyle. “Small changes at a time lead to big improvements and lay the foundation for a healthy life,” says Borsellino. The workout The following workout program, which comes courtesy of King, incorporates three workouts per week: two days of circuit training and one day of strength training. Perform these workouts on nonconsecutive days for eight weeks. Before each session, do a light warmup that includes aerobic exercise (like walking on the treadmill for 5-10 minutes) and dynamic mobility work (like banded shoulder dislocations and rotational hip dislocations). Instructions Day 1 circuit: Perform one set of each exercise before resting. After you have completed one full round, rest for two minutes and start again. The goal is to complete five rounds as quickly as possible. For an added challenge, time yourself and see how you progress as you move through the eight-week program. Day 2 strength workout: The strength day will stick to the basic lifts and pair two complementary movements as a superset. Perform exercises in the same superset (marked A and B), then rest 1½-2 minutes. Repeat for the prescribed number of sets. Day 3 circuit: The second circuit incorporates a dumbbell complex. Choose a dumbbell weight you can use for all the exercises, and be sure to do each exercise without putting the dumbbells down. If that’s not difficult enough, after each complex, row 100 meters as quickly as possible. Complete five rounds of this circuit in as little time as possible. Time yourself and see how you progress over the next eight weeks.  [RELATED3] Topics: Fat LossStrength TrainingBurn FatBuild Muscle

Triceps overhead extension with rope

Triceps overhead extension with rope Add the tricep overhead extension to your arm workouts and tone.The Move:Triceps overhead Extension with RopeWhy: Keeping your body in proper standing alignment with core stabilisation and isolation of the overhead tricep extension is an excellent total body exercise with focus on the tricep muscles.How: Attach a rope to a high pulley. After selecting an appropriate weight, grab rope with both hands and face away from the cable. With a slight bend in hips, lean forward slightly and engage core.

10-minute equipment free workout with Tiffiny Hall

Target your arms with this heart-pumping upper body workout by January 2017 cover model Tiffiny Hall.Gear: nadaGo: 20 seconds’ work, 10 seconds’ rest, 4-6 rounds (push yourself!)Words/workout: Tiffiny Hall (pictured)Photography: Future Pictures1. Jab, cross punchesIt’s the ol’ one-two! You can make this one a bit trickier with some hand weights if you’re up for the challenge.

Top fat loss tips

Top fat loss tips From recovery sessions to food intolerances, trainer and IsoWhey sports ambassador Alexa Towersey shares her top five tips for fat loss.1. Complete a lifestyle diaryThis includes what you eat, when you go to bed, how often you go to the bathroom and how much water you drink. This will make you accountable and aware of any bad habits outside of the gym that could be hindering your results.2. Schedule at least two recovery sessions per weekI liken your body to a bank balance. Every training session is a withdrawal; every recovery session is a deposit

Cable One-Arm Triceps Extension

Cable One-Arm Triceps Extension Target and strengthen your arms with the cable one-arm tricep extention.The Move: Cable One-Arm Triceps ExtensionWhy: Isolating the triceps one arm at a time with cable extensions helps concentrate on the triceps muscle and ensures continuous muscle tension throughout entire exercise.How: With your right hand, grab a single handle attached to the high cable pulley. Stand directly in front of weight stack. Now pull the weight down so that your upper arm and elbow are locked into the side of your body.

8 move booty workout

Shape, tighten and lift your butt in just eight moves with this focused resistance workout from fitness model Janine Horsley.Warm-up (not pictured)This dynamic warm-up will prepare your body for key moves. Consider it an investment.2–3 minutes: (20 seconds each)Begin with high knees, running in one place for 20 seconds. Followed with butt kickers, with heels kicking back to touch your butt, for 20 seconds.

Tricep pushdown – rope attachment

Tricep pushdown – rope attachment Target and strengthen your arms with the tricep pushdown.The Move:Triceps Pushdown – Rope AttachmentWhy: This is a strength, cable machine isolation movement for triceps to help target and strengthen.How: Attach rope to a high pulley. Grab with a neutral grip, palms facing one another. Standing up with torso straight and very small inclination forward, bring your arms up to 90 degrees. This is your starting position.Using the tricep, bring the rope down. At the end of the movement the arms are fully extended.Nail it: The upper arms should always remain stationary next to your torso and only your forearms should move

Escalating density training with Alexa Towersey

Escalating density training with Alexa Towersey Take your workouts to the next level with this escalating density style training with celebrity trainer and Women’s Health and Fitness cover model Alexa Towersey.Get involved in the movement and #rawfitspo on Instagram and follow @whandfmag for more.

The kettle bell swing

Not long ago kettlebells were somewhat of an oddity in the gym.

But these days, almost every health club has a set of them – some even run classes focused on them. But, even though they’re now commonplace in gyms, people often get the basic moves very wrong, says Richard.

A favourite move when it comes to the kettlebell is the swing. ‘It forms the base for all your kettlebell training, so before you try different moves, your swing has to be on point,’ says Richard. Honing in on your swing technique could really pay off. ‘If you get it right, you can go heavy and use the swing in your strength workouts to target your hamstrings, glutes and core,’ adds Richard. ‘Or you could reduce the weight, increase the reps and use the swing in your conditioning workouts.’ It’s important to remember that the movement mainly
targets the lower body. ‘You’re not pulling the kettlebell up with your shoulders – instead, you’re creating a force that does the work for you,’ Richard explains.

Classic kettlebell swing

Areas trained: Bottom, hamstrings, core, back

Technique

In a standing position, grip the kettlebell handle in an overhand grip and pull back your shoulder blades. The kettlebell will be just below your waistline.

Put your weight back into your heels and then drop and pivot your hips backwards. Keeping your back flat at all times, move your weight forward, thrusting your hips back into a strong standing position. The speed and power of this movement should bring the kettlebell up to chest height, with your arms stretched out in front of you.

This is where your core kicks in to control the swing back under you, with the kettlebell passing through your legs, before hitting the
next repetition. 

Once you have this mastered, build up your weights. For strength training and to create some lean gains, you can and should go heavy
on sets of swings between 6 to 10 reps. Get confident and then put down that 8kg plastic kettlebell. Get some chalk and swing heavy!

Dead strong

Never tried a deadlift before? You’re missing out. ‘You need to be doing this move,’ says Richard Tidmarsh, lead trainer at London’s Reach Fitness. Here at WF, we’ve long been huge advocates of lifting weights, but it’s nice to see such a huge phenomenon take off thanks to its benefits for strength, fat loss and wellbeing.

But let’s get one thing straight: you can only reap these amazing benefits if you’re doing it properly. ‘Awful form, wasting time on isolate movements and using weights that are too light or too heavy are all common mistakes,’ says Richard.

So let’s take a step back and look at the humble deadlift. ‘It works pretty much every major muscle group in your body hitting your back, glutes, legs and core. So, if you get it right, it’ll improve your posture and strength – and, with time and the right training plan, will be a huge weapon in your armoury to add lean tissue to your body.’

Deadlift

Technique

Set up behind the bar with it touching your shins. Hinge at the hips and knees taking a grip a little wider than shoulder-width apart. With your weight in your heels and spine long and straight, prepare to lift with your chin in a neutral position.

-Now with a deep breath in that you will hold tight during this phase, simultaneously push down through the floor with your heels and drive up with your hips and legs to lift the bar. Maintain a straight spine with your shoulder blades pulled together throughout with your core and back engaged.

-Finish the lift by locking out to full hip extension and standing up straight with the bar tight against you, your back and glutes engaged. You then return the bar in reverse order to the floor, maintaining the positive spine position to execute the lift.

Safety tip

Start with a weight you are comfortable with to get your form perfect. If you have poor spine and hip mobility, you will not be able to get into a good lifting position. So work on these areas of movement before even considering doing this lift.

Meet our expert

Richard Tidmarsh is the owner and lead trainer of Reach Fitness London and trains international athletes such as UFC fighter Jimi Manuwa, as well as celebs such as Jessie Ware and Millie Mackintosh.

Check out Reach at r4reach.com or follow Richard’s Twitter and Instagram for news on his forthcoming training events and seminars.

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