Tag Archive | "australia"

thall1

Win 1 of 100 TIFFXO membership packs for the month of February

To celebrate Tiffiny Hall’s cover, we’re giving you the chance to win 1 of 100 memberships to her workout program, TIFFXO. All you need to do is:

1. Grab your copy of Tiff’s cover mag;

2. Take a selfie with your copy and upload to Instagram + tag #tiffxo #mywhf #rawfitspo;

3. Tell us in 25 words or less why you’re motivated to do TIFFXO this February in your caption.

Get creative and good luck!

 Terms & Conditions for TIFFXO X WH&F Competition 

1. Entry is open to all residents of Australia aged 13 years and over, except employees of the Promoter and their immediate families and agencies associated with this promotion.

2. The promoter shall not be liable for any loss or damage whatsoever that is suffered (including but not limited to indirect or consequential loss) or for any personal injury of suffering or sustained in connection with any of the prizes offered except for any liability which cannot be excluded by law.

3. All entries become the property of the promoter.

4. The Promoter accepts no responsibility for late, lost or misdirected mail or for any prizes damaged in transit.

5. The promoter is Blitz Publications & Multi Media Group Pty Ltd, 1 Miles St, Mulgrave, Victoria 3170.

6. To enter the competition, entrants must:

a. Grab your copy of Tiff’s cover mag;

b. Take a selfie with your copy and upload to Instagram + tag #tiffxo #mywhf #rawfitspo;

c. Tell us in 25 words or less why you’re motivated to do TIFFXO this February in your caption.

6. The competition will be judged by a panel appointed by the Promoters, and will be judged by staff at TIFFXO and Women’s Health and Fitness. The 100 most creative entries will win.

7. The total prize value is $4900.00 with 100 to be won. Each pack is valued at $49.00. Each membership contains:

a. A full month of daily workout videos, meditation;

b. Non-stop support for the month of February.

8. This competition is being advertised by Blitz Publications on its company websites, printed and digital publications as well as on Facebook. You agree and confirm that you absolve Facebook of any responsibility arising out of the competition and acknowledge that you understand that the promotion / competition is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook.

9. Start Date of Competition: Thursday 5 January 2017 

10. End Date of Competition: Sunday 15 January 2017 

11. Winners will be notified on Monday 16 January 2017 

12. Date, time and place drawn: 1 Miles Street, Mulgrave 3170 Monday 16 January 2017 at 12PM AEST.

13. This is a game of skill and chance plays no part in determining the winner.

14. Prizes are non-transferable or exchangeable and cannot be taken as cash.

15. The judges’ decision is final and no correspondences will be entered into.

16. By entering this competition, you consent to Blitz Publications & Multi Media Group Pty Ltd giving your mailing address to product suppliers in the event that you are a winner, for the purpose of delivering your prize. Your address will not be used by Blitz Publications & Multi Media Group Pty Ltd or the supplier for any other purpose.

17. By entering this competition, you also confirm that you have read the Blitz Publications & Multi Media Group Pty Ltd Privacy Policy (http://www.blitzpublications.com.au/privacy-policy) and consent to Blitz Publications & Multi Media Group Pty Ltd giving your mailing address to product suppliers in the event that you are a winner, for the purpose of delivering your prize

18. Should you be selected as a winner of this competition, you acknowledge and agree that no liability attaches to Blitz Publications & Multi Media Group Pty Ltd for any damage to, fault with or issue arising out of the product or prize, either during transit to you, or upon its receipt by you or at any stage thereafter. Blitz Publications & Multimedia Group Pty Ltd will not responsible for this replacement of the product or prize if any issues arise.

19. NSW Permit # LTPM / 16 /01113

This article:

Win 1 of 100 TIFFXO membership packs for the month of February

Posted in Bodybuilding, Nutrition, Weight lossComments Off on Win 1 of 100 TIFFXO membership packs for the month of February

351131c

Health and fitness with Alexa Towersey

Health and fitness with Alexa Towersey We chat to September cover model, Alexa Towersey about all things fitness, health, career and self-love. Check out the exclusive cover story interview below!

ON CAREERI’ve been in the health and fitness industry for over 15 years. I’ve played pretty much every sport known to man including American football, boxing, soccer, skiing and horse-riding. I completed a Bachelor of Science in biology and psychology and went on to do a post-graduate diploma in sports management and kinesiology, and then I interned with an All Blacks-endorsed Pilates studio.

ON EXPERIENCES When I was 27 I moved to Hong Kong, where I was the senior strength and conditioning coach at a mixed martial arts (MMA) gym. I decided to get into half-Ironman events and I took two years to qualify for the world champs.

Original post:

Health and fitness with Alexa Towersey

Posted in Bodybuilding, Health Issues, Nutrition, Weight lossComments Off on Health and fitness with Alexa Towersey

<div id="DPG" webReader="162.790055249"><p>Powerlifting, like baseball and various racing sports, often seems to be more about numbers than people. Competitor X pulled or pushed X pounds at X bodyweight, or totaled X to break the previous record X. Great—but who is this human hoist moving all those pounds?</p><p>Universal Nutrition recently used the 2013 CAPO Powerlifting Nationals in Hobart, Tasmania, as the opportunity to shine a personal light on five of the world's elite strength competitors, in a unique online documentary series titled "The Road to CAPO."</p><p>The athletes run the gamut in size, from 300-pound <a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/kentuckysquat/">Brandon Lilly</a> to Richard Hawthorne at less than half that weight. They come from equally diverse backgrounds and professions. What they all shared was the potential to leave Australia as the strongest pound-for-pound lifter in the world on that day.</p><h3 class="article-title">The Road to Capo, Conclusion<br /><span class="exercise-note">Watch The Video - 24:02</span></h3><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Av3vgpA2zyA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p>Barring such a singular achievement, they all were threats to add a new world record to their resumes, because powerlifting, unlike baseball, is a sport where no stat is sacred. New lifters set incredible new standards of strength on a regular basis, and in Hobart, every member of the team had a benchmark in his sights.</p><p>Got a half-hour? Watch this dramatic video of the meet. If you have a few minutes to spare, watch the short video features on the athletes. Either way, you're likely to end up with a new appreciation for what happens both on the platform and on the road leading to it.</p><h3 class="article-title">Eric Lilliebridge: </h3><p>It would be easy to call Eric Lilliebridge a powerlifting prodigy, but the label doesn't quite do justice to the depth of experience he has accumulated in just 23 years. Eric, his father Ernie, Sr., and his brother Ernie, Jr., all accomplished pro powerlifters and <a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/univ/univ.htm">Animal athletes</a>, constitute three stout branches on what must be the world's strongest family tree.</p><p>Young Eric asked his father to coach him beginning at age 13, and by 18, the baby of the family could deadlift 800 pounds and had systematically climbed to the upper echelon of the sport. His accomplishments have only grown since then. He has set multiple world records including a 903-pound raw squat in a competition last November. On his very next lift, he increased his own record by an additional 22 pounds.</p><img src="images/2014/down-under-the-bar-2.jpg" width="560" height="317"/><p>Eric Lilliebridge is the toast of the 275 weight class at age 23, with multiple squat records already to his name.</p><p>In his chapter of The Road to CAPO, "<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=se7PYe0XPeE" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Bonds that Hold</a>," Eric and his filial training partners open the door into what it's like to lift and train as a family. They also visit the hard Chicago neighborhood where Eric and his brother grew up—and where spotting one another was a question of life and death.</p><h3 class="article-title">Garrett Griffin: </h3><p>Garrett "Gunz" Griffin was strong long before he was a strength competitor. One fateful day, he had casually bench-pressed almost two and a half times his bodyweight in a gym in his hometown in Louisiana, when a bystander mentioned a local bench press contest with a $1,000 prize.</p><p>"I really didn't put too much into it. I just showed up at the competition," Griffin recalls. "There were like 17 powerlifters there with their big gym bags and all their equipment. I just walked in: Me, myself, and nothin'." He left with the money after pressing 440 pounds at a bodyweight of 188 pounds.</p><p>That was in 2010, and in the ensuing years, the powerlifting newcomer has quickly established himself as one of the world's top raw benchers, getting comfortable in the rarified air of 500-pound benches. In "<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L8F4I7dvZIg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Weight of Expecations</a>." Griffin tours the bayou where he and his family have persevered and gotten stronger in the years following Hurricane Katrina.</p><img src="images/2014/down-under-the-bar-3.jpg" width="560" height="360"/><p>5-foot-4 Richard Hawthorne played defensive back in college. "They couldn't see me, but you best believe they felt me," he says of his opponents.</p><h3 class="article-title">Richard Hawthorne: </h3><p>If you've ever seen Richard Hawthorne lift you probably remember it, even if you didn't know his name at the time. It's not often that you see a 5-foot-4, 130-pound man lift nearly five times his bodyweight off of the ground.</p><p>Hawthorne has made enough of a habit of doing this, both in competition and in exhibitions like the Animal Cage at the Arnold Classic, that he has earned the nickname "The Ant." Pound-for-pound, he's as strong as they come, which Hawthorne attributes to his dedication to building three specific types of strength: abdominal strength, strong technique, and mental resolve.</p><p>"Just because you're made a certain way don't mean you have any kind of limits. You can do anything you want. It's a mental thing," Hawthorne says in his feature, "<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2TG79FmMyUE" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">No Limits</a>." "When I lift, people see the intensity. I don't say much, I don't yell, or do all that much, but they can see it."</p><h3 class="article-title">Sam Byrd: </h3><p><a href="http://contest.bodybuilding.com/bio/358252/">Sam Byrd</a> is a classic "powerbuilder," the type who makes unthinkable poundage look puny while maintaining a level of conditioning that could earn him a bodybuilding trophy any day of the week. But the longtime competitor is best known best as one of the all-time greats in the squat. He holds records in both raw and equipped lifting, and admits that CAPO presented a special opportunity to add to his legend. "Of course I have numbers in my head," he says, "but I want to do my speaking on the platform."</p><p>Fortunately, Byrd is more willing in his feature to speak openly about his goals in life, as well as his ambitious and tireless approach to goal-setting. In "<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L8F4I7dvZIg" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Unattainable</a>," he explains how he has progressed from one seemingly unreachable goal to another, and how his role as a world-class powerlifter and ambassador of the sport intersects with life as a practicing attorney.</p><img src="images/2014/down-under-the-bar-1.jpg" width="560" height="373"/><p>Can your attorney squat 900 pounds? Sam Byrd can.</p><h3 class="article-title">Brandon Lilly: </h3><p>"I hated the weight room," <a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/kentuckysquat/">Brandon Lilly</a> admits. And with good reason: His initial experiences in his middle school gym class were utterly humiliating, leaving him flat on his back with his peers watching all around. But he came back, and kept coming back, until he eventually built a kinship with the iron that allowed Lilly to thrive as a powerlifter and strongman. He also helped bring a number of other strong lifters to new competitive heights along with him as the creator of the Cube Method of powerlifting training.</p><p>In "<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qrp4a-LBGdc" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">From Nothing</a>," the burly, bearded Kentucky native gives his frank appraisal of the challenge of finding motivation over a long career, and how he balances thankfulness and intensity in the heat of competition. At CAPO, he would have his best opportunity yet to see how his philosophy prepared him to face global competition.</p><br /><a href="http://www.bodybuilding.com/store/univ/univ.htm"><img src="images/2013/animal-banner.jpg" width="560" height="144"/></a><br class="c11"/></div>

Down Under The Bar: The Road To The CAPO Powerlifting Nationals

Powerlifting, like baseball and various racing sports, often seems to be more about numbers than people. Competitor X pulled or pushed X pounds at X bodyweight, or totaled X to break the previous record X. Great—but who is this human hoist moving all those pounds?

Universal Nutrition recently used the 2013 CAPO Powerlifting Nationals in Hobart, Tasmania, as the opportunity to shine a personal light on five of the world’s elite strength competitors, in a unique online documentary series titled “The Road to CAPO.”

The athletes run the gamut in size, from 300-pound Brandon Lilly to Richard Hawthorne at less than half that weight. They come from equally diverse backgrounds and professions. What they all shared was the potential to leave Australia as the strongest pound-for-pound lifter in the world on that day.

The Road to Capo, Conclusion
Watch The Video – 24:02

Barring such a singular achievement, they all were threats to add a new world record to their resumes, because powerlifting, unlike baseball, is a sport where no stat is sacred. New lifters set incredible new standards of strength on a regular basis, and in Hobart, every member of the team had a benchmark in his sights.

Got a half-hour? Watch this dramatic video of the meet. If you have a few minutes to spare, watch the short video features on the athletes. Either way, you’re likely to end up with a new appreciation for what happens both on the platform and on the road leading to it.

Eric Lilliebridge:

It would be easy to call Eric Lilliebridge a powerlifting prodigy, but the label doesn’t quite do justice to the depth of experience he has accumulated in just 23 years. Eric, his father Ernie, Sr., and his brother Ernie, Jr., all accomplished pro powerlifters and Animal athletes, constitute three stout branches on what must be the world’s strongest family tree.

Young Eric asked his father to coach him beginning at age 13, and by 18, the baby of the family could deadlift 800 pounds and had systematically climbed to the upper echelon of the sport. His accomplishments have only grown since then. He has set multiple world records including a 903-pound raw squat in a competition last November. On his very next lift, he increased his own record by an additional 22 pounds.

Eric Lilliebridge is the toast of the 275 weight class at age 23, with multiple squat records already to his name.

In his chapter of The Road to CAPO, “The Bonds that Hold,” Eric and his filial training partners open the door into what it’s like to lift and train as a family. They also visit the hard Chicago neighborhood where Eric and his brother grew up—and where spotting one another was a question of life and death.

Garrett Griffin:

Garrett “Gunz” Griffin was strong long before he was a strength competitor. One fateful day, he had casually bench-pressed almost two and a half times his bodyweight in a gym in his hometown in Louisiana, when a bystander mentioned a local bench press contest with a $1,000 prize.

“I really didn’t put too much into it. I just showed up at the competition,” Griffin recalls. “There were like 17 powerlifters there with their big gym bags and all their equipment. I just walked in: Me, myself, and nothin’.” He left with the money after pressing 440 pounds at a bodyweight of 188 pounds.

That was in 2010, and in the ensuing years, the powerlifting newcomer has quickly established himself as one of the world’s top raw benchers, getting comfortable in the rarified air of 500-pound benches. In “The Weight of Expecations.” Griffin tours the bayou where he and his family have persevered and gotten stronger in the years following Hurricane Katrina.

5-foot-4 Richard Hawthorne played defensive back in college. “They couldn’t see me, but you best believe they felt me,” he says of his opponents.

Richard Hawthorne:

If you’ve ever seen Richard Hawthorne lift you probably remember it, even if you didn’t know his name at the time. It’s not often that you see a 5-foot-4, 130-pound man lift nearly five times his bodyweight off of the ground.

Hawthorne has made enough of a habit of doing this, both in competition and in exhibitions like the Animal Cage at the Arnold Classic, that he has earned the nickname “The Ant.” Pound-for-pound, he’s as strong as they come, which Hawthorne attributes to his dedication to building three specific types of strength: abdominal strength, strong technique, and mental resolve.

“Just because you’re made a certain way don’t mean you have any kind of limits. You can do anything you want. It’s a mental thing,” Hawthorne says in his feature, “No Limits.” “When I lift, people see the intensity. I don’t say much, I don’t yell, or do all that much, but they can see it.”

Sam Byrd:

Sam Byrd is a classic “powerbuilder,” the type who makes unthinkable poundage look puny while maintaining a level of conditioning that could earn him a bodybuilding trophy any day of the week. But the longtime competitor is best known best as one of the all-time greats in the squat. He holds records in both raw and equipped lifting, and admits that CAPO presented a special opportunity to add to his legend. “Of course I have numbers in my head,” he says, “but I want to do my speaking on the platform.”

Fortunately, Byrd is more willing in his feature to speak openly about his goals in life, as well as his ambitious and tireless approach to goal-setting. In “Unattainable,” he explains how he has progressed from one seemingly unreachable goal to another, and how his role as a world-class powerlifter and ambassador of the sport intersects with life as a practicing attorney.

Can your attorney squat 900 pounds? Sam Byrd can.

Brandon Lilly:

“I hated the weight room,” Brandon Lilly admits. And with good reason: His initial experiences in his middle school gym class were utterly humiliating, leaving him flat on his back with his peers watching all around. But he came back, and kept coming back, until he eventually built a kinship with the iron that allowed Lilly to thrive as a powerlifter and strongman. He also helped bring a number of other strong lifters to new competitive heights along with him as the creator of the Cube Method of powerlifting training.

In “From Nothing,” the burly, bearded Kentucky native gives his frank appraisal of the challenge of finding motivation over a long career, and how he balances thankfulness and intensity in the heat of competition. At CAPO, he would have his best opportunity yet to see how his philosophy prepared him to face global competition.


Originally from:

Down Under The Bar: The Road To The CAPO Powerlifting Nationals

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, UncategorizedComments Off on Down Under The Bar: The Road To The CAPO Powerlifting Nationals

<div id="DPG" webReader="245.212918903"><p>As Officer Daniel Banks tells it, every bar in America is littered with guys who think they're MMA fighters because they watch it on TV while sucking down beers. But the police chief in Tripoli, Iowa, knows all too well that not every adversary is a big-talking wannabe. He takes no one for granted.</p><p>"Many prison inmates weight train two or three times per day, 365 days a year," says Banks. "When they're released back into society, I may encounter them in a criminal situation. So when I go to the gym, I train as though I'm fighting for my life."</p><p>The truth is that public servants like Banks are fighting for our lives, not just their own. They battle criminals, natural disasters, and manmade calamities so that we can sleep at night and work out when we please. They plan for the unplanned and think about the unthinkable. Police officers, SWAT members, federal agents, firefighters, and paramedics are the saviors we need most when we expect it least.</p><p>We've all heard about emergency moms who can lift a ton without training to save their babies. But the public servants who see tragedies frequently can't rely on such once-in-a-lifetime feats of strength. They need fitness that works around any excuse, overcomes any hurdle, and is every bit as strong as it looks.</p><p>Meet six everyday heroes who are up to the dual challenges of destroying workouts and preserving society. Ride along with them, and learn what "functional fitness" is all about.</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">1 Armed for Battle: Officer Daniel Banks</h3>
</p><iframe class="c11" width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/CPZIfnl08_I" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p>A 10-year police veteran, Banks says he'll do whatever it takes to apprehend a suspect. He can back this attitude up with years of hard work pushing heavy iron in the gym. The results he's been able to achieve have been impressive enough that he placed fourth out of 60 competitors at the 2010 "Muscle & Fitness" Model Search, his first and only contest. The 34-year-old, who stands 6-foot-4 and weighs 275 pounds, now <a href="http://www.optimumnutrition.com/team.php?id=88&sort=male" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">represents Optimum Nutrition as a sponsored athlete</a> while continuing to fight the bad guys.</p><img src="images/2014/fitness-911-image-daniel-banks.jpg" width="560" height="399" border="0" class="c12"/><p>
<h3 class="article-title">QWhat's your biggest challenge as a public servant and athlete?</h3>
</p><p>"Finding time to get to the gym, let alone get in a full workout. After a 40-hour workweek, it doesn't matter if you're at your daughter's first birthday party, church, on vacation, in the middle of a workout; you can be called away at a moment's notice, 24-7. Then there are court cases and appearances, interviews that may have to be scheduled around what works for the suspect or victim, community projects, and so on. I find that I'm often the last guy to leave the gym as a result of these demands, but I still love my job and I love working out."</p><p><strong>Workout tip:</strong> "Make the most of the limited time you have by focusing on the quality of each repetition, not just how much weight you can move. In addition, slow down your movements to work on both the concentric and eccentric parts of the repetition."</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">2 Arresting Officer: Detective Sandy Avelar</h3>
</p><p><a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/SandyAvelarPro/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Sandy Avelar</a> has time for everything but excuses. She does great work, looks great doing it, and still makes time to volunteer. She's been doing police work for 15 years, including her current stint as a gang detective and riot squad member in Vancouver, British Columbia. The 5-foot-7, 130-pound stunner is also preparing to make her IFBB Pro Bikini debut at the Desert Muscle Bikini Pro in Mesa, Arizona, February 25. But even with these demands, she still finds time to sit the board of directors of the Boys Club Network for at-risk youth.</p><img src="images/2014/fitness-911-image-sandy-avelar.jpg" width="560" height="386" border="0" class="c12"/><p>
<h3 class="article-title">QHow has being a police officer made you better in the weight room?</h3>
</p><p>"I've been a police officer for many years, so I've learned many lessons. Number one is that quitting is not an option. If I quit on the street, it could mean serious injury or death. I take the same approach in the gym. When I think I have nothing left, I push a little more. Even when it feels like I have nothing left to give, there's always more deep inside me."</p><p><strong>Supplement tip:</strong> "Bring your protein shake to the gym and drink it before you leave. Your workout isn't done until you've had it. And don't be content with choking down a flavor you don't like. My favorite powder is AllMax peanut butter chocolate. It mixes well and isn't gritty."</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">3 The Shredded Paramedic: Tamika Webber</h3>
</p><iframe class="c11" width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/3P2FuKzTYU0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p>You're trapped in your car after an accident, badly injured, hoping someone can save you before your life goes up in flames. You need a strong, capable emergency worker like <a href="http://www.tamikawebber.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Tamika Webber</a>, a paramedic and figure competitor from Melbourne, Australia. Webber teaches advanced life support to fellow paramedics, but is also a tireless competitor who most recently placed second in the tall class at the IFBB Nationals in 2012.</p><img src="images/2014/fitness-911-image-tamika-weber.jpg" width="560" height="337" border="0" class="c13"/><p>
<h3 class="article-title">QWhat has working in emergency services taught you?</h3>
</p><p>"To never take my health for granted. You are never too young or too old to make changes to your health. I learned more from one day on the job as an emergency paramedic than in the seven years I spent at university studying anatomy and physiology. Today, I work with obese patients, cancer patients, partygoers who OD, the elderly, and I take away lessons from all of them. There's nothing like the seeing the effects of illness, much of it avoidable, to increase your own drive and determination in the gym to become fitter. Train hard!"</p><p><strong>Motivation tip:</strong> "I follow the adage that reality is the mirror of your thoughts. The more you put in, the more you get out, and that includes fitness. There's no quick fix or magic potion to achieving your goals overnight. Rather, you must set small achievable goals and stay focused on them."</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">4 Swole Patrol: Joe Palumbo</h3>
</p><p>You're depositing your paycheck at the bank when suddenly you hear shouting and find yourself staring into the business end of a gun. You best hope may be SWAT team members like <a href="http://contest.bodybuilding.com/bio/173/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Joe Palumbo</a>.</p><p>A 24-year police veteran, Palumbo is now a member of a SWAT team in New York. He's also been an IFBB professional bodybuilder since 2001, bringing his 5-foot-7 frame down from 250 pounds off-season to less than 220 for contests. For good measure, he's a certified Navy Seal fitness instructor and the director of physical performance for Infinite Labs.</p><img src="images/2014/fitness-911-image-joe-palumbo.jpg" width="560" height="391" border="0" class="c12"/><p>
<h3 class="article-title">QHow do you balance SWAT obligations with your fitness goals?</h3>
</p><p>"SWAT and fitness are both 24-7 pursuits. We are a group of dedicated, highly trained, highly motivated officers who are on call 24 hours a day, every day of the year. We must be ready and prepared for a call-out on a moment's notice.</p><p>To also be truly dedicated to fitness—and in my case, bodybuilding at a pro level—there is no room for, 'Oh, I'll just skip today.' Because of my tactical training mentality, I always plan ahead and have a backup plan for my training and nutritional needs. All my meals are prepared hours in advance, and I always have enough for a 24 hour-span. Honestly, I wouldn't have it any other way."</p><p><strong>Workout tip:</strong> "When it comes to training, technique and approach are as important as exercise selection. Tearing down your muscles should only take a short time. One of the best ways to rip up your pecs quickly is to work to muscle failure."</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">5 Packing A Punch: Mike Kurzeja</h3>
</p><p><a href="http://bodyspace.bodybuilding.com/mkurzeja/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Mike Kurzeja</a> has an 18-year background in law enforcement and now works as a federal agent for the U.S. government, but his title might as well be "Certified Badass." The 5-10, 168-pounder has been boxing for 25 years. He went undefeated as a super-middleweight, but he has also weighed in as a light-heavy. This father of five boys and Optimum Nutrition-sponsored athlete is undoubtedly one of the toughest customers in the quiet town of Downers Grove, Illinois.</p><img src="images/2014/fitness-911-image-mike-kurzeja.jpg" width="560" height="387" border="0" class="c12"/><p>
<h3 class="article-title">QAgent, father, and fighter—how do you keep it all together?</h3>
</p><p>"I have a schedule that can vary from day work to afternoon work to midnight shift work at a moment's notice. In addition, I sometimes travel, which means I can't always work out at the same place. As a result, I have to be flexible and adapt my workouts to different times and different places. Where there is a will there is a way, though. I don't miss workouts, and worst-case scenario, I can always do a core bodyweight workout in a hotel room or run outside if a gym isn't available."</p><p><strong>Diet tip:</strong> "Keep nutrition simple and systematic. Aim for a macronutrient breakdown of 40 percent high-quality proteins, 40 percent carbohydrates, and 20 percent healthy fats. Supplement your daily caloric intake with protein powder and pre- and post-workout drinks as needed."</p><p>
<h3 class="article-title c10">6 Fight Fire With Fitness: Nadine Young</h3>
</p><p>You wake up at 2 a.m., choking on smoke because the wiring in your home has caught fire. The better conditioned the firefighters coming to your rescue are, the better your odds of survival. And few are better conditioned than <a href="https://www.facebook.com/NadineYoungGunz?fref=ts" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Nadine Young</a>, 33, who has been extinguishing flames for almost 10 years in the Toronto suburb of Clarington, Ontario. The 5-foot-5 Young is a top Canadian figure competitor and fitness model, as well as a personal trainer, nutrition counselor, and the owner of a tiling business.</p><img src="images/2014/sidebar-nadine-young-b.jpg" width="560" height="368" border="0" class="c13"/><p>
<h3 class="article-title">QHow do you juggle your public, private, and professional obligations?</h3>
</p><p>"The never-ending rotating shifts take a physical toll, and the lack of normal schedule often makes it tough to do many of the things that non-shift workers consider to be normal. Much of the social aspect of on-duty crew life revolves around crew meals and, given that my lifestyle demands far different food choices than most people are interested in or prepared to make, I often find myself having to fend for myself during meals. But in the end, when you weigh all the plusses and minuses of working in the fire service, I wouldn't change a thing."</p><p><strong>Workout tip:</strong> "To make the most of the limited time you have, get creative and use movements that really get the job done. I complete my biceps workout with a peaking movement, curling a bar attached to a cable on a preacher bench. The preacher bench forces the rest of my body out of the equation. This is one of my favorites, especially pre-contest."</p><br /><br class="c14"/></div>

Fitness 911: 6 Super-Fit Men And Women Who Serve And Protect

As Officer Daniel Banks tells it, every bar in America is littered with guys who think they’re MMA fighters because they watch it on TV while sucking down beers. But the police chief in Tripoli, Iowa, knows all too well that not every adversary is a big-talking wannabe. He takes no one for granted.

“Many prison inmates weight train two or three times per day, 365 days a year,” says Banks. “When they’re released back into society, I may encounter them in a criminal situation. So when I go to the gym, I train as though I’m fighting for my life.”

The truth is that public servants like Banks are fighting for our lives, not just their own. They battle criminals, natural disasters, and manmade calamities so that we can sleep at night and work out when we please. They plan for the unplanned and think about the unthinkable. Police officers, SWAT members, federal agents, firefighters, and paramedics are the saviors we need most when we expect it least.

We’ve all heard about emergency moms who can lift a ton without training to save their babies. But the public servants who see tragedies frequently can’t rely on such once-in-a-lifetime feats of strength. They need fitness that works around any excuse, overcomes any hurdle, and is every bit as strong as it looks.

Meet six everyday heroes who are up to the dual challenges of destroying workouts and preserving society. Ride along with them, and learn what “functional fitness” is all about.

1 Armed for Battle: Officer Daniel Banks

A 10-year police veteran, Banks says he’ll do whatever it takes to apprehend a suspect. He can back this attitude up with years of hard work pushing heavy iron in the gym. The results he’s been able to achieve have been impressive enough that he placed fourth out of 60 competitors at the 2010 “Muscle & Fitness” Model Search, his first and only contest. The 34-year-old, who stands 6-foot-4 and weighs 275 pounds, now represents Optimum Nutrition as a sponsored athlete while continuing to fight the bad guys.

QWhat’s your biggest challenge as a public servant and athlete?

“Finding time to get to the gym, let alone get in a full workout. After a 40-hour workweek, it doesn’t matter if you’re at your daughter’s first birthday party, church, on vacation, in the middle of a workout; you can be called away at a moment’s notice, 24-7. Then there are court cases and appearances, interviews that may have to be scheduled around what works for the suspect or victim, community projects, and so on. I find that I’m often the last guy to leave the gym as a result of these demands, but I still love my job and I love working out.”

Workout tip: “Make the most of the limited time you have by focusing on the quality of each repetition, not just how much weight you can move. In addition, slow down your movements to work on both the concentric and eccentric parts of the repetition.”

2 Arresting Officer: Detective Sandy Avelar

Sandy Avelar has time for everything but excuses. She does great work, looks great doing it, and still makes time to volunteer. She’s been doing police work for 15 years, including her current stint as a gang detective and riot squad member in Vancouver, British Columbia. The 5-foot-7, 130-pound stunner is also preparing to make her IFBB Pro Bikini debut at the Desert Muscle Bikini Pro in Mesa, Arizona, February 25. But even with these demands, she still finds time to sit the board of directors of the Boys Club Network for at-risk youth.

QHow has being a police officer made you better in the weight room?

“I’ve been a police officer for many years, so I’ve learned many lessons. Number one is that quitting is not an option. If I quit on the street, it could mean serious injury or death. I take the same approach in the gym. When I think I have nothing left, I push a little more. Even when it feels like I have nothing left to give, there’s always more deep inside me.”

Supplement tip: “Bring your protein shake to the gym and drink it before you leave. Your workout isn’t done until you’ve had it. And don’t be content with choking down a flavor you don’t like. My favorite powder is AllMax peanut butter chocolate. It mixes well and isn’t gritty.”

3 The Shredded Paramedic: Tamika Webber

You’re trapped in your car after an accident, badly injured, hoping someone can save you before your life goes up in flames. You need a strong, capable emergency worker like Tamika Webber, a paramedic and figure competitor from Melbourne, Australia. Webber teaches advanced life support to fellow paramedics, but is also a tireless competitor who most recently placed second in the tall class at the IFBB Nationals in 2012.

QWhat has working in emergency services taught you?

“To never take my health for granted. You are never too young or too old to make changes to your health. I learned more from one day on the job as an emergency paramedic than in the seven years I spent at university studying anatomy and physiology. Today, I work with obese patients, cancer patients, partygoers who OD, the elderly, and I take away lessons from all of them. There’s nothing like the seeing the effects of illness, much of it avoidable, to increase your own drive and determination in the gym to become fitter. Train hard!”

Motivation tip: “I follow the adage that reality is the mirror of your thoughts. The more you put in, the more you get out, and that includes fitness. There’s no quick fix or magic potion to achieving your goals overnight. Rather, you must set small achievable goals and stay focused on them.”

4 Swole Patrol: Joe Palumbo

You’re depositing your paycheck at the bank when suddenly you hear shouting and find yourself staring into the business end of a gun. You best hope may be SWAT team members like Joe Palumbo.

A 24-year police veteran, Palumbo is now a member of a SWAT team in New York. He’s also been an IFBB professional bodybuilder since 2001, bringing his 5-foot-7 frame down from 250 pounds off-season to less than 220 for contests. For good measure, he’s a certified Navy Seal fitness instructor and the director of physical performance for Infinite Labs.

QHow do you balance SWAT obligations with your fitness goals?

“SWAT and fitness are both 24-7 pursuits. We are a group of dedicated, highly trained, highly motivated officers who are on call 24 hours a day, every day of the year. We must be ready and prepared for a call-out on a moment’s notice.

To also be truly dedicated to fitness—and in my case, bodybuilding at a pro level—there is no room for, ‘Oh, I’ll just skip today.’ Because of my tactical training mentality, I always plan ahead and have a backup plan for my training and nutritional needs. All my meals are prepared hours in advance, and I always have enough for a 24 hour-span. Honestly, I wouldn’t have it any other way.”

Workout tip: “When it comes to training, technique and approach are as important as exercise selection. Tearing down your muscles should only take a short time. One of the best ways to rip up your pecs quickly is to work to muscle failure.”

5 Packing A Punch: Mike Kurzeja

Mike Kurzeja has an 18-year background in law enforcement and now works as a federal agent for the U.S. government, but his title might as well be “Certified Badass.” The 5-10, 168-pounder has been boxing for 25 years. He went undefeated as a super-middleweight, but he has also weighed in as a light-heavy. This father of five boys and Optimum Nutrition-sponsored athlete is undoubtedly one of the toughest customers in the quiet town of Downers Grove, Illinois.

QAgent, father, and fighter—how do you keep it all together?

“I have a schedule that can vary from day work to afternoon work to midnight shift work at a moment’s notice. In addition, I sometimes travel, which means I can’t always work out at the same place. As a result, I have to be flexible and adapt my workouts to different times and different places. Where there is a will there is a way, though. I don’t miss workouts, and worst-case scenario, I can always do a core bodyweight workout in a hotel room or run outside if a gym isn’t available.”

Diet tip: “Keep nutrition simple and systematic. Aim for a macronutrient breakdown of 40 percent high-quality proteins, 40 percent carbohydrates, and 20 percent healthy fats. Supplement your daily caloric intake with protein powder and pre- and post-workout drinks as needed.”

6 Fight Fire With Fitness: Nadine Young

You wake up at 2 a.m., choking on smoke because the wiring in your home has caught fire. The better conditioned the firefighters coming to your rescue are, the better your odds of survival. And few are better conditioned than Nadine Young, 33, who has been extinguishing flames for almost 10 years in the Toronto suburb of Clarington, Ontario. The 5-foot-5 Young is a top Canadian figure competitor and fitness model, as well as a personal trainer, nutrition counselor, and the owner of a tiling business.

QHow do you juggle your public, private, and professional obligations?

“The never-ending rotating shifts take a physical toll, and the lack of normal schedule often makes it tough to do many of the things that non-shift workers consider to be normal. Much of the social aspect of on-duty crew life revolves around crew meals and, given that my lifestyle demands far different food choices than most people are interested in or prepared to make, I often find myself having to fend for myself during meals. But in the end, when you weigh all the plusses and minuses of working in the fire service, I wouldn’t change a thing.”

Workout tip: “To make the most of the limited time you have, get creative and use movements that really get the job done. I complete my biceps workout with a peaking movement, curling a bar attached to a cable on a preacher bench. The preacher bench forces the rest of my body out of the equation. This is one of my favorites, especially pre-contest.”


Visit site: 

Fitness 911: 6 Super-Fit Men And Women Who Serve And Protect

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Nutrition, UncategorizedComments Off on Fitness 911: 6 Super-Fit Men And Women Who Serve And Protect


Archives

April 2017
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
Content Protected Using Blog Protector By: PcDrome.

Enjoy this blog? Please spread the word :)