Tag Archive | "exercises"

Luisa-Polo.07

Glute Workout: 6 Ways To Build Your Perfect Booty

Pop onto FitBoard or the fitness board on Pinterest and you’ll soon learn that it’s all about the butt! Who doesn’t want a backside that turns heads? You can do cardio until you’re blue in the face, but you won’t build a great bum unless you do some weight training. Not sure which moves or techniques are best for building the perfect booty? We’ve got you covered.

India Paulino, Tabitha Klausen, Amanda Latona, and Sara Solomon: The lovely ladies of BSN want to help you build your best booty!

Here are five of the best glute training techniques and exercises you can do, including a complete workout from IFBB Bikini competitor India Paulino. Incorporate these techniques in your lower-body training regimen and you’ll be blown away by the results. A full set of glutes is in your future!

1 Squat!

“Old-fashioned bodyweight squats that go below parallel are a great way to start your leg workout.”

Of all the bum-friendly exercises to add to your workout routine, the squat should be numero uno. True, it’s the queen exercise of butt-building, but it’s also a great movement for athleticism, flexibility, and can even tax your cardiovascular system.

Tabitha Klausen, an IFBB Bikini competitor and proud owner of a great booty has some tips for squatting. “Old-fashioned bodyweight squats that go below parallel are a great way to start your leg workout,” she says. “They’re the perfect way to make sure you concentrate on using the right muscles throughout the workout.”

Before each leg workout, Tabitha does 4 sets of 25 reps of bodyweight squats. She focuses on squeezing the glute muscles to get them firing and ready for her heavier lifts ahead.

Tabitha recommends concentrating on form rather than weight. “Focus on feeling the form through all of your exercises rather than using the heaviest weight possible,” she says. “It’s important to feel that mind-muscle connection.”

2 Go “Wide And High”

Puzzled about how to grow your glutes without also building massive quads? Amanda Latona delivers the “wide and high” answer. “When doing any glute-focused exercise, like squats, take a wide step forward to take the weight away from your quads. Or, if you’re doing step-ups, add more elevation. Both adjustments will add more focus on the glutes specifically.”

If you’re really looking for a challenge, Amanda also recommends lunging by stepping down from an elevated platform. This increases your range of motion, which will result in greater glute muscle fiber activation and growth.

3 Build a Glute Bridge

One problem Dr. Sara Solomon sees regularly is women who are using a regimen that neglects to correct muscular imbalances. “It’s critical to follow a workout that focuses on correcting your muscle imbalances so you can avoid running into injuries,” she explains. “Most of us spend the majority of our day sitting, which further causes the glute muscles to weaken and makes us rely more heavily on our quads and hamstrings to power through our exercises.”

One of Sara’s favorite exercises to correct this imbalance is the glute bridge. To perform this one, sit on the ground with your upper back against a bench, your knees bent, and your feet flat on the floor in front of you. Squeeze your glutes as you raise your pelvis high enough off the floor to create a straight line between your knees, hips, and shoulders.

“It’s critical to follow a workout that focuses on your muscle imbalances so you can avoid running into injuries.”

Focus on using only your glute muscles to do the work. If you need a bigger challenge, put a weight plate or loaded barbell on your hips for extra resistance.

4 Try Single-Leg Squats

Because this exercise puts your body in an unbalanced position, you’ll have to recruit often-untapped muscle fibers in order to maintain balance. This added challenge will get even the most stubborn glutes to grow.

Single-leg squats are often overlooked, but they’re one of the most challenging and most effective lower-body movements around. Many people won’t be able to do one right off the bat. Hold a weight in front of you for counterbalance, grab a wall for help, or put a thin plate under your heel.

Whatever you do, squat down as low as you can.

5 Do Split Squats

The split squat is an excellent butt-building move. When you do it, think about pushing up from the bent-knee position through the heel instead of through the ball or toes of your foot. By shifting your weight to your heel, your center of balance will instantly move slightly backward and will better activate your glutes.

To make split squats even more difficult and thus put more stress on your booty muscles, put a barbell across your back. A barbell works better than dumbbells because your body position is optimized for glute muscle recruitment.

6 Follow India Paulino’s Glute Workout!

The 2013 Bikini International winner knows exactly what it takes to earn the top spot on stage. For India Paulino, that means working her glutes three times per week! “I was always very skinny,” India says, “so I had to work hard to build my glutes.” India’s glute workouts are fast-paced, intense, and effective!

Here’s an example glute-building session:

Glute Training
Watch The Video – 06:18

Recommended For You

About The Author

I’ve been working in the field of exercise science for the last 8 years. I’ve written a number of online and print articles.

Excerpt from:

Glute Workout: 6 Ways To Build Your Perfect Booty

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kettle-bells

Grind To Grow: Try Your Squats And Presses With Kettlebells!


I’ll never forget the first time I squatted with a pair of 32-kg kettle bells on my chest.

It felt like an elephant was sitting on me. The pressure in my gut was immense, and I could barely breathe. Afterwards, my abs were almost immediately sore. I was shocked, because as a competitive weightlifter I could front squat, butt-to-ankles, more than 400 pounds. But these two 70-pound balls of iron made me feel like I was fighting for my life!

Click Here! For 5 Steps to looking 10 Years younger

I quickly learned that kettlebells are unjustly overlooked as strength equipment; they are often only favored as endurance tools for high-rep ballistic movements like swings and snatches. They’re equally adept and providing muscular overload on slow, heavy lifts like squats and presses.

Why? It’s simple: Your body knows that to get stronger, as well as to continue burning fat, it must adapt. Heavy kettlebells give it a challenge that is uniquely difficult to overcome. Because of their odd shape, kettlebells actually make the body do more work than traditional implements such as barbells and dumbbells. Sub them out even just for a couple of movements you already do, and you may be surprised at the benefits you receive.

The Toughest Squat You’ve Never Done

The reason the double-kettlebell front squat is so much more challenging than its barbell cousin is due to leverage. Consider the rack position: With a barbell, the load rests near the top of the spine, across the collarbone and the front of the deltoids, just below the head. In this arrangement, the barbell becomes virtually one with the lifter, making it easier to move the external resistance. This allows you to move much more weight.

With a kettlebell, it’s almost the opposite. In the rack, the weight rests low, against the outside of the forearms, with the elbows pointed down rather than out. The bells try to pull your body forward and off-balance, which forces your entire midsection to reflexively contract in order to keep you from folding in half.

If you’ve been lifting—or just reading about lifting—for a few years, you’ve probably heard this same argument used as a reason to do barbell front squats rather than barbell back squats. But the truth is that the simple substitution of two kettlebells—or even just one—for a barbell means your midsection will take even more of a beating. And this has benefits beyond building core strength.

To start with, you’ll become a better squatter. Because the spine is protected due to the increased reflexive core activation from the rack, lifters can usually squat deeper with kettlebells than they would with a barbell. The difference here is one you’ll likely feel on your backside for days after the first time you try it, so consider yourself warned.

Kettlebell Exercises
Watch The Video – 0:44

Grind To Grow

The increased stability demands upon your core musculature during the front squat are also present in other slow kettlebell lifts—or “grinds,” as they’re often called. Look at the double kettlebell military press, for example: The increased demands placed upon your core mean your body has to work harder to stabilize your joints so your prime movers—the lats and delts, in the case of the press—can do their work.

The upshot, as with the front squat, is that you’ll need less weight to make all types of muscles work more efficiently—particularly the crucial stabilizer muscles around the shoulder and other joints. Efficiency, in this case, means they’ll do what they’re supposed to when they’re supposed to do it. To pick one painful example for many lifters, a strong rotator cuff stabilizes your shoulder joint so you can safely bench press. A weak or injured one, on the other hand, keeps you from benching heavy, or from doing it at all.

Double Kettlebell Military Press

I’m also of the opinion that one of the causes of what are commonly called workout “plateaus” are actually stabilizer muscles that are weak or don’t work properly. Faced with a heavy load that might damage the joint, your body intuitively protects itself by shutting down the nerve force to the bigger muscles—the prime movers—that traditionally do the work.

You may have heard similar logic used to tell you why you should train with free weights rather than with machines. Yes, it’s true: Core and joint stabilizer activation happen to a certain extent with any training tool, but both are more intense with a kettlebell, due to the increased muscular activation from the offset handle. Consider them the freest of free weights.

You Only Need One

“Resist the urge to let your stronger side set the pace. Train both sides to be relatively even with each other.”

Want to know what’s even tougher than a double-kettlebell grind? The same movement loaded unilaterally. Working one side of your body at a time, as with a single-kettlebell military press, requires your body to make all the muscles on the side opposite of the load—and especially the core musculature—contract to keep you from being pulled over sideways.

Another interesting result from training with a single-kettlebell is that you can even-out strength imbalances from side-to-side. Often, side-to-side imbalances are responsible for holding back your progress on traditional bilateral exercises like the barbell squat, deadlift, and military press. Many people find a single-kettlebell front squat to be much more challenging on the core than a double front squat. The same thing holds true for the military press.

If you find you have a strength imbalance, resist the urge to let your stronger side set the pace. Train both sides to be relatively even with each other, both in the number of reps and the amount of weight you put over your head. You may feel like you’re holding back at first, but don’t be surprised if your big barbell lifts get stronger as a result.

Grind to Burn

Strength is a worthy goal on its own, and it’s more than enough reason to try kettlebell squats and presses. But getting stronger is also essential for burning fat and getting leaner over the long term.

Think of it as a cycle. The increased muscle activation and range of motion you experience from doing deep, difficult squats and overhead presses demand that more muscles work harder than they would otherwise. When you work harder, you burn more calories. And since training the core, especially in an integrated manner while standing, makes the body stronger, you’ll be able to lift heavier and work even harder in the future—which burns even more calories. And so on …

The downside, if there is one, is that kettlebell grinds are known to leave bruises—on your ego. I think you’ll be just as surprised as I was at just how hard they make you work. But stick with them, and you’ll also be surprised by the fruits of your labor: A stronger midsection, a more powerful and defined body, and more strength you can put to good use.

Swing For The Fences: Kettlebell Training – Burn Fat And Build Muscles!

Make the kettlebell swing your 1-stop shop for increased muscle size, definition, fat loss, and the heart of a racehorse!

Kettlebell Explosion: Harness The Power Of The Kettlebell Swing

Don’t try to learn the kettlebell swing by watching it get butchered in your local gym. Use these drills to nail this powerful movement once and for all!

Meet The Squats: 7 Squat Variations You Should Be Doing

In the old days, there were two kinds of squats: ‘good’ and ‘bad.’ Today, you can shop around between multiple versions of the movement. No more excuses. Get off the machines and give the squat a shot!

Contributing Writer

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The 7-minute workout

Sculpt in 7 Minutes!

Your best body in less than 10 minutes, you say? it can be done- Wahoo’s 7 Minute Workout app shows us how.

Whether you’e a full-time mum or busy office worker, we’re pretty sure a short and sweet workout  you can get done in under 10 minutes will sound appealing. Well good news, it can be done. If you’re prepared to go hard and give it your all, it is possible to have an effective workout in 7 minutes, and with Wahoo Fitness’ 7 Minute Workout, which combines aerobic and resistance training to work your heart as well as your mules, you don’t need to leave the house to make it happen. This high-intensity form of training is popular for a reason, but you need to work hard if you want to see results.

Try the workout here to reap serious rewards asap!

 

Perform each move for 30 seconds at a time with a 10 second rest in between each. Try to do as many as possible in 30 seconds. keep going for seven minutes in total.

Kit you’ll need: Chair/step

Squats, Areas trained: Bottom, Quads

Technique

Stand with your feet slightly wider than your hips and your toes pointed slightly out.

Keeping your back straight, bend your knees and bend at the hips to lower until you are parallel with the floor.

Push back up to th orginial standing poisition and repeat.

Step-Ups {onto a chair), Areas trained: Bottom, Legs

Technique

Stand in front of the chair.

Step up onto the chair with one foot, followed by the other.

Pause and then step off with the opposite foot first.

Repeat, changing sdes with each rep.

 

Side Plank, Areas trained: Core, sides

Technique

Form a straight line with your body on its side, resting on one forearm with your feet stacked on top of each other.

Hold for 30 seconds.

 

High knees, Areas trained: Legs, Bottom, Core

Technique

Run on the spot lifting your knees as high as possible.

Swing your arms as if you were running normally.

 

Tricep Dips, Areas trained: Triceps

Technique

Sit on a chair with the heels of your hands on the edge.

Slide your bottom off the seat and support your weight with your hands.

Bend your elbows back and slowly lower your bum toward the floor while keeping your elbows tucked in.

Push back up to the start and repeat,

 

Lunge, Areas trained: Legs, Bottom

Technique

Stand with your shoulder back and relaxed, and your chin up.

Take a large stap forward with one foot.

Bend both knees to about 90-degree angle, with your back knee just about the floor.

Push back up to the starting position, then repeat on the opposite leg, alternating legs with each rep.

 

Jumping Jack, Areas trained: Bottom, Legs, Core

Technique

Start with your feet together and arms at your sides.

Slightly bend your knees and jump up in the air.

As you are jumping kick your legs out and bring your arms up and out to for a ‘star’ shape.

Land softly and repeat exercise.

 

Press-up Rotation, Areas trained: Chest, Triceps, Core, Sides

Technique

Starting in a plank poisition with your hands directly under your shoulders, bend your arms to lower your chest towards the ground.

Push back up to the start.

At the top, rotate your body into side-plank position with one arm on the ground and the other extending towards the celing.

Rotate back to plank position.

Repeat, this time rotating to the opposite side, continue to alternate with each rep.

 

The 7-minute workout

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chest-press-with-resistance-band

Chest press with resistance band

How to

1. Attach the centre of the band to a stationary object and hold one end in each hand

2. Stand with your back to the attachment, elbows bent and shoulders abducted to 90 degrees (upper arm level with shoulder) so that your hands are next to your chest.

3. Push forwards and straighten your arms out in front of you.

4. Slowly return to the starting position.


Why use resistance bands?

They are super affordable and the ideal fitness multi-tasker. Just choose the right band based on your weight – it’s all written on either the packaging, online or ask in store. As you get stronger you’ll need to lower the assistance to account for your new strength.

For example, a robust general tension band combined with a heavy band offers roughly the same amount of resistance as a power band, but the combination gives you three different levels of assistance (one with the heavy band, one with robust, and one with both bands). Colours denote the different band strengths and vary between brands.

 

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Image sliders-opener-1109_0.jpg

The Muscle-Building, Fat-Burning Slider Workout

If you want to look like an elite athlete in time to take your shirt off for summer, then you better start training like one. Don’t know where to start? We recruited Ben Prentiss, a strength coach and owner of Prentiss Hockey Performance in Stamford, CT, who trains NHL All-Stars like Jonathan Quick and Eric Staal, to write this full-body workout that can be done with nothing more than sliders—an excellent tool to challenge your muscular stability, balance, and overall athleticism.

“The workout pairs agonist and antagonist muscles together as supersets,” explains Prentiss. “This allows you to train the full body equally without any overcompensations.”

Another benefit: Performing exercises that incorporate movement on an unstable surface forces your body to work harder to keep you balanced. In turn, you burn more calories and become stronger in positions that are more practical and natural than, say, a biceps curl. To finish, you’ll power through three core-focused exercises to jack up your heart rate and strengthen your abs.

CORE CONCEPTS

A strong core is the centerpiece of top athletes, and though this workout targets your abs plenty already, we consulted Ice Cross Downhill 2016 world champion Cameron Naasz—who glides down a 1,200-meter ice track on skates at 40 mph while battling for space against fellow skaters—for more ways to add core work into your training.

WORK UNILATERALLY

To challenge stability, Naasz suggests performing exercises, like box jumps and squats, with just one leg. “If you really get it down, then you can move into one-footed box jumps with a pistol squat at the top of the box. Then you have to jump down on one leg and do another pistol squat. It’s all about progression,” Naasz explains. “Once you get that down, just keep trying new one-legged challenges to improve your stability.”

USE A BALANCE BOARD

“With skating, you have to have the ability to stay under control while working through transitions, so your core is a major factor,” says Naasz, whose sport challenges his core due to constant shifts in his body mechanics. To replicate this, he performs exercises on an uneven surface. “I’ll do squats on balance boards, and I’ll also jump down from boxes on them, trying to land on one leg.” We suggest starting with the former before moving on to the latter.

JUMP LATERALLY

In Ice Cross Downhill, Naasz has to fight to stay forward and upright while his opponents bump into him and he makes contact with the boards. To train for this, Naasz works lateral hops into his program. “We tie a string to a squat rack or boxes and stand next to it facing forward. Then we hop over it laterally,” says Naasz, who will also have a teammate lightly push him mid-jump to disrupt his balance. “It’s awkward. You have to fight to stop your body from shifting midair.” To start, practice by hopping laterally over a bench or small box two feet at a time, keeping your torso and head facing forward. Being pushed by friends is optional.

PRO TIP

If you don’t want to shell out $15 for sliders, use a pair of (preferably clean) socks on a hardwood floor instead.

THE SLIDER WORKOUTPerform 15 minutes of foam rolling, lateral band walks, and light shoulder exercises. Then do this workout two to three times per week.

EXERCISE 1A

REVERSE LUNGE W/ FORWARD REACHHow to

Reverse Lunge w/ Forward Reach thumbnail
4sets
8-12reps
30 sec.rest

EXERCISE 1B

PUSHUP AND PIKEHow to

Pushup and Pike thumbnail
4sets
8-12reps
60 sec.rest

EXERCISE 2A

HIP THRUST W/ NEGATIVE CURLHow to

Hip Thrust w/ Negative Curl thumbnail
4sets
10-12reps
30 sec.rest

EXERCISE 2B

BUZZ SAW PLANKHow to

Buzz Saw Plank thumbnail
4sets
10-12reps
60 sec.rest

EXERCISE 3

PRONE SNOW ANGELHow to

Prone Snow Angel thumbnail
4sets
15reps
10 sec.rest

FINISHERSDirections: Perform between five and 10 rounds of the following circuit, depending on how you’re feeling. Rest 30 seconds between rounds.

EXERCISE 1

MOUNTAIN CLIMBER ON SLIDERSYou’ll need: Sliding DiscsHow to

Mountain Climber on Sliders thumbnail
1sets
10reps
rest

EXERCISE 2

GROINERHow to

Groiner thumbnail
1sets
10reps
rest

EXERCISE 3

OBLIQUE SLIDEHow to

Oblique Slide thumbnail
1sets
10reps
rest

Read more –

The Muscle-Building, Fat-Burning Slider Workout

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base-body-babes-glutes-main

Why you should train your glutes?

Covet strong glutes? We asked the Base Body Babes to share their advice when it comes to training your glutes.

We love having and creating well balanced, beautifully proportioned and functional bodies. Our programs are specifically designed to ensure the body is structurally balanced and moving correctly, with a focus on posture and creating feminine proportions. Generally speaking, women are lower body dominant (whereas men are upper body dominant), so when we design our programs we place a greater focus on the lower body movements to create or maintain these feminine proportions. In our experience, women love having a shapely booty and toned, lean legs.

As the glutes are the biggest muscle in the body, it’s important to specifically work and build muscle in this area: not only because we like the look of a well developed, perky behind, but because the glutes are important to the overall function of the body.

From a functional strength standpoint, it’s quite common for people to have lazy or underactive glutes. This can lead to lower back pain and injuries, as the glutes are primarily responsible for day-to-day tasks such as bending over and picking things up. If the glutes aren’t strong, more stress is placed on the lower back unnecessarily. In most instances, if someone suffers from lower back pain, strengthening the glutes is a great place to start.

It’s no secret that squats are the first exercise that people turn to when they want to build a booty. Although squats are our favourite movement and our programs are based around them, there is certainly more to booty gains than just the squat rack. Too many times we see women squatting without knowing how to correctly activate their glute muscles; without proper technique and activation, results cannot be achieved.

Getting the most out of your booty

1. Technique is everything. Correct technique is vital to keeping you free from injury, to allow you to lift the correct weight and to ensure you are working the exact muscles that you are targeting. If your body starts to fatigue and your technique breaks down, it’s time to stop the set. Many people like to train until failure and take the body beyond what it is capable of, but this only increases the risk of injury. Always remember: safety first!

2. Progression is key. The body must continuously be challenged in order for it to change and develop; if you keep doing what the body can already do, the body doesn’t need to adapt! Every week, aim to increase the amount of weight you are lifting by about two to four per cent.

Challenge your body for best results!

 

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Image box20jumps.jpg

Time Saver Workout: Mini Spartan Madness

WORKOUT BY: Luis Buron, Spartan SGX Coach

 In this workout we’re simulating a Reebok Spartan Race. The mix of running in place and stepups imitate running and climbing uneven terrain and the moves mimic Spartan Race obstacles (as noted in parentheses). The workout finishes with Spartan signature penalty, burpees, and we go for 2 min. because an unpredictable challenge that you weren’t planning for is what we’re all about.
 1 minute: Run in Place
  • 30 seconds: Dead Hang (Rope Climb)
  • 1 minute: Stepup
  • 30 seconds: Box Jump (Wall Climb)
  • 1 minute: Run in place
  • 30 seconds: High Pushup Hold (Z Wall)
  • 1 minute: Stepup
  • 30 second: Body Row (Inverted Wall)
  • 1 minute: Run in place
  • 30 seconds: Hollow Hold (Slip Wall)
  • 1 minute: Stepup
  • 30 seconds: KB Deadlift (Bucket Carry)
  • 1 minute: Run in place
  • 30 seconds: Jumping Pullup (Hercules Hoist)
  • 1 minute: Stepup
  • 30 seconds: Kettlebell Swing (Atlas Carry)
  • 1 minute: Run in place
  • 30 seconds: Active Hang (Multi Rig)
  • 1 minute: Stepup
  • 30 seconds: Lunge (Sandbag Carry)
  • 1 minute: Run in place
  • 30 seconds: Bear Crawl (Barb Wire Crawl)
  • 1 minute: Stepup
  • 30 seconds: Broad Jump (Fire Jump)
  • 2 minutes: Burpee

Source: Time Saver Workout: Mini Spartan Maddness

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Image fit-bodybuilder-torso.jpg

4 Moves for Ripped Lower Abs

For most guys, starting from the bottom and working upward is a great strategy when training abs, because your lower abstend to be more stubborn than the upper portion in terms of strength and definition. The idea, then, is to develop a routine that works every muscle group in your abs in tandem in order to provide the balance you need.

The collection of movements below accomplishes this quite nicely, starting with two movements that target your lower abs, followed by some oblique work, and a core-stabilization finisher. And since it’s impossible to train one portion of the rectus abdominis—your six-pack muscles—apart from another, your upper abs will get plenty of work, too, in this routine.

 THE LOWER AB WORKOUT

EXERCISEREPS
Hanging Leg Raise12-15
Land Mine10 per side
Weighted Crunch15
Swiss Ball Plank30-sec hold

Hanging leg raise

Initiate each rep slowly to de-emphasize the hip flexors and keep tension on the abs. At the top, crunch your pelvis upward and hold for a second.

Land mine

Place one end of a barbell in a corner, with weight on the other end. Holding the weighted end, wave the barbell from side to side in an inverted U-shape.

Weighted crunch

Lie flat on your back with your knees bent, holding a plate over your face. Bend at the waist and crunch up, hold for a second, then lower your torso until your shoulder blades touch the floor.

Swiss ball plank

Rest your elbows on a Swiss ball and get into plank position. Focus on keeping your entire body in a straight line from head to toe.

4 Moves for Ripped Lower Abs

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cardiohiit

4 HIIT workouts to try now

So you want to be one of those super-fit (and perky) people? Set a goal and time frame and train using these HIIT workouts.

High-intensity interval training (HIIT) involves alternating short periods of intense anaerobic exercise with active recovery sessions. These short, intense workouts burn high levels of calories and improve athletic capacity.

How: Try the following routine over two to four weeks and complete two times per week. Make sure you record whether you reached the program goal or not. 

a.Workout 1: Incline sprints (lvl 35) 
30-second maximal output then drop incline and actively recover for 2 min x 5 sets

b. Workout 2: Incline sprints (lvl 35) 
45-second maximal output then drop incline and actively recover for 2 min x 5 sets

c.Workout 3: incline sprints (lvl 35) 
45-second maximal output, drop incline and actively recover for 1.5 min x 5 sets

d. Workout 4: Incline sprints (lvl 35) 
45-second maximal output, drop the incline and actively recover for 1 min x 5 sets

Insider’s tip: Try this instead of long steady-state cardio sessions and watch your fitness levels soar!

Discover more way to fast-track you fat loss here.

Source:

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comp_diet

The 12-Week Bikini Competition Diet

If you’ve always wanted to hit the stage in a bikini or figure competition, this is your time. Our comprehensive plan includes the Workout Plan, this nutrition plan, and motivational tips to help you get a winning physique in just 12 weeks. Give it a try—even if you’re not ready for the spotlight, you’re guaranteed to get into the very best shape of your life.

THE DIET PLAN

How it works: This nutrition program is designed to help you drop fat without losing muscle. In each phase, you’ll have three daily meals and three snacks. After every four weeks, you’ll reduce the number of calories in your diet, without sacrificing protein. In the week before the show, you’ll vary the amount of carbs, sodium, and fluids to help your muscles get that ultra-cut, superlean look just in time for your moment in the spotlight.

PHASE 1: WEEKS 1-4

Follow the meal plan outlined here, which also includes a Food Swaps guide below. In addition, try to consume at least one gallon (16 cups) of water a day. And a limited amount of sodium helps regulate body fluids, so don’t be afraid to use low-calorie condiments like mustard and hot sauce.

BREAKFAST

  • 4 egg whites
  • ⅓ cup (uncooked) instant oatmeal
  • 10 almonds

Totals: 240 calories, 20g protein, 22g carbs, 8g fat

MID-MORNING SNACK

  • 4 oz skinless, boneless chicken breast
  • 3 oz sweet potato, boiled or baked, without skin
  • ½ oz English walnuts, shelled

Totals: 258 calories, 26g protein, 17g carbs, 11g fat

LUNCH

  • 4 oz skinless, boneless chicken breast
  • ½ cup long-grain brown rice
  • 1 cup chopped broccoli, boiled or steamed

Totals: 263 calories, 29g protein, 34g carbs, 3g fat

MIDDAY SNACK

  • 1 scoop whey protein isolate
  • ½ large (8″) banana
  • 1 tbsp natural peanut butter

Totals: 271 calories, 29g protein, 19g carbs, 9g fat

DINNER

  • 5 oz cod
  • 1 white corn tortilla
  • 1 cup sliced zucchini, boiled

Salad with dinner

  • 2 cups mixed greens
  • 10 almonds, crushed
  • ¼ cup cherry tomatoes, quartered
  • ¼ cup red onion
  • 2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

Totals: 328 calories, 32g protein, 32g carbs, 9g fat

EVENING SMOOTHIE

  • 1½ scoops whey protein isolate

Totals: 158 calories, 38g protein, 0g carbs, 1g fat

Daily Totals: 1,518 calories, 174g protein, 124g carbs, 40g fat

PHASE 2: WEEKS 5-8

In this phase, you’ll trim calories slightly to help drop body fat, although protein intake will stay steady to make sure your metabolism remains high and you’re not losing muscle tissue along with the fat. Feel free to keep referring to the Food Swaps list on page one. And keep up your fluid intake, drinking at least one gallon of water per day.

BREAKFAST

  • 3 egg whites
  • 2 oz 99% fat-free ground turkey breast
  • ⅓ cup (uncooked) instant oatmeal

Totals: 214 calories, 29g protein, 19g carbs, 3g fat

MID-MORNING SNACK

  • 4 oz skinless, boneless chicken breast
  • ⅓ cup long-grain brown rice

Totals: 172 calories, 25g protein, 15g carbs, 2g fat

LUNCH

  • 4 oz skinless, boneless chicken breast
  • 1 cup black-eyed peas, boiled
  • 1 cup chopped broccoli, steamed

Totals: 355 calories, 40g protein, 47g carbs, 3g fat

MIDDAY SNACK

  • 4 oz 99% fat-free ground turkey breast
  • 2 white corn tortillas
  • 1 oz avocado

Totals: 257 calories, 31g protein, 20g carbs, 6g fat

DINNER

  • 4 oz cod
  • 1½ oz avocado

Salad

  • ½ tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • 2 cups mixed greens
  • ¼ cup tomato
  • ¼ cup onion

Totals: 290 calories, 23g protein, 17g carbs, 14g fat

EVENING SMOOTHIE

  • 1 scoop whey protein isolate
  • 1 tbsp organic flaxseeds

Totals: 160 calories, 27g protein, 3g carbs, 5g fat

DAILY TOTALS:

1,448 calories, 175g protein, 121g carbs, 33g fat

Source: The 12-Week Bikini Competition Diet

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