Featured Stories
A moment on the piste Running tips Take part in a triathlon How to get rid of back fat What The 10 exercise commandments Bikram yoga Running tips Take part in a triathlon How to get rid of back fat
 
A moment on the piste

A moment on the piste

Improver skier, H&F’s Fitness Editor, Sarah Ivory, headed to the French Alps for a taste of the actionI can sum up my skiing experience in two memories – one, being nicknamed ‘backward stacker’ as I plummeted down the mountain headfirst for the umpteenth time on a school ski trip and, two, shuffling down an icy slope on my backside, my boyfriend shouting words of encouragement in the distance. Even as I write this post, I’m ashamed to admit these things actually happened – they’re not my finest moments. But here’s the thing – I’m not a super-confident skier or a great lover of heights. Skiing is one of the activities that I’ve yet to crack, and that frustrates me. But I am determined to get better at it, mainly because there’s something about a winter break that really appeals – watching the sun rise over the mountains, hot chocolate on the slopes, the feeling of being at one with nature and, ahem, super-cool ski clothes.So, when I was invited to Megève, a popular ski resort in the Mont Blanc region of France, to test drive a new BMW X6 (I know – tough gig, right?), I saw my opportunity to improve. Why? Because Megève is a fairly low resort – the highest skiing is only 2353m – which is perfect for someone who doesn’t have a head for heights. Plus, I’d have just one day of skiing, which presented me with something that I like to call ‘the fear’ (that’s the feeling you get when you leave writing an essay until  deadline day – either suck it up and do it, or fail). And I got to do all of that while travelling around in a swanky off-road vehicle, boasting plenty of room for my ski stuff. Yeah, too right I was on that plane before you could shout ‘snow plough’!THE FITNESS FACTORHere’s the thing I love about skiing – it’s murder on your butt and legs. Staying upright on a pair of skis requires a lot of abdominal and lower body strength. Your chest, shoulder and arm muscles get a bit of a look-in when you use the poles, but this is primarily a sport that’s great for sculpting the lower half. As anyone who has spent a few hours in ski boots will attest, skiing is akin to sitting in the semi-squat position for hours on end – without a break. It is a seriously good strength session. Skiing also requires a high level of agility, balance and coordination, so it’s great for those looking to brush up on their fitness. And these reasons alone make it all the more appealing to me – I love a lower body workout, and my coordination skills leave a little to be desired! So when I arrived at Geneva airport, watching the ‘weekenders’ sail through Baggage Reclaim with their boot bags in hand, I made a pact – I had one day to max-out my leg muscles and I was going to make the most of it. There’d be no time to worry about finding my ‘ski legs’ on this trip.FULL STEAM AHEADAs luck would have it, I arrived in Megève after weeks of regular snow fall. Although it was dark by the time I got to the Hotel Alpaga, where I would be staying for the weekend, I could see droplets of snow hitting the rooftops outside the window. And that filled me with hope of great skiing conditions – something I’d never really experienced before. Blissfully, the hotel was an archetypal chocolate-box, alpine retreat – wood design, mountain views and a hot tub on the terrace– and it made me feel instantly relaxed. I was a world away from my normal pre-ski jitters. The hotel was also only a short drive away from a piste, with slopes accessible by lifts from close to the centre of town.  So the next day, we headed to Megève town centre at 9.30am sharp to pick up our skis and head for the slopes because, when you have just one day of skiing, you join the early crowd.SUCCESS AT LASTIt turns out that Megève is a great place for improver skiers. The chic village is paved with cobble stones and boasts pedestrian-only roads (something that’s surprisingly reassuring when you’re slowly lugging your skis across town). There are over 445km of marked runs and excellent snow cover on the piste, which is largely thanks to the high altitude of the resort. And the powdery white snow is so alluring that I felt obliged to ski on it instantly and without a second’s thought. With just six hours of snow sport to enjoy, I quickly got into the rhythm of skiing again and didn’t feel an inkling of fear once. I swished and swooshed down the slopes; at the back of the group but I was not the worst skier on the piste. In fact, going on a weekend break may have been the best thing that’s happened to my skiing ability. I felt strong and confident, stopping only to enjoy the breath-taking views of the sun creeping through the mountains. Bliss.After a full day of skiing, and a couple of hours spent at La Folie Douce (a cabaret-inspired club on the slopes that really has to be experienced to be believed), I felt successful, stress-free and as if I’d been away for months. So do I feel different after my whirlwind break? I certainly do. Travelling to France for a weekend of skiing is a unique experience, and one that I would thoroughly recommend to any nervous skier. I’m more confident on a pair of skis than I’ve ever been, and I feel thoroughly relaxed thanks to the crisp mountain air. Plus, I have the added bonus of knowing what it’s like to whizz around the mountain roads in a BMW X6. In fact, I feel fully immersed in the winter sport lifestyle. Hooray!  This trip was supported by BMW. For more information about the BMW X6, visit www.bmw.co.uk. To book a room at Hotel Alpaga, visit www.alpaga.com

Running tips

Running tips

1 Hurry up and waitTraffic, parking and a trek to the start can all be unpredictable so getto the race location in plenty of time.Feeling rushed will raise your stress levels, meaning you’ll burn through energy that would be better saved for the race. Better to be early, even if it means chilling out in the car for a bit.2 Hydrate thoroughlyFocus on increasing hydration levels in the days before your race and the morning before. But go to the loo and then reduce the amount you drink in the hour (especially the last 30 minutes) before the start. A mid-run loo break is guaranteed to put paid to any PB dreams you may have had.3 Stick to your planRace day isn’t the time to try out any new strategies  Eat the same breakfast, wear the same kit, mutter the same mantras… keep everything familiar, tried and tested. 4 Warm upGenerally speaking, the shorter the race the faster the race, which means placing more emphasis on warming up dynamically. For a marathon, some light jogging and gentle stretching should leave you prepared. You’ll be setting off quicker for a 10K, though,so add in a collection of running drills such as some high knees, some kick-backs and a little bit of skipping. 5 Get in the zoneVisualise how you’re going to look, sound and feel during and after the race. Run through your race plan in your head, from the pace you’ll hit when the gun goes, to the point when you’ll start to kick for the finish. Decide how you will answer the questions your fitness will be asking you. Repeat your mantras and remind yourself why you’re there, running that particular race in the first place. You’re not lining up because it’s easy; you’re there because it’s a real challenge.

Take part in a triathlon

Take part in a triathlon

Whether you've never cycled, ran or swam before, or you're a seasoned pro, up your fitness challenge with this exciting triathlon...Taking place on the 30th & 31st May 2015, The Vitality World Triathlon London is one of the world's leading triathlon events and one of only two legacy events from the 2012 Olympic games still open to public participation. Since its inception in 2009, the event has attracted the world’s best triathletes as part of the ITU World Series as well as thousands of recreational triathletes from every corner of the globe to swim, bike and run on the iconic Hyde Park course in pursuit of personal glory.  This year The Vitality World Triathlon London are pleased to host the first female only waves in the Tri It distance and are offering Health and Fitness readers an exclusive 25% discount on the entry fee. To make the most of this simply click here to book your space.  https://ssl.anmelden24.de/2015/tln/single/promoVWA.php

How to get rid of back fat

How to get rid of back fat

Guilty of neglecting your back muscles? You're not the only one. We often focus mainly on the muscles we see in the mirror - the ones at the front of the body - while the butt takes all the glory from, excuse the pun, behind! Not only will working on your back boost your overall physique, it'll also dramatically improve strength and posture. A clever combination of the right diet plus the back exercises that give you the most bang for your buck will get you on the right path to eliminating bra fat and back pain.Bent-over row-Stand with feet hip-width apart, knees bent and upper body leaning forwards from the hips. Keep a flat back.-Holding a barbell with both hands, arms extended towards the floor, row the barbell up to your waist.-Lower slowly and repeat.Safety tip: keep your shoulders back and try not to hunchEccentric chin-up-Stand underneath a pull-up bar, on a step if necessary.-Jump up to take hold of the pull-up bar with both hands, palms facing you. Your chin should already be at the height of the bar, at the top of the movement.-Lower yourself as slowly as you can, until arms are fully extended.-Release and repeat.Kick refined carbs to the curbIn order to lose fat, you need to ensure that you're adhering to a healthy diet. Make sure that sugar and refined carbohydrates (like pasta and bread) are sparse in your diet as the consumption of high-GI foods like these will encourage your body to store fat. Fill up on fibrous veg and high-protein sources like eggs and chicken, instead.Want more healthy eating and exercise tips? Subscribe to Women's Fitness. We'll give you 3 issues for £1.

What’s your exercise excuse?

What’s your exercise excuse?

We all know that regular exercise is good for us, but actually putting that knowledge into practice isn’t always so easy. While we may take out expensive gym memberships and splash the cash onnew workout gear in a bid to feel healthier and slimmer, sticking to an exercise regime for the long haul is another thing altogether. No matter how serious we are about achieving our goals, or how good our intentions, our get-fit resolutions can often slip off our to-do lists. Need some motivation to recharge your get-up-and-go? Health and wellness coach Joanne Henson dedicates her new book to doing just that. What’s Your Excuse For Not Getting Fit? (£4.99, amazon.co.uk) provides easy to follow advice and smart tips to stick with exercise long enough to see some pretty awesome results. ‘I wrote the book to help people take a fresh look at theirown self-sabotaging behaviours and limiting beliefs, and to motivate them to change their mindsets, and move forward,’ she explains. Here she shares the most common excuses and her simple solutions to stay on track.Excuse 1: I don’t have time to exerciseWorkouts don’t necessarily have to be lengthy or laborious if you’re looking to lose weight or get healthier. A short, sharp sweat sesh will see you bid farewell to hundreds of calories while targeting a whole range of different muscle groups. ‘Three to four times per week is ideal – this still leaves another three to four days a week when you don’t have to exercise. High-intensity interval training sessions could be as short as 10 minutes, and the best way to ensure that it gets done is to prioritise and diarise. And if you think you don’t have time, try keeping a log of how you spend your time and re-evaluate what’s important,’ says Joanne. Excuse 2: I live too far away from the gym Brrrr! When it’s freezing cold and chucking it down outside you’d probably prefer a date with your duvet over dragging yourself all the way to the gym – especially if it involves an epic commute. We get it. Even those of us with the loftiest intentions can falter when inconvenience thwarts our fitness plans. ‘There’s no point in joining a flash new gym if it’s a 15-minute drive away, which you might not fancy after a long day at work. Much better to join the more basic gym at the end of your road. Then you’ve only got to find time for the workout, not the workout and a journey,’ says Joanne. Gym still not near enough? Try out a range of fitness DVDs and apps that fit easily into your lifestyle.Excuse 3:  I’ve lost my fitness mojoHaving a dip in motivation every so often is normal and if that means you miss a few sessions, so be it – but don’t let that derail your efforts to get back on track. ‘If you do skip a few workouts, remember that the longer you leave it the harder it’s going to feel when you go back. And consider how far you’ve already come – do you really want to waste the effort you’ve already put in? Capitalise on the progress you’ve made so far and stick with it,’ advises Joanne. Excuse 4:  I find exercise boringExercise doesn’t have to be difficult and unpleasant. Ease yourself into it and up the ante when you’re ready. ‘Find something you enjoy. This is an obvious one, but so many people treat exercise as a form of punishment, as something to be endured not enjoyed. But there are dozens of different forms of exercise which you might find more fun, from dancing to rock climbing,’ says Joanne. And, if you get bored of your routine, switch things up a notch by trying new classes, working out different body parts and varying the intensity of your workout. Excuse 5: I’m not seeing resultsLet’s be realistic; you won’t see results overnight, but the more dedicated you become, the faster you’ll see improvements in your overall fitness and your figure. ‘Be patient, give it some time, and remember that exercise has long-term, ongoing health benefits beyond body shape,’ says Joanne. Try keeping a workout journal so you can chart your progress, writing down small achievements after every session, whether it’s going for two minutes longer on the treadmill or reaching a press-up PB. 

The 10 exercise commandments

The 10 exercise commandments

1 Don’t lock outKeeping your elbows and knees slightly soft, even during full extension, is in your interest not only in terms of joint health, but also in making your workout more effective. ‘Not locking out when lifting weights will prevent joint deterioration and reduce your chances of joint-related niggles and injuries,’ explains personal trainer Dave Fletcher (theodysseyway.co.uk). Keeping your joints soft also calls for muscle recruitment throughout the entire move, as it doesn’t allow them to catch a break at the top of the motion. More work equals better results, right?2 Eat wiseYou don’t need us to tell you not to eat heavy meals too close to a workout – you’ll soon feel it if you do. The reason you might feel a little worse for wear when taking on a gruelling session after a big eat is because, when you exercise, the blood flow is directed to the muscles that are working. This means there’s limited flow to the digestive system – something’s got to give.3 Give yourself a liftSquats are a big deal now – it’s a fact. While serious lifters have seen the squat as the holy grail of exercise for years, initiatives like the squat challenge have really popularised the move. But a lot of people struggle to perfect the technique and are, as a result, missing out on maximum results. ‘For most people, squatting with your heels raised will dramatically improve your range of motion,’ Dave explains. ‘If you have tight calves, you tend to lean forwards during a squat and unnecessarily load the lower back, so by raising the heels (on a plank or weight discs, for example) you allow a greater activation of the glutes, quads and hamstrings (bottom and thigh muscles), increasing the effectiveness of the move while reducing the risk of strain to the lower back.’4 Practise your turn-outWe’re not talking ballerina-worthy turn-out, but pointing your toes out just slightly while performing resistance exercises gives you an extra bit of stability that could make all the difference. Keeping your toes pointing forwards might seem like the safest option, but, according to Dave, the stance can feel unbalanced and unnatural since the hips tend to rotate outwards a little.5 Have a breakThe jury always seems to be out on rest days, with different people recommending different things. Should you skip the gym if you feel rubbish, or just power through like a trooper? And how many rest days should you have per week? Either way, one thing’s for sure: you do need rest days, especially between strength sessions or sessions that target the same muscles again. You’re seriously compromising your safety by overdoing it. Even if you feel okay, your muscles will still be recovering, and won’t be able to perform to the maximum until they’ve been rebuilt.6 Perfect your postureIt’s not as simple as standing up straight when performing your exercises, although this is pretty important, too. Having good body alignment can boost your progress by helping you perform exercises with better form, so working on your postural alignment outside of the gym is crucial. ‘Make sure you put the time in away from your workouts, too, by stretching, foam rolling and stopping yourself from slouching when you sit down,’ advises Dave.7 Engage your coreThis is probably one of the first rules you learn when you start exercising. Engaging the core almost goes without saying these days, right? But it really is at the centre of everything and ensures your upper and lower body work in synergy, taking the strain away from the lower back and enabling you to lift heavier weights. And you know what that means? Better results.8 Refuel post-workoutEating healthily in general is pretty important, but for those who go hard at it in the gym, you need to pay extra attention to mealtimes, too. You’ve probably seen those hardcore gym-goers glugging their protein shakes before they’ve even left the changing rooms, and here’s why: after a workout, the muscles are primed to absorb protein, so you want to take advantage of this. We’re not saying everyone should be on the shakes, but make sure you go for a protein-heavy meal like chicken or fish after you’ve exercised.9 Prepare and recover properlyLet’s be honest, we can all be a little guilty of skipping warm-ups and cool-downs, even though we know we shouldn’t. And while we know stretching after exercise helps to reduce injury and aches, did you know that warming up efficiently before a workout actually makes the workout easier. How? Stretching dynamically pre-workout, in similar movement patterns to those you’re about to perform, means your muscles will be more elastic and the blood will already be flowing. ‘Stick to dynamic stretches before a workout and static ones after,’ Dave adds.10 Stay hydratedDrinking enough water is important, regardless of how often you exercise – the body is primarily made up of fluid, after all. If you start to feel thirsty at any point, then you’re actually already dehydrated. And, while rehydrating is easy enough, taking preventative measures by ensuring you never reach the point of thirst is even better. Even minor dehydration can affect your endurance and blood flow. The rule? The more you tend to sweat, the more you should drink throughout the day. So keep a bottle of water on you at all times. Bobble bottles (right) are a team WF fave!

Bikram yoga

Bikram yoga

If you like your exercise hot and sweaty, then you'll love Bikram yoga. Not only does this class boast the usual benefits of yoga like improved flexibility and mood, but it's also great for the metabolism and gives you a serious muscular endurance workout. There's got to be a reason why there are so many adoring fans worldwide. If you want to take on the hardcore yoga class, check out our top tips for surviving your first class...What is Bikram yoga?Bikram yoga is 90-minute yoga class developed by Bikram Choudhury. It consists of a series of 26 postures. Easy, right? Not when the room is set to 40.6°C - the standard temperature for which Bikram yoga is practiced. Don't forget a towel!Why would I do this to myself?There are a range of benefits to doing Bikram yoga, from helping with weight loss and boosting metabolism to improving bodily pains and depression. During your session you will be exhausted and constantly wiping away that sweat, but as your session comes to an end, you’ll actually feel better than you did when you walked in. You will have worked your body and pushed yourself to its limits, and as a result you'll feel rejuvenated and restored.Top tipsStay hydrated. This doesn’t mean chugging a litre bottle of water when you’re walking in the studio door. Drink around 2 litres of water throughout the day before your session. And post-Bikram make sure you restore your electrolytes and rehydrate. Don’t eat 2 hours before the class. A full stomach can be very uncomfortable in the heat. You don’t want to be hungry either, so a small snack might be okay, but you just have to experiment and see what level of food intake is right for you. Show some skin. You are going to sweat, just accept it. So you want to wear light breathable clothing. Don’t be afraid to show some skin, yoga is not competitive - it’s about challenging yourself. Let it rain. As you sweat throughout the class, try not to constantly towel yourself off. Sweat is your body’s way of cooling you down, so embrace it. Come back. The first session is particularly hard as your body won't know what to expect. But make sure you come back for your second class - that's when the fun really starts! Be patient and enjoy yourself... and the sweat!

Running tips

Running tips

1 Hurry up and waitTraffic, parking and a trek to the start can all be unpredictable so getto the race location in plenty of time.Feeling rushed will raise your stress levels, meaning you’ll burn through energy that would be better saved for the race. Better to be early, even if it means chilling out in the car for a bit.2 Hydrate thoroughlyFocus on increasing hydration levels in the days before your race and the morning before. But go to the loo and then reduce the amount you drink in the hour (especially the last 30 minutes) before the start. A mid-run loo break is guaranteed to put paid to any PB dreams you may have had.3 Stick to your planRace day isn’t the time to try out any new strategies  Eat the same breakfast, wear the same kit, mutter the same mantras… keep everything familiar, tried and tested. 4 Warm upGenerally speaking, the shorter the race the faster the race, which means placing more emphasis on warming up dynamically. For a marathon, some light jogging and gentle stretching should leave you prepared. You’ll be setting off quicker for a 10K, though,so add in a collection of running drills such as some high knees, some kick-backs and a little bit of skipping. 5 Get in the zoneVisualise how you’re going to look, sound and feel during and after the race. Run through your race plan in your head, from the pace you’ll hit when the gun goes, to the point when you’ll start to kick for the finish. Decide how you will answer the questions your fitness will be asking you. Repeat your mantras and remind yourself why you’re there, running that particular race in the first place. You’re not lining up because it’s easy; you’re there because it’s a real challenge.

Take part in a triathlon

Take part in a triathlon

Whether you've never cycled, ran or swam before, or you're a seasoned pro, up your fitness challenge with this exciting triathlon...Taking place on the 30th & 31st May 2015, The Vitality World Triathlon London is one of the world's leading triathlon events and one of only two legacy events from the 2012 Olympic games still open to public participation. Since its inception in 2009, the event has attracted the world’s best triathletes as part of the ITU World Series as well as thousands of recreational triathletes from every corner of the globe to swim, bike and run on the iconic Hyde Park course in pursuit of personal glory.  This year The Vitality World Triathlon London are pleased to host the first female only waves in the Tri It distance and are offering Health and Fitness readers an exclusive 25% discount on the entry fee. To make the most of this simply click here to book your space.  https://ssl.anmelden24.de/2015/tln/single/promoVWA.php

How to get rid of back fat

How to get rid of back fat

Guilty of neglecting your back muscles? You're not the only one. We often focus mainly on the muscles we see in the mirror - the ones at the front of the body - while the butt takes all the glory from, excuse the pun, behind! Not only will working on your back boost your overall physique, it'll also dramatically improve strength and posture. A clever combination of the right diet plus the back exercises that give you the most bang for your buck will get you on the right path to eliminating bra fat and back pain.Bent-over row-Stand with feet hip-width apart, knees bent and upper body leaning forwards from the hips. Keep a flat back.-Holding a barbell with both hands, arms extended towards the floor, row the barbell up to your waist.-Lower slowly and repeat.Safety tip: keep your shoulders back and try not to hunchEccentric chin-up-Stand underneath a pull-up bar, on a step if necessary.-Jump up to take hold of the pull-up bar with both hands, palms facing you. Your chin should already be at the height of the bar, at the top of the movement.-Lower yourself as slowly as you can, until arms are fully extended.-Release and repeat.Kick refined carbs to the curbIn order to lose fat, you need to ensure that you're adhering to a healthy diet. Make sure that sugar and refined carbohydrates (like pasta and bread) are sparse in your diet as the consumption of high-GI foods like these will encourage your body to store fat. Fill up on fibrous veg and high-protein sources like eggs and chicken, instead.Want more healthy eating and exercise tips? Subscribe to Women's Fitness. We'll give you 3 issues for £1.

Bikram yoga

Bikram yoga

16 April 2015

If you like your exercise hot and sweaty, then you'll love Bikram yoga. Not only does this class boast the usual benefits of yoga like improved flexibility and mood, but it's also great for the metabolism and gives you a serious muscular endurance workout. There's got to be a reason why there are so many adoring fans worldwide. If you want to take on the hardcore yoga class, check out our top tips for surviving your first class...What is Bikram yoga?Bikram yoga is 90-minute yoga class developed by Bikram Choudhury. It consists of a series of 26 postures. Easy, right? Not when the room is set to 40.6°C - the standard temperature for which Bikram yoga is practiced. Don't forget a towel!Why would I do this to myself?There are a range of benefits to doing Bikram yoga, from helping with weight loss and boosting metabolism to improving bodily pains and depression. During your session you will be exhausted and constantly wiping away that sweat, but as your session comes to an end, you’ll actually feel better than you did when you walked in. You will have worked your body and pushed yourself to its limits, and as a result you'll feel rejuvenated and restored.Top tipsStay hydrated. This doesn’t mean chugging a litre bottle of water when you’re walking in the studio door. Drink around 2 litres of water throughout the day before your session. And post-Bikram make sure you restore your electrolytes and rehydrate. Don’t eat 2 hours before the class. A full stomach can be very uncomfortable in the heat. You don’t want to be hungry either, so a small snack might be okay, but you just have to experiment and see what level of food intake is right for you. Show some skin. You are going to sweat, just accept it. So you want to wear light breathable clothing. Don’t be afraid to show some skin, yoga is not competitive - it’s about challenging yourself. Let it rain. As you sweat throughout the class, try not to constantly towel yourself off. Sweat is your body’s way of cooling you down, so embrace it. Come back. The first session is particularly hard as your body won't know what to expect. But make sure you come back for your second class - that's when the fun really starts! Be patient and enjoy yourself... and the sweat!

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Health Issues, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss0 Comments

Running tips for women

Running tips for women

16 April 2015

Going for a run is probably one of the most popular ways to get your workout on, whether it's hitting the roads or jumping on a treadmill when the weather's gross outside. If you sometimes find running a little tedious, why not challenge yourself to go faster or further?Here are our top tips to smash your run.To the gymWeight training could make you a better runner. A Norwegian study found that resistance training three times a week for eight weeks significantly improved running efficiency and endurance in well-trained, long-distance runners.Uphill battleWant to conquer the hills? To race uphill, run with a short stride while pushing off the balls of your feet and pumping your arms. Then relax your arms and use a longer stride to go downhill.Ready, set, splash!Getting wet could make you a better runner. Swimming increases your upper body strength, making your runs more efficient, while aqua jogging mimics your usual movement sans impact – reducing the risk of injury.Bright idea‘Watch your stance when running,’ tips Fitness First trainer Andy Hall. ‘Leaping forward and striding too far will drain your energy fast. Instead, make sure you stand tall and lean slightly forward, so when you feel like you’re going to fall, you step forward just enough to catch yourself. This should be the length of your stride.’Take fiveListen to your body! If you’re feeling under the weather or if your body is sore and ready for a rest, take a recovery day. Only you know if those aches and pains are from a good run or the sign you need to rest.Sand stormHere’s a good excuse to book a beach getaway – running on sand can improve your speed and muscle tone. A study from St Luke’s University Clinic in Belgium found that pounding the sand requires 1.6 times more energy than running on pavements as your body has to work harder to deal with the soft, unstable surface. That adds up to more defined muscles and a swifter run when you get back to solid ground. Neat!Drink upHydration is key for runners, but plain old water is best if you’re only doing short runs. Upgrade to a sports drink if you’re running for longer than an hour to help shuttle glucose to your muscles and combat fatigue.

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss, Weight Training0 Comments

Get your Adrenaline Rush

16 April 2015

The Adrenaline Rush obstacle race is running its 2015 London event at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, the home of Olympic and Paralympic athletes, on 30th May. While we might not be competing at the Games, it's close enough for us!Join in the action at the country’s most daring urban assault course as you take the Leap of Faith, Run the Gauntlet, Fly the Trapeze and test your courage and fitness with lots more obstacles featuring water, mud and even fire. We're particularly looking forward to Trench Town Rock - purely because of the name - and Trapezee - probably because it's the closest we'll ever get to our dreams of joining the circus!Choose from 5k or 10k depending on just how hardcore you feel, and afterwards celebrate conquering your fears with an ‘Adrenaline Shot’ before relaxing and grabbing a bite to eat in the event village.If you’re as pumped as we are, check out theadrenalinerush.com for more details on how you can apply. Enter on your own or if, like us, you need a bit of moral support you can also enter as a team of four. Plus each starter receives an awesome dry-fit t-shirt and medal – do you need another excuse?!Adrenaline Rush also runs in Glasgow on 25th Jul, Manchester on 1st August and Bristol on 15th August. Enter - we dare you!

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Health Issues, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss0 Comments

Make fitness your job!

Make fitness your job!

16 April 2015

The desire for a career in the fitness industry doesn’t necessarily manifest itself early on in life. In fact, many of us might not develop a passion for exercise until later in life; whether that’s due to getting into shape after having a baby, meeting a partner who introduces us to the joys of working out or catching the bug after taking up a fitness challenge. By this point, our lives may seem mapped out, and changing paths to turn your passion for fitness into a nine-to-five might notseem viable.But here at WF, we reckon it’s never too late. So we’ve rounded up the top fitness careers you could break into this year – yes, you! Get groups movingWhy? Les Mills has a reputation for running some of the best gym classes around. And whether you’re sculpting muscle in BodyPump or unwinding in BodyBalance, there’s one thing each class has in common: an instructor who’ll encourage you from beginning to end. ‘One of the best parts of being a Les Mills instructor is the social element,’ says Dave Kyle, head trainer at Les Mills UK (lesmills.com/uk). ‘You’ll make friends not only with fellow instructors, but class participants, too.’How? You’ll need a Gym Instructor qualification or equivalent, and you’ll need to be a member of the Register of Exercise Professionals (REPs). Some classes like BodyJam require the Level 2 Exercise to Music qualification, too. After this, you’ll need to take a module in whichever programme you’ll be teaching. A quick search online will help you find a course for you.One on oneWhy? Ask any personal trainer why they do what they do, and it’s likely they’ll say: to help others get in shape. ‘Being able to have a positive impact on people’s lives has to be the best thing about being a personal trainer,’ says Paul Dorkings of Premier Training International (premierglobal.co.uk).How? It’s a common misconception that once you’re qualified, you’re successful. ‘You also need to develop your business based on what your clients want and what helps them progress,’ Paul says. Fuse fitness and fashionWhy? Helping people feel and look great while they’re working out can really help keep them motivated to hit the gym regularly. Fitnesswear designer Charli Cohen (charli-cohen.com) knows all about this, having burst onto the fitness scene with her sport luxe range last year. ‘Designing fitnesswear opens the doors for potential innovation,’ says Charli. ‘The fitness industry is so friendly, inclusive and collaborative, too, in a way that the fashion industry sometimes isn’t.’How? Learn as much as you can about the industry first – speak to people in various areas to understand what’s necessary in releasing a line. ‘This will help you decide which role specifically you’d like to work in – such as product developer or designer – or if you’d prefer to take on all the challenges of setting up on your own,’ Charli explains. ‘And an industry focused course is important to team your creativity with strong technical skills, understanding industry standards and learning how to be commercially successful.’Set up your own studioWhy? If you live and breathe fitness, starting up your own studio is the perfect way to share your experience with others and spread that love. Lisa Campbell, who set up Yotopia yoga studio (yotopia.co.uk) in 2011, discovered her passion for yoga in a class and the rest is history. ‘I wanted to bring yoga to others who may have had misconceptions about it, as I had done,’ she says. ‘Now I love everything I do – every day is different, and having a business enables you to leverage from your strengths while providing a platform for development in other areas, too.’How? Being passionate goes a long way, but you’ll need a business head, too. ‘A big misconception about running your own studio in the fitness industry is that it’s not a business,’ Lisa says. ‘It’s a business like any other, and requires the discipline to match. It’s important to be excited by what you do as the business will reflect this.’Fix up sports starsWhy? Working in the fitness industry doesn’t necessarily mean getting down and dirty on the gym floor. Alison Rose, director of Coach House Sports Physiotherapy Clinic (cspc.co.uk), treats patients just like you and me, but is also responsible for the wellness of world-class athletes like Jessica Ennis-Hill and Dame Kelly Holmes. Her work makes it possible for our country’s sports stars to bring back those medals. ‘The best part of my job is seeing people get better,’ she says. ‘The more complex the injury or the longer someone’s been suffering, the more rewarding it is to see them recover – it gives you real job satisfaction.’How? Alison didn’t know she wanted to be a physio right away, but discovered it while training as a marathon runner at university. ‘I was doing a degree in anatomy and physiology, and by doing that, realised I wanted to go more down the physio route. So once I’d finished that degree, I took on another in physiotherapy.’ Aside from official qualifications, though, experience is paramount. ‘It’s such a competitive field, so anything that shows you have an interest and awareness will work in your favour,’ Alison adds. ‘I’d recommend volunteering, observing and taking in all aspects of physiotherapy.’Make a differenceWhy? Volunteering is a great way to gain experience. ‘It can help you develop new skills and experience a number of roles,’ says Emily Lewis, Head of Sport at Join In (joininuk.org), a London 2012 legacy charity. ‘Whether it’s coaching or managing accounts, there’s something for you.’ And Emily reckons it could really pay off. ‘Without volunteering I’d never have started working in the sports industry,’ she says. ‘As a result of the experience I’d gained volunteering as an assistant to the media officers at the World Cup, I was able to get a job in the media team at UK Athletics and have built my career from there.’How? One of the biggest misconceptions is that you need to come from a sporty background. ‘I’ve always loved sport as a spectator, but was never very good at it myself,’ Emily says. ‘I don’t think people realise how many different roles there are and the wide range of skills needed. I’d definitely suggest volunteering – volunteers are an important part of athletics both at grass roots and elite level.’

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Health Issues, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss0 Comments

Be:Fit returns to London this May

16 April 2015

Be:Fit - held this year at the Business Design Centre, Islington - is the women-only event that believes strong and fit is where it's at. Its mission is to inspire a nation of ladies determined to be the best they can be, while embracing their bodies and ditching the notion of cabbage soup diets. If you’re looking for inspiration or think you can help empower someone else, pop along – you won’t be disappointed.125 brands from the world of health and fitness have been confirmed so far, with experts from the likes of Living Juice, PUSH Mind & Body and The Saucy Fish Co giving their advice. We recommend visiting the Withings stand for a free health check and nutritional assessment from Oatly.When you’re done browsing the stands, there are a number of fitness classes to ‘try before you buy’ at the Reebok FitHub. Ever fancied a go at Insanity, or even a whole 30-minute workout dedicated to the song Uptown Funk? Now’s your chance. Classes are free but make sure to book online for £1 to secure your place.After an action-packed day, make sure you visit the Luxe Lounge for a sports massage, and re-fuel with a cooking demo from celebrity chef Sophie Michell and The Total Greek Yoghurt Kitchen. Learn how to create protein-packed dishes subbing in Greek yoghurt for less healthy ingredients for indulgent but virtuous meals.If you aren’t already sold, Be:Fit is also hosting talks from sporting celebs such as Becky Adlington and Victoria Pendleton to keep your motivation on track.For more information and the full list of exhibitors, check out befitlondon.com

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss0 Comments

Running tips for women

Running tips for women

13 April 2015

Going for a run is probably one of the most popular ways to get your workout on, whether it's hitting the roads or jumping on a treadmill when the weather's gross outside. If you sometimes find running a little tedious, why not challenge yourself to go faster or further?Here are our top tips to smash your run.To the gymWeight training could make you a better runner. A Norwegian study found that resistance training three times a week for eight weeks significantly improved running efficiency and endurance in well-trained, long-distance runners.Uphill battleWant to conquer the hills? To race uphill, run with a short stride while pushing off the balls of your feet and pumping your arms. Then relax your arms and use a longer stride to go downhill.Ready, set, splash!Getting wet could make you a better runner. Swimming increases your upper body strength, making your runs more efficient, while aqua jogging mimics your usual movement sans impact – reducing the risk of injury.Bright idea‘Watch your stance when running,’ tips Fitness First trainer Andy Hall. ‘Leaping forward and striding too far will drain your energy fast. Instead, make sure you stand tall and lean slightly forward, so when you feel like you’re going to fall, you step forward just enough to catch yourself. This should be the length of your stride.’Take fiveListen to your body! If you’re feeling under the weather or if your body is sore and ready for a rest, take a recovery day. Only you know if those aches and pains are from a good run or the sign you need to rest.Sand stormHere’s a good excuse to book a beach getaway – running on sand can improve your speed and muscle tone. A study from St Luke’s University Clinic in Belgium found that pounding the sand requires 1.6 times more energy than running on pavements as your body has to work harder to deal with the soft, unstable surface. That adds up to more defined muscles and a swifter run when you get back to solid ground. Neat!Drink upHydration is key for runners, but plain old water is best if you’re only doing short runs. Upgrade to a sports drink if you’re running for longer than an hour to help shuttle glucose to your muscles and combat fatigue.

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Health Issues, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss, Weight Training0 Comments

A moment on the piste

A moment on the piste

13 April 2015

Improver skier, H&F’s Fitness Editor, Sarah Ivory, headed to the French Alps for a taste of the actionI can sum up my skiing experience in two memories – one, being nicknamed ‘backward stacker’ as I plummeted down the mountain headfirst for the umpteenth time on a school ski trip and, two, shuffling down an icy slope on my backside, my boyfriend shouting words of encouragement in the distance. Even as I write this post, I’m ashamed to admit these things actually happened – they’re not my finest moments. But here’s the thing – I’m not a super-confident skier or a great lover of heights. Skiing is one of the activities that I’ve yet to crack, and that frustrates me. But I am determined to get better at it, mainly because there’s something about a winter break that really appeals – watching the sun rise over the mountains, hot chocolate on the slopes, the feeling of being at one with nature and, ahem, super-cool ski clothes.So, when I was invited to Megève, a popular ski resort in the Mont Blanc region of France, to test drive a new BMW X6 (I know – tough gig, right?), I saw my opportunity to improve. Why? Because Megève is a fairly low resort – the highest skiing is only 2353m – which is perfect for someone who doesn’t have a head for heights. Plus, I’d have just one day of skiing, which presented me with something that I like to call ‘the fear’ (that’s the feeling you get when you leave writing an essay until  deadline day – either suck it up and do it, or fail). And I got to do all of that while travelling around in a swanky off-road vehicle, boasting plenty of room for my ski stuff. Yeah, too right I was on that plane before you could shout ‘snow plough’!THE FITNESS FACTORHere’s the thing I love about skiing – it’s murder on your butt and legs. Staying upright on a pair of skis requires a lot of abdominal and lower body strength. Your chest, shoulder and arm muscles get a bit of a look-in when you use the poles, but this is primarily a sport that’s great for sculpting the lower half. As anyone who has spent a few hours in ski boots will attest, skiing is akin to sitting in the semi-squat position for hours on end – without a break. It is a seriously good strength session. Skiing also requires a high level of agility, balance and coordination, so it’s great for those looking to brush up on their fitness. And these reasons alone make it all the more appealing to me – I love a lower body workout, and my coordination skills leave a little to be desired! So when I arrived at Geneva airport, watching the ‘weekenders’ sail through Baggage Reclaim with their boot bags in hand, I made a pact – I had one day to max-out my leg muscles and I was going to make the most of it. There’d be no time to worry about finding my ‘ski legs’ on this trip.FULL STEAM AHEADAs luck would have it, I arrived in Megève after weeks of regular snow fall. Although it was dark by the time I got to the Hotel Alpaga, where I would be staying for the weekend, I could see droplets of snow hitting the rooftops outside the window. And that filled me with hope of great skiing conditions – something I’d never really experienced before. Blissfully, the hotel was an archetypal chocolate-box, alpine retreat – wood design, mountain views and a hot tub on the terrace– and it made me feel instantly relaxed. I was a world away from my normal pre-ski jitters. The hotel was also only a short drive away from a piste, with slopes accessible by lifts from close to the centre of town.  So the next day, we headed to Megève town centre at 9.30am sharp to pick up our skis and head for the slopes because, when you have just one day of skiing, you join the early crowd.SUCCESS AT LASTIt turns out that Megève is a great place for improver skiers. The chic village is paved with cobble stones and boasts pedestrian-only roads (something that’s surprisingly reassuring when you’re slowly lugging your skis across town). There are over 445km of marked runs and excellent snow cover on the piste, which is largely thanks to the high altitude of the resort. And the powdery white snow is so alluring that I felt obliged to ski on it instantly and without a second’s thought. With just six hours of snow sport to enjoy, I quickly got into the rhythm of skiing again and didn’t feel an inkling of fear once. I swished and swooshed down the slopes; at the back of the group but I was not the worst skier on the piste. In fact, going on a weekend break may have been the best thing that’s happened to my skiing ability. I felt strong and confident, stopping only to enjoy the breath-taking views of the sun creeping through the mountains. Bliss.After a full day of skiing, and a couple of hours spent at La Folie Douce (a cabaret-inspired club on the slopes that really has to be experienced to be believed), I felt successful, stress-free and as if I’d been away for months. So do I feel different after my whirlwind break? I certainly do. Travelling to France for a weekend of skiing is a unique experience, and one that I would thoroughly recommend to any nervous skier. I’m more confident on a pair of skis than I’ve ever been, and I feel thoroughly relaxed thanks to the crisp mountain air. Plus, I have the added bonus of knowing what it’s like to whizz around the mountain roads in a BMW X6. In fact, I feel fully immersed in the winter sport lifestyle. Hooray!  This trip was supported by BMW. For more information about the BMW X6, visit www.bmw.co.uk. To book a room at Hotel Alpaga, visit www.alpaga.com

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss0 Comments

Get your Adrenaline Rush

13 April 2015

The Adrenaline Rush obstacle race is running its 2015 London event at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, the home of Olympic and Paralympic athletes, on 30th May. While we might not be competing at the Games, it's close enough for us!Join in the action at the country’s most daring urban assault course as you take the Leap of Faith, Run the Gauntlet, Fly the Trapeze and test your courage and fitness with lots more obstacles featuring water, mud and even fire. We're particularly looking forward to Trench Town Rock - purely because of the name - and Trapezee - probably because it's the closest we'll ever get to our dreams of joining the circus!Choose from 5k or 10k depending on just how hardcore you feel, and afterwards celebrate conquering your fears with an ‘Adrenaline Shot’ before relaxing and grabbing a bite to eat in the event village.If you’re as pumped as we are, check out theadrenalinerush.com for more details on how you can apply. Enter on your own or if, like us, you need a bit of moral support you can also enter as a team of four. Plus each starter receives an awesome dry-fit t-shirt and medal – do you need another excuse?!Adrenaline Rush also runs in Glasgow on 25th Jul, Manchester on 1st August and Bristol on 15th August. Enter - we dare you!

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss0 Comments

Make fitness your job!

Make fitness your job!

13 April 2015

The desire for a career in the fitness industry doesn’t necessarily manifest itself early on in life. In fact, many of us might not develop a passion for exercise until later in life; whether that’s due to getting into shape after having a baby, meeting a partner who introduces us to the joys of working out or catching the bug after taking up a fitness challenge. By this point, our lives may seem mapped out, and changing paths to turn your passion for fitness into a nine-to-five might notseem viable.But here at WF, we reckon it’s never too late. So we’ve rounded up the top fitness careers you could break into this year – yes, you! Get groups movingWhy? Les Mills has a reputation for running some of the best gym classes around. And whether you’re sculpting muscle in BodyPump or unwinding in BodyBalance, there’s one thing each class has in common: an instructor who’ll encourage you from beginning to end. ‘One of the best parts of being a Les Mills instructor is the social element,’ says Dave Kyle, head trainer at Les Mills UK (lesmills.com/uk). ‘You’ll make friends not only with fellow instructors, but class participants, too.’How? You’ll need a Gym Instructor qualification or equivalent, and you’ll need to be a member of the Register of Exercise Professionals (REPs). Some classes like BodyJam require the Level 2 Exercise to Music qualification, too. After this, you’ll need to take a module in whichever programme you’ll be teaching. A quick search online will help you find a course for you.One on oneWhy? Ask any personal trainer why they do what they do, and it’s likely they’ll say: to help others get in shape. ‘Being able to have a positive impact on people’s lives has to be the best thing about being a personal trainer,’ says Paul Dorkings of Premier Training International (premierglobal.co.uk).How? It’s a common misconception that once you’re qualified, you’re successful. ‘You also need to develop your business based on what your clients want and what helps them progress,’ Paul says. Fuse fitness and fashionWhy? Helping people feel and look great while they’re working out can really help keep them motivated to hit the gym regularly. Fitnesswear designer Charli Cohen (charli-cohen.com) knows all about this, having burst onto the fitness scene with her sport luxe range last year. ‘Designing fitnesswear opens the doors for potential innovation,’ says Charli. ‘The fitness industry is so friendly, inclusive and collaborative, too, in a way that the fashion industry sometimes isn’t.’How? Learn as much as you can about the industry first – speak to people in various areas to understand what’s necessary in releasing a line. ‘This will help you decide which role specifically you’d like to work in – such as product developer or designer – or if you’d prefer to take on all the challenges of setting up on your own,’ Charli explains. ‘And an industry focused course is important to team your creativity with strong technical skills, understanding industry standards and learning how to be commercially successful.’Set up your own studioWhy? If you live and breathe fitness, starting up your own studio is the perfect way to share your experience with others and spread that love. Lisa Campbell, who set up Yotopia yoga studio (yotopia.co.uk) in 2011, discovered her passion for yoga in a class and the rest is history. ‘I wanted to bring yoga to others who may have had misconceptions about it, as I had done,’ she says. ‘Now I love everything I do – every day is different, and having a business enables you to leverage from your strengths while providing a platform for development in other areas, too.’How? Being passionate goes a long way, but you’ll need a business head, too. ‘A big misconception about running your own studio in the fitness industry is that it’s not a business,’ Lisa says. ‘It’s a business like any other, and requires the discipline to match. It’s important to be excited by what you do as the business will reflect this.’Fix up sports starsWhy? Working in the fitness industry doesn’t necessarily mean getting down and dirty on the gym floor. Alison Rose, director of Coach House Sports Physiotherapy Clinic (cspc.co.uk), treats patients just like you and me, but is also responsible for the wellness of world-class athletes like Jessica Ennis-Hill and Dame Kelly Holmes. Her work makes it possible for our country’s sports stars to bring back those medals. ‘The best part of my job is seeing people get better,’ she says. ‘The more complex the injury or the longer someone’s been suffering, the more rewarding it is to see them recover – it gives you real job satisfaction.’How? Alison didn’t know she wanted to be a physio right away, but discovered it while training as a marathon runner at university. ‘I was doing a degree in anatomy and physiology, and by doing that, realised I wanted to go more down the physio route. So once I’d finished that degree, I took on another in physiotherapy.’ Aside from official qualifications, though, experience is paramount. ‘It’s such a competitive field, so anything that shows you have an interest and awareness will work in your favour,’ Alison adds. ‘I’d recommend volunteering, observing and taking in all aspects of physiotherapy.’Make a differenceWhy? Volunteering is a great way to gain experience. ‘It can help you develop new skills and experience a number of roles,’ says Emily Lewis, Head of Sport at Join In (joininuk.org), a London 2012 legacy charity. ‘Whether it’s coaching or managing accounts, there’s something for you.’ And Emily reckons it could really pay off. ‘Without volunteering I’d never have started working in the sports industry,’ she says. ‘As a result of the experience I’d gained volunteering as an assistant to the media officers at the World Cup, I was able to get a job in the media team at UK Athletics and have built my career from there.’How? One of the biggest misconceptions is that you need to come from a sporty background. ‘I’ve always loved sport as a spectator, but was never very good at it myself,’ Emily says. ‘I don’t think people realise how many different roles there are and the wide range of skills needed. I’d definitely suggest volunteering – volunteers are an important part of athletics both at grass roots and elite level.’

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Health Issues, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss0 Comments

What’s your exercise excuse?

What’s your exercise excuse?

13 April 2015

We all know that regular exercise is good for us, but actually putting that knowledge into practice isn’t always so easy. While we may take out expensive gym memberships and splash the cash onnew workout gear in a bid to feel healthier and slimmer, sticking to an exercise regime for the long haul is another thing altogether. No matter how serious we are about achieving our goals, or how good our intentions, our get-fit resolutions can often slip off our to-do lists. Need some motivation to recharge your get-up-and-go? Health and wellness coach Joanne Henson dedicates her new book to doing just that. What’s Your Excuse For Not Getting Fit? (£4.99, amazon.co.uk) provides easy to follow advice and smart tips to stick with exercise long enough to see some pretty awesome results. ‘I wrote the book to help people take a fresh look at theirown self-sabotaging behaviours and limiting beliefs, and to motivate them to change their mindsets, and move forward,’ she explains. Here she shares the most common excuses and her simple solutions to stay on track.Excuse 1: I don’t have time to exerciseWorkouts don’t necessarily have to be lengthy or laborious if you’re looking to lose weight or get healthier. A short, sharp sweat sesh will see you bid farewell to hundreds of calories while targeting a whole range of different muscle groups. ‘Three to four times per week is ideal – this still leaves another three to four days a week when you don’t have to exercise. High-intensity interval training sessions could be as short as 10 minutes, and the best way to ensure that it gets done is to prioritise and diarise. And if you think you don’t have time, try keeping a log of how you spend your time and re-evaluate what’s important,’ says Joanne. Excuse 2: I live too far away from the gym Brrrr! When it’s freezing cold and chucking it down outside you’d probably prefer a date with your duvet over dragging yourself all the way to the gym – especially if it involves an epic commute. We get it. Even those of us with the loftiest intentions can falter when inconvenience thwarts our fitness plans. ‘There’s no point in joining a flash new gym if it’s a 15-minute drive away, which you might not fancy after a long day at work. Much better to join the more basic gym at the end of your road. Then you’ve only got to find time for the workout, not the workout and a journey,’ says Joanne. Gym still not near enough? Try out a range of fitness DVDs and apps that fit easily into your lifestyle.Excuse 3:  I’ve lost my fitness mojoHaving a dip in motivation every so often is normal and if that means you miss a few sessions, so be it – but don’t let that derail your efforts to get back on track. ‘If you do skip a few workouts, remember that the longer you leave it the harder it’s going to feel when you go back. And consider how far you’ve already come – do you really want to waste the effort you’ve already put in? Capitalise on the progress you’ve made so far and stick with it,’ advises Joanne. Excuse 4:  I find exercise boringExercise doesn’t have to be difficult and unpleasant. Ease yourself into it and up the ante when you’re ready. ‘Find something you enjoy. This is an obvious one, but so many people treat exercise as a form of punishment, as something to be endured not enjoyed. But there are dozens of different forms of exercise which you might find more fun, from dancing to rock climbing,’ says Joanne. And, if you get bored of your routine, switch things up a notch by trying new classes, working out different body parts and varying the intensity of your workout. Excuse 5: I’m not seeing resultsLet’s be realistic; you won’t see results overnight, but the more dedicated you become, the faster you’ll see improvements in your overall fitness and your figure. ‘Be patient, give it some time, and remember that exercise has long-term, ongoing health benefits beyond body shape,’ says Joanne. Try keeping a workout journal so you can chart your progress, writing down small achievements after every session, whether it’s going for two minutes longer on the treadmill or reaching a press-up PB. 

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss0 Comments

Currently Playing...

A moment on the piste

Added on 16 April 2015

View More Videos

BlogUpp!

Archives

April 2015
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  
Content Protected Using Blog Protector By: PcDrome.