Tag Archive | "exercises"

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Strength building core finisher workout

The core includes all of the abs (deep and superficial) in addition to the muscles of the hips and lower back. These four exercises are designed to target as much of the core as possible. When combined with the flexion, extension and rotation exercises in the DB Complex and HIIT workout, you have a very comprehensive workout plan.

Where possible, think of squeezing the inner thighs together and drawing the pelvic floor in and up (think holding your pee mid-flow) – this is the most surefire way to activate the midline and the ‘lazier’ lower and deep transverse abdominals.

We don’t just want a washboard stomach on the outside, we want a corset on the inside.

You can do the exercises in any order but I like to start with the lower abs (reverse crunches) and finish with a neutral spine (reinforcing correct posture for the day).

Reps: 20 of each

Progression:

Week 1: 1 set | Week 2: 2 sets

Week 3: 3 sets | Week 4: 4 sets

Reverse Crunch x 20

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Lying on your back, lift your legs in the air with your knees slightly bent. Place your hands on the floor beside you. Without momentum, use your lower abs to slowly curl the hips off the floor as if you want to touch your toes to the ceiling. Slowly lower them back to the starting position. This is one rep.

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Sit down on the mat with your knees bent, your hands hugging your knees and lift your feet off the floor. Open your arms, extend your legs as long and as low as possible without arching your back. Lift your torso, bend your knees, and return to the starting position

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Lie on your back and raise your legs 90 degrees. Spread your arms straight out to your sides for support. Rotate your legs to one side, stopping short of touching the floor. Rotate to the other side. Try and reach the top hip on the rotation while keeping the opposite shoulder on the ground to make sure you’re not only working the abs but getting a great stretch through the upper (thoracic spine). As you improve, bring your arms closer in to your body so they offer less stability

Plank-Ups x 12

 

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The goal is to maintain a solid plank position throughout the whole exercise and to not let your hips sway. Start on your elbows and toes. Keep your hips as still as possible, push up with one hand, then the other, until you are propped up in a push-up position. Lower back down to your elbows one arm at a time. Halfway through, change your leading arm so you strengthen the other shoulder as you press up to your hands. Note: hand placement should be where your elbows were – don’t cheat the movement by just trying to straighten your arm.

Models/Trainers: Alexa Towersey (@actionalexa) &
Jenna Douros (@jennalouise_jl)

Photographer: Jason Lee // @jasonminilee

Wearing: Douros – P.E. Nation // Towersey – Heroine Sport
(shoes by Athletic Propulsion Labs) via Stylerunner

 

Strength building core finisher workout

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The Ultimate Upper-body Workout Routine

Each and every one of us steps foot into the gym because we want to improve our physical selves. While we all might have different goals, the same theme exists for all of us…progression. Now, there are a few guys out there that get to lift heavy weights for a living. Perhaps they’ve been lucky enough to gain major sponsorship or have lucrative contracts with a magazine and/or sports supplement manufacturer. These guys “get paid” to workout, so for them the gym is their office.

For most of us, however, we can’t afford to build our lives around the gym, but must fit the gym into our lives. Between work, family, friends, and errands, we’re lucky to find just 3-4 days per week to train for perhaps 60-90 minutes at a time. Thus, it’s important that every moment we spend fighting the resistance of dumbbells, barbells, cables, or machines be used with maximum efficiency. That means choosing the “best bang for your buck exercises” that yield optimal muscle-building results in a minimum amount of time.

Below (the exercises) are the two workouts that will help you craft a strong and sculpted upper body. Perform each one once a week for optimal results.

THE EXERCISES

Bench Press

  • Quick Tip: For maximum stimulation of the chest, position your torso on the bench with a slight arch in the lower back; the ribcage held high; and the shoulders shrugged back and downward.

Incline DB Press

  • Quick Tip: Vary the incline of the bench workout-to-workout or set-to-set from 30° to 45° to 60° to target different motor unit pools.

Wide-Grip Pullup

  • Quick Tip: Vary grip widths and the angle of the torso when pulling to effectively stimulate all areas of the back musculature.

Underhand Grip BB Bent Row

  • Quick Tip: Keep the torso bent at an angle of about 75° and pull the bar into the lower abdomen to best stimulate the belly of the lats.

Seated BB Military Press

  • Quick Tip: Use a bench with back support and keep your torso upright throughout the set (leaning back engages too much upper pecs). Bring the bar just below the chin before driving it back to the top.

Shoulder-Width Grip BB Upright Row

  • Quick Tip: Raise the bar to a level at which the upper arms are parallel to the floor. At the top, the hands should be lower than the elbows to best stimulate the shoulders.

Triceps Dip

  • Quick Tip: To keep chest activation to a minimum and target more triceps activation, make sure your torso remains upright throughout the set. Lower yourself to the point where your upper arms are parallel with the floor.

Partial Rack Deadlift

  • Quick Tip: For complete back development, vary the range-of-motion from just above knee-height to as low as the mid-shins. It is best to stick with one range-of-motion per workout.

One-Arm DB Row

  • Quick Tip: Keep your upper body parallel to the floor throughout the set. As you raise the DB, keep the elbow close to the body and do not allow the elbow to go higher than the height of your torso.

Incline BB Press

  • Quick Tip: Use the same torso position that was mentioned above for the bench press. Lower the bar to the top of the chest, just below the chin.

Chest Dip

  • Quick Tip: Keep your torso leaning forward throughout the set to more strongly engage the pecs. Lower yourself to a point where you can feel a slight stretch in the chest before pushing back to the top. To keep more tension on the pecs, do not lockout.

Seated DB Press

  • Quick Tip: To put the greatest emphasis on the anterior delts, press the DB’s with the palms facing each other. To work the anterior delts but also bring the lateral heads greatly into play, press with the elbows held back in line with the torso and palms facing forward.

Close-Grip BB Upright Row

  • Quick Tip: Take a grip on a BB with your hands spaced about 6″ apart. Raise the bar to about the height of your chin to bring the mid and upper traps into play along with the anterior delts.

Close-Grip Pullup

  • Quick Tip: Take a slightly less than shoulder-width grip on the pullup bar. Lift your body up to a point where you feel your biceps are fully contracted, while focusing on keeping lats activation to a minimum. Lower yourself to a point where there is still a slight bend in the elbows to keep tension on the biceps.

WORKOUT 1

EXERCISE 1

BARBELL BENCH PRESSYou’ll need: Barbell, BenchHow to

Barbell Bench Press thumbnail
4sets
14, 10, 8, 6reps
rest

EXERCISE 2

WARRIOR FIT INCLINE DUMBBELL BENCH PRESSYou’ll need: Bench, DumbbellsHow to

Incline Dumbbell Bench Press thumbnail
3sets
10, 8, 6reps
rest

EXERCISE 3

WIDE-GRIP PULLUPYou’ll need: Pullup BarHow to

Wide-Grip Pullup thumbnail
3sets
Maxreps
rest

EXERCISE 4

UNDERHAND-GRIP BARBELL BENT ROW

exercise image placeholder
3sets
12, 10, 8reps
rest

EXERCISE 5

SEATED BARBELL SHOULDER PRESSYou’ll need: Barbell, BenchHow to

Seated Barbell Shoulder Press thumbnail
3sets
10, 8, 6reps
rest
Perform seated.

EXERCISE 6

BARBELL UPRIGHT ROWYou’ll need: BarbellHow to

Barbell Upright Row thumbnail
2sets
10, 8reps
rest
Shoulder-width grip.

EXERCISE 7

BODYWEIGHT DIPYou’ll need: Dip StationHow to

Bodyweight Dip thumbnail
3sets
Max repsreps
rest

WORKOUT 2

EXERCISE 1

PARTIAL RACK DEADLIFT

exercise image placeholder
4sets
14, 10, 8, 6reps
rest

EXERCISE 2

DUMBBELL BENTOVER ROWYou’ll need: DumbbellsHow to

Dumbbell Bentover Row thumbnail
3sets
10, 8, 6reps
rest

EXERCISE 3

INCLINE BARBELL BENCH PRESSYou’ll need: Barbell, BenchHow to

Incline Barbell Bench Press thumbnail
3sets
10, 8, 6reps
rest

EXERCISE 4

BODYWEIGHT DIPYou’ll need: Dip StationHow to

Bodyweight Dip thumbnail
3sets
Max repsreps
rest
Bodyweight chest dip.

EXERCISE 5

SEATED DUMBBELL OVERHEAD PRESS

Seated Dumbbell Overhead Press thumbnail
3sets
10, 8, 6reps
rest

EXERCISE 6

BARBELL UPRIGHT ROWYou’ll need: BarbellHow to

Barbell Upright Row thumbnail
2sets
12, 10reps
rest
Close grip

EXERCISE 7

GENERAL PULLUPYou’ll need: Pullup BarHow to

Pullup thumbnail
3sets
Max repsreps
rest
Close-grip

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The Ultimate Upper-body Workout Routine

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Jenna Douros’ HIIT workout sampler

Designed to get your heart rate high and burn max calories this HIIT circuit by Jenna Douroswill also help you improve your muscle endurance and cardiovascular fitness.

Kick-sits x 20

 

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Start in a bear position, hands directly under shoulders and elbows/knees hovering approximately an inch off the ground, under hips. Keep both hands planted on the ground while you thread one leg though to the opposite side until your hip taps the ground. Bring your leg back through the same way and repeat on the opposite side.

Plyo Push-tucks x 10

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Start by lying on your belly with your hands flat on the floor, tucked just under your shoulders. From this position you want to push your body up into a raised plank position while simultaneously tucking both knees towards your underarms. Return the same way and repeat for a total of 10 reps.

In and Outs in Squat Position on Toes x 20

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Start in a squat position. Now raise up onto your toes before jumping both feet out wide and back in again. That’s 1 rep.

Wall Walks x 8

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Start by lying on your belly with your feet touching a wall and hands above your head. From this position, reverse/push your body up the wall, walking your hands all the way in so that your chest meets the wall. Return the same way and repeat for a total of 8 reps. You ould regress this exercise to reverse burpees, where you just place your hands on the ground as if for a regular burpee and jump your feet up the wall.

Travelling Mountain Climbers x 10 each direction

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Just like your standard mountain climber; the difference being you will move left for 10 reps and right for 10 reps.

 

Jenna Douros’ HIIT workout sampler

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What it takes to become a professional bodybuilder, according to Steve Kuclo

Do you dream of getting paid to train and pose onstage? If so, you’ll want to heed IFBB pro Steve Kuclo’s advice.

As a kid growing up in St. Clair Shores, MI, Steve Kuclo would flip through the pages of FLEX and Muscle & Fitness magazines looking for workout programs and lifting tips to help him gain strength and size. “I’ve always loved competing, and I played a lot of sports growing up,” says Kuclo, who after two years of studying at the University of Michigan decided to change directions and become a full-time firefighter. About this time Kuclo also developed an itch to get onstage as a bodybuilder. After a few years of competing as an amateur, Kuclo, then 25, turned pro in 2011 at the NPC USAs. But he still had financial responsibilities, which meant he had to continue to juggle being a firefighter with his career as an IFBB pro—until last year.

 Like many top names in the industry, Kuclo uses the name recognition, income from sponsorships (he’s currently sponsored by AllMax Nutrition), and earnings from bodybuilding competitions as a platform to pursue other things. His biggest venture right now is a clothing company, Booty Queen Apparel, which he runs with his wife, IFBB bikini pro Amanda Latona-Kuclo. And being a body- builder, entrepreneur, and a dutiful husband means he “pretty much has three full-time jobs,” he says.

We’ll focus on one—being an IFBB pro bodybuilder. Think you have what it takes?

ON THE JOBThe lifestyle of an IFBB pro is a 24/7 grind—your training, nutrition, and sleep quality all have to be on point. Otherwise, your odds of flexing your way to glory are dismal at best. If you’re up for it, here’s what you can expect, according to Kuclo (Instagram: @stevekuclo).

THE DAILY GRIND“Monday through Friday, Amanda and I wake up early and take care of business for Booty Queen Apparel—answering emails, making sure we’re coming out with new products, and planning out appearances at expos. As for the gym, I’m lucky to have a training partner who is flexible, so I go either in the morning or at night for a couple of hours.”To remain nourished, Kuclo cooks at home and take his meals on the road with him.

BEST PART OF THE JOB“Meeting and greeting fans,” he says. “At the 2017 Mr. O expo, a guy said, ‘I had cancer, and watching your videos helped get me through some dark times.’ Meeting people like that is the most rewarding thing about what I do.”

WORST PART OF THE JOBAlong with the wear and tear of training, doing promotions for Booty Queen, and traveling to competitions, Kuclo says there’s another downside to the job: Your sex drive can plummet close to showtime. “If you put an apple pie and my wife in front of me, naked, two weeks out from a show, I know I’m in shape when I’d rather pick the apple pie…though I still may take my wife.”

Source:

What it Takes to Become a Professional…

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Why you should train your glutes?

Covet strong glutes? We asked the Base Body Babes to share their advice when it comes to training your glutes.

We love having and creating well balanced, beautifully proportioned and functional bodies. Our programs are specifically designed to ensure the body is structurally balanced and moving correctly, with a focus on posture and creating feminine proportions. Generally speaking, women are lower body dominant (whereas men are upper body dominant), so when we design our programs we place a greater focus on the lower body movements to create or maintain these feminine proportions. In our experience, women love having a shapely booty and toned, lean legs.

As the glutes are the biggest muscle in the body, it’s important to specifically work and build muscle in this area: not only because we like the look of a well developed, perky behind, but because the glutes are important to the overall function of the body.

From a functional strength standpoint, it’s quite common for people to have lazy or underactive glutes. This can lead to lower back pain and injuries, as the glutes are primarily responsible for day-to-day tasks such as bending over and picking things up. If the glutes aren’t strong, more stress is placed on the lower back unnecessarily. In most instances, if someone suffers from lower back pain, strengthening the glutes is a great place to start.

It’s no secret that squats are the first exercise that people turn to when they want to build a booty. Although squats are our favourite movement and our programs are based around them, there is certainly more to booty gains than just the squat rack. Too many times we see women squatting without knowing how to correctly activate their glute muscles; without proper technique and activation, results cannot be achieved.

Getting the most out of your booty

1. Technique is everything. Correct technique is vital to keeping you free from injury, to allow you to lift the correct weight and to ensure you are working the exact muscles that you are targeting. If your body starts to fatigue and your technique breaks down, it’s time to stop the set. Many people like to train until failure and take the body beyond what it is capable of, but this only increases the risk of injury. Always remember: safety first!

2. Progression is key. The body must continuously be challenged in order for it to change and develop; if you keep doing what the body can already do, the body doesn’t need to adapt! Every week, aim to increase the amount of weight you are lifting by about two to four per cent. Challenge your body for best results!

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Best exercises for sport and cardio fitness

We take a look at top workouts and exercises for building up your sport and cardio fitness  think group fitness classes, running clubs, obstacle courses, hip-hop dance.

GOOD FOR

While not overly useful to the highly trained individual, low-key, entertainment-based group fitness classes or activities may provide a much needed push for the under-motivated.

“These types of workouts would be great for training for a five to ten kilometer fun run or obstacle course, but if your fitness levels are higher, you might find these exercises to be more of a fun sweat session,” says transformation coach and part-time athlete, Emilie Brabon-Hames.

THE TRIFECTA: BODY COMPOSITION, MUSCLE HYPERTROPHY, FITNESS

Military-style obstacle courses have become popular for improving cardio fitness, burning calories and creating positive functional movement patterns. Courses such as True Grit not only provide a physical challenge, but also test your mental resolve and stamina, ensuring compliance. Beyond the 10 to 12 kilometers of the actual obstacle course, they often require a decent training component in preperation for the event.

“These are a fun, effective and challenging way to get your cardio in. You’re working out in a team environment, creating an encouraging atmosphere for increased motivation. People often push themselves harder in this type of environment than they would at the gym or running on a treadmill,” says nutritionist, trainer and online coach Brooke Turner.

“It’s a full body workout, so while you’re doing cardio you’re also challenging your strength. You might surprise yourself with what you achieve.”

Cardio fitness and increasing your breathing and heart rate have important health benefits, beyond body composition. Plus – we might as well admit it – courses that take you out of your comfort zone make you feel just that little bit bad-ass.

“Heart disease is the biggest cause of death for women in the world, and the first step to prevention is keeping the heart healthy. So sweating and making sure you are out of breath four to five times per week is beneficial not just for healthy heart function, but for endorphins, PMT and self confidence,” says Turner.

“Who doesn’t love knowing they can run ten kilometers or punch their way through a boxing class?”

LIMITATIONS

Progression is obviously difficult without a structured plan and engaging in just one style of training will always allow your body to adapt or plateau. Whether you’re a gym junkie or group fitness fiend, Turner recommends varying your training routine.

TRY

Brabon-Hames agrees that you should mix it up and add some high intensity sessions into your workout routine.

“Short-term, you burn calories from any exercise. But if you really want to keep burning long after you finish that session, make sure it is of a higher-intensity to get that EPOC happening at a higher level and see continuous improvement,” she says.

“A mixture of resistance training, low-intensity steady-state cardio (LISS), cross-training and HIIT is your ultimate weapon to being fit.”

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Top fitness tips for building strong abs

Try: Pre-workout muscle engagement

When you’re pushed for time, you want to get the most bang for your buck. Pre-workout muscle engagement is a technique that aims to engage more muscles throughout your workout, which burns more calories and creates a stable base.

How: Try adding the following core and glute activation exercises into your routine:

a.   Toe Taps – 20 reps
b.    Plank – 1 min
c.    Leg Raises – 10 reps each leg
d.    Clams – 20 reps each leg
e.    Body Rolls – 10 reps

Complete 2 rounds

Why: A strong core will ensure you engage the correct muscles during your training and allow you to build a well-shaped physique.

INSIDER’S TIP: Begin each workout with the routine above and you will be well on your way to a killer core!
Activating these muscles prior to your workout will promote a muscle/ mind connection. This increases muscle fibre activation, improving your lifts and decreasing your risk of injury.

Alternatively, if you are unable to effectively engage your core, try a Pilates class to ensure you have the correct technique to build your base.

Tips by Zana, trainer at Goodlife Health Clubs Prahran.

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Holly Holm Talks Training, Trash Talk, and Keeping Her Cool Ahead of UFC 219

 

UFC 219 is quickly approaching, and the title fight is one you won’t want to miss. Former UFC women’s bantamweight champion Holly Holm, the pro boxer-turned-UFC-fighter who won the bantamweight title from Ronda Rousey with a notorious knockout in 2015, will challenge UFC featherweight champ Cris Cyborg for her title.

But this is no ordinary title fight. If Holm wins the featherweight belt, she’ll become the first female multi-division champ in UFC history.

The lead-up to the fight hasn’t been short on drama or trash talk, which is to be expected ahead of any bout, title defense or otherwise. But Holm isn’t one to play into it. No matter the hype around the fight or what her opponents say, she perpetually seems cool, calm, and collected.

In a one-on-one interview with Muscle & Fitness ahead of UFC 219, Holm reveals her approach to fighting such a formidable opponent, why she plays it cool ahead of big fights, and the opportunity to become a multi-division champ in the UFC.

ON TRAINING

Leading up to a fight, Holm’s training schedule is hectic. She runs five days a week, does mitt work for four or five days a week, and has a class each morning in sparring, wrestling, or grappling. On Saturdays, she knocks out a sprint run for good measure.

On top of training, every fight brings a new wave of media obligations. While it can be tough to stick to her rigorous training schedule amid those responsibilities, Holm says it’s a matter of staying disciplined and looking ahead.

“I go do my workout, do the media, and go right back to my workouts,” Holm told M&F. “It may mean running in the dark with a headlamp on because I didn’t get it done before the sun went down, but I know that the time put in then will pay off later. I’m disciplined to get it done, but there are times when it’s challenging for sure.”

ON THE HIGHS AND LOWS OF HER CAREER

Holm made headlines for taking down Ronda Rousey with a knockout via head kick and punches to become the UFC women’s bantamweight champion back in 2015, but she abruptly hit a slump, losing her next three bouts and shattering her thumb during a bout against Valentina Shevchenko. But even when she’s down, Holm keeps her head up.

“I’ve had highs and lows in my career before, and it’s easy to be happy and confident when you’re on top. But it’s definitely a challenge when you have losses that come your way, and it’s one of those things where you have to dig deep. It’s not up to anybody else…My dad has always told me that you’re in charge of your own happiness. If you’re letting someone else control your happiness, you’re letting them control how you think and how you feel.”

Losses still get her down, of course. Holm is just wired to not stay down.

“I knew that I was able to still move forward and push through,” she says. “It’s my life, and it’s not over after a loss. I know that I’m still capable and I still believe in myself, so I just keep trucking forward.”

And when it came to recovering from her thumb injury, which required surgery, she took the setback in stride with a simple rule of, well, you know. “If it hurt, I’d still work with it, but if I’d damage it [by training], I’d still be careful,” she says.

Despite those setbacks, Holm came back and won her last bout against Bethe Correia at UFC Fight Night 111. Now, she’s ready to give it her all against Cyborg at UFC 219.

ON THE POSSIBILITY OF BECOMING THE FIRST FEMALE UFC TWO-DIVISION CHAMP

During her career as a boxer, Holm held titles in three weight classes, defending her titles 16 times. If she dethrones Cyborg and wins the featherweight championship belt on December 30, she’ll become the first woman to have held titles in two divisions in the UFC.

“Holding a title in two weight classes is something that motivates me. I want to win a fight whether it’s for a belt or not, but there’s that extra motivation to be able to do something that hasn’t been done.” But even if she does win the featherweight title, she doesn’t see herself going for a third weight class.

ON THE REASON SHE’S NOT AFRAID OF CYBORG—OR ANYONE

Cyborg may not be a UFC vet, but she’s been an MMA powerhouse for more than a decade. Plenty would be intimidated by the thought of challenging her for her belt, but not Holm, who says she’s going into it as prepared as she could be.

“She’s dominant and has been doing well for a reason. She’s very good at what she does, but that doesn’t mean she’s unbeatable,” Holm says. “I’m ready to take on this fight, and I fear her, but I’m not afraid of her. I fear her in the way that I fear any of my opponents, because there’s a possibility of losing a fight against anybody. Every fighter presents their own challenges, and there are lots of things to fear in her, but that doesn’t mean that she’s unbeatable.”

ON TRASH TALK

Plenty of UFC fighters are known for their excessive trash talking, which is admittedly a huge part of the hype leading up to big fights. It’s easy enough to bash opponents on social media, but Holm isn’t one to do that. Despite the fact that fans expect trash talk and animosity between fighters, she prefers to let her performance on fight night speak for itself.

“I try to just have my confidence show when I’m fighting,” Holm says. “I want my actions to be what my message is. I don’t really get too much into the trash talk with it, I just want to train hard, and I don’t want to be the fighter who talks a lot of trash and then looks like a fool because it doesn’t go my way. I try to just stay humble and work hard. I know the training and hard work that’s gone into it, and that’s when it pays off. It doesn’t matter what’s been said on social media.”

ON STAYING COOL, CALM, AND COLLECTED

Athletes in every sport have strict, and sometimes downright ridiculous, pre-competition rituals or traditions to get them ready both physically and mentally—but Holm isn’t one of them. Instead, she says good old-fashioned thorough preparation, sans superstition, is her good luck charm.

“I just try to stay healthy, keep my body feeling good, eat foods that make me feel energetic but not overly heavy. I like to be surrounded by my team—they make me feel good and confident, and the energy is good,” she says. “Other than that, I just focus on the fight and I know that all the hard work has been put in.”

Superstitious rituals, she says, won’t make or break that hard work that’s been done. “The hard work and training’s done, and nothing can take away from that, so I try not to get worked up in my head,” she says. “I try to stay level-headed and keep my body feeling good until it’s time to shine”

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The 7-minute workout

Sculpt in 7 Minutes!

Your best body in less than 10 minutes, you say? it can be done- Wahoo’s 7 Minute Workout app shows us how.

Whether you’e a full-time mum or busy office worker, we’re pretty sure a short and sweet workout  you can get done in under 10 minutes will sound appealing. Well good news, it can be done. If you’re prepared to go hard and give it your all, it is possible to have an effective workout in 7 minutes, and with Wahoo Fitness’ 7 Minute Workout, which combines aerobic and resistance training to work your heart as well as your mules, you don’t need to leave the house to make it happen. This high-intensity form of training is popular for a reason, but you need to work hard if you want to see results.

Try the workout here to reap serious rewards asap!

 

Perform each move for 30 seconds at a time with a 10 second rest in between each. Try to do as many as possible in 30 seconds. keep going for seven minutes in total.

Kit you’ll need: Chair/step

Squats, Areas trained: Bottom, Quads

Technique

Stand with your feet slightly wider than your hips and your toes pointed slightly out.

Keeping your back straight, bend your knees and bend at the hips to lower until you are parallel with the floor.

Push back up to th orginial standing poisition and repeat.

Step-Ups {onto a chair), Areas trained: Bottom, Legs

Technique

Stand in front of the chair.

Step up onto the chair with one foot, followed by the other.

Pause and then step off with the opposite foot first.

Repeat, changing sdes with each rep.

 

Side Plank, Areas trained: Core, sides

Technique

Form a straight line with your body on its side, resting on one forearm with your feet stacked on top of each other.

Hold for 30 seconds.

 

High knees, Areas trained: Legs, Bottom, Core

Technique

Run on the spot lifting your knees as high as possible.

Swing your arms as if you were running normally.

 

Tricep Dips, Areas trained: Triceps

Technique

Sit on a chair with the heels of your hands on the edge.

Slide your bottom off the seat and support your weight with your hands.

Bend your elbows back and slowly lower your bum toward the floor while keeping your elbows tucked in.

Push back up to the start and repeat,

 

Lunge, Areas trained: Legs, Bottom

Technique

Stand with your shoulder back and relaxed, and your chin up.

Take a large stap forward with one foot.

Bend both knees to about 90-degree angle, with your back knee just about the floor.

Push back up to the starting position, then repeat on the opposite leg, alternating legs with each rep.

 

Jumping Jack, Areas trained: Bottom, Legs, Core

Technique

Start with your feet together and arms at your sides.

Slightly bend your knees and jump up in the air.

As you are jumping kick your legs out and bring your arms up and out to for a ‘star’ shape.

Land softly and repeat exercise.

 

Press-up Rotation, Areas trained: Chest, Triceps, Core, Sides

Technique

Starting in a plank poisition with your hands directly under your shoulders, bend your arms to lower your chest towards the ground.

Push back up to the start.

At the top, rotate your body into side-plank position with one arm on the ground and the other extending towards the celing.

Rotate back to plank position.

Repeat, this time rotating to the opposite side, continue to alternate with each rep.

Continued here:

The 7-minute workout

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muscle-gain-training

How to increase muscle gain

To increase lean muscle mass, progressive overload is essential – here’s how to build up your gains. Angelique Tagaroulias writes.

Progressive overload not only does it stimulate muscle hypertrophy by forcing the muscle to adapt to increased loads, it also aids in the development of stronger and denser bones, ligaments, tendons and cartilage.

“Progression is forcing a muscle to adapt to a tension that is more than it has experienced before. When a muscle is stressed, there’s an increase in blood flow to the region being exercised, stimulating more responsive nerve connections between the brain and muscle,” says personal trainer and owner of Fully Loaded Fitness, Ethan Hyde.
Hyde.

“I’m a firm believer in keeping things interesting. Your body gets used to what you do, as does your mind. Changing things frequently allows your body to work harder and not get used to it, and also allows your mind to stay entertained and not get complacent.”

Hyde says adding lean muscle mass requires increasing volume, frequency and resistance, and decreasing rest periods:

» Volume: increase the number of sets/reps per workout or over the course of a week.

» Frequency: train a body part more often.

» Resistance: increase weight on a weekly basis or as often as you can while keeping good form.

» Rest periods: you might be resting for 60 seconds but if you drop that to 30 seconds, this requires your body to become more metabolically efficient with anaerobic exercise.

Note: if you’re starting out, try manipulating just one of the variables at a time; if you’re more advanced, you can try more than one.

“Save a couple for when adaptation occurs. You can then bring out shorter rest periods or increase the volume to get the body growing again,” explains Hyde.

Frequency and rest periods are good variables to start with. “By increasing frequency, you increase your total volume across the week. This will focus on the major (weekly) goal, while manipulating rest periods will focus on the minor (daily) goal. Keep rest periods on larger lifts the same but shorten rest periods on isolation work – large compound movements require more energy thus demand more rest.”

As a general rule, more reps equals less rest and less reps equals longer rest.

While some trainers advise to alter programming every four weeks to allow your body to adapt, others will recommend changing it every week – or at least aiming for a slight strength progression on a weekly basis. Hyde believes one to two weeks is best depending on the program: it keeps your muscles guessing and your mind stimulated, while still allowing time for muscles to adapt.

“Everyone should be using a periodised program that allows constant change. And following a prescribed program forces you to change when you’re meant to – not just when you’re bored or feel like it,” says Hyde.

“I like to change my program often to avoid plateauing. If you plateau for two weeks then change it for another month and plateau again, you end up spending a lot of time not growing muscle.”

Source

Posted in Bodybuilding, Exercises, Personal Fitness Training, Training Methods, Weight TrainingComments (0)


Paige Hathaway

Paige Hathaway

1 hour 49 minutes ago

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(desire, faith, a plan, daily action, commitment, determination, learning from failure, persistence)

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Lack of time your excuse?? Then you have the inability to prioritize and make time for your goals/dreams (You make time for whats important) These are all examples to show you that the only limitations in life are the ones we create, believe, and oppose upon ourselves. Don’t let the only thing stopping you from achieving your goals be you. Dream BIG, set goals and take action.

Paige Hathaway

2 days 9 minutes ago

California L I V I N 🌴✨
- I wanna know, Where are you guys located?!

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