Featured Stories
 

10 ways to be more active

1 Choose the furthest cornerInstead of fighting for parking spots closest to the supermarket doors, park your car as far away as possible. This gives you the opportunity to walk further, for longer – and it’s less stressful, too.2 Skip the liftStop taking the lift and take the stairs instead. It’ll get your heart pumping and body moving to build your fitness levels, plus climbing the stairs requires your bum, thigh and calf muscles to engage, helping to tone and sculpt your legs – a win-win!3 Walk the last stopIf you commute to work by bus, jump off one stop early – or even two! – to increasethe distance you walk. Not only will thisadd in some extra cardio exercise to yourday – particularly if you march at a fast pace – it’ll burn a few extra calories, too.  4 Get pedallingBoost your fitness by cycling to and from work. It’s a great way to get two cardio workouts into your day without having to take time out to exercise. Cycling is also a great way to tone up and keep those calories burning 5 Use your lunch hourInstead of staying glued to your computer screen, use your lunch hour for some retail therapy or a wander in the park. Just 20 minutes walking around the block, will help perk you up and boost your motivation. And, of course, it will add that extra bit of physical activity into your day. In fact, according to a recent study conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratoryin California, walking briskly can lower your risk of high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes as much as running. Walk on!6 Leave your car at homeIf you have kids, walk them to school instead of driving, if it’s close enough. Not only will you start your day with a spring in your step, but walking to school will also encourage your kids to be more active, and it also helps reduce pollution. If walking isn’t an option, why not take them to the park after school or to the swings to play? And make sure you run around as much as your kids do!7 Stand up more!While talking on the phone, whether at home or in the office, get out of your chair and stand up or pace up and down. As well as helping you to focus on the conversation, this can have real benefits for your health. A study by Dr John Buckley and a team of researchers from the University of Chester proved that standing for a total of three hours each day will burn up an extra 144 calories. Over a year, that adds up to about 30,000 more calories or eight pounds of fat!8 Be a touristInstead of the usual catch-up over coffee and cake or dinner, why not arrangea jog around the park with a friend insteador book onto a sightseeing tour around your nearest city. You’ll still have a chance to chat, but you’ll get in a bit of extra cardio, too.9 Get your groove onSpending your evenings slumped in front of the TV after a stressful day at work? Why not create a playlist of some of your favourite songs and have a dance around your bedroom for 15 minutes (or longer!) instead? Or look up dance classes you can join in your area. Not only does dancinghelp boost self-confidence, but it’s a great chance to get a sweat on and burn some extra calories. A study published by the American Council on Exercise found that dance-based workouts can burn 200-400 calories per hour – almost as much as you burn swimming, cycling or walking. 10 Invest in a pedometerRecord the number of steps you take each day with a pedometer. Then challenge yourself to increase the number every day or have a competition with your partneror friend to see who can bank the most steps. This will boost your motivationand get you more active

The 10 exercise commandments

When you first started working out, you were probably up to your eyeballs in exercise rules: engage the core, don’t strain your neck, don’t let the knees go past the toes and so on. Newcomers to exercise tend to make the extra effort to stay on the straight and narrow when it comes to following these guidelines, but those who are incredibly well-versed in working out often forget these all-important rules – and sometimes going back to basics is just what you need to make your workout as efficient as possible. Here are the 10 commandments of training and why you should never (ever!) forget them.1 Don’t lock outKeeping your elbows and knees slightly soft, even during full extension, is in your interest not only in terms of joint health, but also in making your workout more effective. ‘Not locking out when lifting weights will prevent joint deterioration and reduce your chances of joint-related niggles and injuries,’ explains personal trainer Dave Fletcher (theodysseyway.co.uk). Keeping your joints soft also calls for muscle recruitment throughout the entire move, as it doesn’t allow them to catch a break at the top of the motion. More work equals better results, right?2 Eat wiseYou don’t need us to tell you not to eat heavy meals too close to a workout – you’ll soon feel it if you do. The reason you might feel a little worse for wear when taking on a gruelling session after a big eat is because, when you exercise, the blood flow is directed to the muscles that are working. This means there’s limited flow to the digestive system – something’s got to give.3 Give yourself a liftSquats are a big deal now – it’s a fact. While serious lifters have seen the squat as the holy grail of exercise for years, initiatives like the squat challenge have really popularised the move. But a lot of people struggle to perfect the technique and are, as a result, missing out on maximum results. ‘For most people, squatting with your heels raised will dramatically improve your range of motion,’ Dave explains. ‘If you have tight calves, you tend to lean forwards during a squat and unnecessarily load the lower back, so by raising the heels (on a plank or weight discs, for example) you allow a greater activation of the glutes, quads and hamstrings (bottom and thigh muscles), increasing the effectiveness of the move while reducing the risk of strain to the lower back.’4 Practise your turn-outWe’re not talking ballerina-worthy turn-out, but pointing your toes out just slightly while performing resistance exercises gives you an extra bit of stability that could make all the difference. Keeping your toes pointing forwards might seem like the safest option, but, according to Dave, the stance can feel unbalanced and unnatural since the hips tendto rotate outwards a little.5 Have a breakThe jury always seems to be out on rest days, with different people recommending different things. Should you skip the gym if you feel rubbish, or just power through like a trooper? And how many rest days should you have per week? Either way, one thing’s for sure: you do need rest days, especially between strength sessions or sessions that target the same muscles again. You’re seriously compromising your safety by overdoing it. Even if you feel okay, your muscles will still be recovering, and won’t be able to perform to the maximum until they’ve been rebuilt.6 Perfect your postureIt’s not as simple as standing up straight when performing your exercises, although this is pretty important, too. Having good body alignment can boost your progress by helping you perform exercises with better form, so working on your postural alignment outside of the gym is crucial. ‘Make sure you put the time in away from your workouts, too, by stretching, foam rolling and stopping yourself from slouching when you sit down,’ advises Dave.7 Engage your coreThis is probably one of the first rules you learn when you start exercising. Engaging the core almost goes without saying these days, right? But it really is at the centre of everything and ensures your upper and lower body work in synergy, taking the strain away from the lower back and enabling you to lift heavier weights. And you know what that means? Better results.8 Refuel post-workoutEating healthily in general is pretty important, but for those who go hard at it in the gym, you need to pay extra attention to mealtimes, too. You’ve probably seen those hardcore gym-goers glugging their protein shakes before they’ve even left the changing rooms, and here’s why: after a workout, the muscles are primed to absorb protein, so you want to take advantage of this. We’re not saying everyone should be on the shakes, but make sure you go for a protein-heavy meal like chicken or fish after you’ve exercised.9 Prepare and recover properlyLet’s be honest, we can all be a little guilty of skipping warm-ups and cool-downs, even though we know we shouldn’t. And while we know stretching after exercise helps to reduce injury and aches, did you know that warming up efficiently before a workout actually makes the workout easier. How? Stretching dynamically pre-workout, in similar movement patterns to those you’re about to perform, means your muscles will be more elastic and the blood will already be flowing. ‘Stick to dynamic stretches before a workout and static ones after,’ Dave adds.10 Stay hydratedDrinking enough water is important, regardless of how often you exercise – the body is primarily made up of fluid, after all. If you start to feel thirsty at any point, then you’re actually already dehydrated. And, while rehydrating is easy enough, taking preventative measuresby ensuring you never reach the point of thirst is even better. Even minor dehydration can affect your endurance and blood flow. The rule? The more you tend to sweat, the more you should drink throughout the day. So keep a bottle of water on you at all times. 

Heather Watson Q&A

Firstly, a bit of background. The Fed Cup by BNP Paribas, as it’s officially known, is like a World Cup of tennis. It’s the world’s largest annual international team competition in women’s sport and 102 nations have entered this year. It’s the women’s equivalent of the Davis Cup – a team-based tournament where you play in group matches according to the zone in the world you come from and how you did in the same tournament the previous year (it’s pretty complicated, so see fedcup.com for more info). There are six people in a team and Great Britain are competing in Europe/Africa Group 1 round robin for the 12th consecutive year. They’re playing their first match tomorrow, February 4 against South Africa… H&F: How important is it in your annual tennis calendar?Heather Watson: ‘I always play in the Fed Cup – I’ve played every time I’ve been invited and love to represent my country. I’m really looking forward to it. It doesn’t have anything to do with our rankings though.’ H&F: Judy Murray (Andy’s mum) is a non-playing team captain. What does that involve?Heather Watson: ‘Judy picks the team and is great at mentoring us and motivating us to do well – she has a great personality and is fun and helps the team gel, but when we’re on court, she has a calm demeanor. She’s a coach as well – she sits courtside and goes through the match with us and gives us tips.’ H&F: Has Jo Konta’s recent success inspired you?Heather Watson: ‘Jo’s done brilliantly in Australia. I felt it coming as I knew how good she’s been. She’s smashed it out the park and is keeping it rolling – she got to the fourth round at the US Open too and has heaps of confidence right now. It’s great for our team spirit.’ H&F: It’s been reported that Jo Konta's mental strength has improved a lot since working with a mind coach. Do you have one too?Heather Watson: ‘Yes, it’s a really important part of the game. I got one a few years ago, but it’s a different one from Jo’s.’ H&F: What last-minute preparation have you been doing?Heather Watson: ‘I’ll still be doing three to four hours of tennis and two hours of fitness training a day until two days before. I’ll probably have the afternoon off the day before though.’ H&F: How do you rate the chances of the British team?Heather Watson: ‘It’s always such a lottery as the players can be a lot more inspired playing for their country and in a team so you get some unusual results. We have South Africa and Georgia in our group, but don’t know the actual players yet. Anything could happen!’ H&F: What’s next after the Fed Cup?Heather Watson: ‘The Mexican Open in Acapulco at the end of February, the Monterrey Open in Mexico after that, then the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, California in March.’ Interview courtesy of the LTA (lta.org.uk)@FedCup @BritishTennis

Get your tickets for The Color Run now

The Color Run presented by Skittles - dubbed the happiest 5k on the planet - is back this year. And if it wasn’t already one of the most fun events around, they've added a new tropical twist for 2016.In January 2012 the first Color Run took place in the United States after the founder Travis Snyder had been inspired by the Indian Holi Festival. He then decided to mix colour with running, and since then it has exploded across the globe into what is now the single largest event series in the world, boasting over 300 events taking place in over 50 countries in 2014.Last year more than 59,000 runners took part in events across the UK - London alone saw 19,500 people take to Wembley Park to spread colour, happiness and joy while getting a little exercise, too.Participants are encouraged to take part in whatever way suits them, be it running, walking, dancing, skipping, or even partying through the course. The aim is to just have fun and get totally and utterly covered in colour. Sounds like an ideal way to work out to us.There are no timers or stopwatches, so you can just have fun soaking up the celebrations, atmosphere and, of course, colour. There is a surprise waiting at the end, though, so we wouldn’t suggest taking too long if you like to party.Everyone starts in a plain white t-shirt, and throughout the route there are different zones at each kilometre to paint every runner in an array of colours. There are only two rules: The first is to make sure you are wearing white at the start line and the second is to finish the event plastered in colour. And trust us, you won't be having any trouble there.The paint which forms the basis of The Color Run is 100 per cent natural, made from food grade cornstarch and will cause no harm to your skin or the environment. So there is no excuse not to get absolutely covered!This year there is also a new Tropicolor Rainbow Zone where a mixture of colours will be ready and waiting to cover participants from head to toe, while island- style music and palm trees will set the scene for a real fun feel on the way to the epic finish festival.But the party doesn’t stop when the course comes to an end. There is a festival with DJs, Color Run MCs, the legendary ‘Color Throws’ as well as amazing giveaways. Everyone is guaranteed to have an unforgettable experience and the best ever post-race party as a massive reward.There are also loads of goodies to get your hands on, limited edition t-shirts, Tropicolor headbands, fun temporary tattoos and more.The events this year are as follows:Sunday 12thJune 2016 - London, WembleySaturday 2ndJuly 2016 - Manchester, Etihad CampusSunday 17thJuly 2016 - City of GlasgowSaturday 20thAugust 2016 - Birmingham, NECSaturday 17thSeptember 2016 - Brighton, Madeira DriveDon’t wait around - grab your friends and get your tickets now if you don't want to miss out on the happiest run around.

Q&A with British ski mountaineer Ursula Moore

 What is ski mountaineering?‘It involves climbing up mountains with skins on the bottom of your skis, then taking them off when you get to the top and skiing down. Sometimes you have to scramble along a rocky ridge, so you may have to take your skis off and strap them to your backpack and do that bit on foot. Some team races require you to rope yourselves together on tricky bits, for safety. Competitions have different disciplines: there are sprint ones lasting just a few minutes, individual ones that last about two and a half to three hours, and team events that can last from three to twenty hours. Individual races have around 2,000-2,500m of vertical ascent, while team races tend to have more.’How did you get into ski mountaineering?‘I’ve skied from a young age with family. In my teens, I started doing ski mountaineering and ski touring trips where you ski across the mountains from hut to hut. This gave access to a lot more fresh snow, stunning dawn views and quirky mountain huts. On one of these trips, I met a British mountain guide who was in the Men’s Ski Mountaineering Team. I was very fit from rowing and triathlon training at university and he saw someone who enjoyed pushing themselves in not-so-perfect weather conditions! He suggested I contact the women’s team captain to discuss getting involved in racing, so I did.The next season, in 2013, the women’s team were short of people for the World Championships in France and it was on this big stage that I did my first race – with some second-hand kit and no idea about fuelling and pacing for a race at altitude. I can’t say I enjoyed it – I was completely exhausted and out of my depth, but the atmosphere and support from others was amazing. Through the week, I gained confidence with tips and practice from the team and left near the bottom of the rankings, but hooked. Each season has built from there.The race season runs from January to late April, with the longer races tending to come at the end of the season. Each season offers a different challenge, with a World Championships every other year and the ‘Grand Course’ races [the most important team races in the ski mountaineering series] to pick off, along with as many smaller local races as you can afford to fly out to.’Tell us about a typical day’s racing‘When I’m competing in a race such as the Pierra Menta in France [see pierramenta.com – a four-day staged two-person team race, with four to five hours of racing each day, in the beautiful Areches-Beaufort area of the Savoie region of France; areches-beaufort.com], I wake up at around 5am as the race starts are early, and often while it’s still dark. The four days of racing are fully catered, so we can focus on racing and sleeping. I always have breakfast at least two hours before the start, around 5.30 or 6am. At the Pierra Menta, they have amazing muesli that they’ve soaked in yoghurt overnight – it’s delicious and surprisingly easy to eat on a nervous stomach. After breakfast, we sort our kit and check that we have all the necessary bits, including avalanche rescue gear, transceiver, harness, obligatory spare layers and lots of jelly babies! Then we make a final decision on how many layers to wear and how much water to take, depending on the weather forecast. We have little pockets in the front of our suits where we stuff snacks that we can get at with gloves on when we’re on the go.Then we head to the start line to get there about 30 minutes before the race starts. You need time to warm up but don’t want to tire yourself out or get cold waiting, so it’s a fine balance. About 15 minutes before the race, I’ll share an energy bar with my team mate. After eating lots in the morning and feeling nervous, I often need to use the loo several times!’What are your race tactics?‘The Pierra Menta is particularly tough for women because the time cut-offs apply to men and women alike and are not a set time, but are a percentage of the fastest men’s team time. This means that there are far fewer women’s than men’s teams competing. The race start is always nerve-wracking. You can lose a lot of time here if you get stuck behind someone or your skins get knocked off in the mass start. The team soon settles into a rhythm we can sustain for the next two to eight hours, though.You go through ups and downs in how you feel, energy levels and perspective. Stunning surroundings help take your mind off your legs. The downhill is my favourite bit – and the section where the Brits tend to pick up places.Once the race is underway, I eat and drink about 100 calories-worth of food every half an hour (three to four jelly babies/an energy gel/nuts and chocolate chips) alternating between solid slower-release food such as nuts/dried fruit and “liquid” quick-release food such as energy gels. Most people find that if they don’t eat any solid food, they get terrible stomach upsets. I’ve learnt from my first race, where I didn’t manage to eat because I couldn’t access my food without stopping, and my water tube froze. I have food in a front pocket and water in a rucksack hydration system. We run the water tube inside our suits to keep it from freezing.’   Can you tell us more about the kit you use?‘To allow you to walk uphill on skis, you stick skins on the bottom of them. These are synthetic strips of material that allow you to slide forwards, but help stop your skis going backwards. You then peel these off when you get to the top of your climb so you can ski downhill. Ski mountaineering boots are very light and are flexible for going uphill, but you can then ‘lock’ them into a more rigid mode to give you more support for going downhill. The skis are also very thin and light and don’t feel as stable as on-piste downhill skis. You unlock the back of the binding for going uphill, then lock your heel in for going downhill.’Is teamwork very important?‘Yes – extremely. This is the start of my fourth season racing and, with no World Championships this year, our big target is the Patroilles des Glaciers [one of the Grand Course races where you have to cover 53km from Zermatt to Verbier in Switzerland in one day] which has been described as the toughest team race in the world! I’ll be racing with two other women from the British team. We have multiple “training” races – both skiing and adventure races – planned to help us to work out our individual strengths and weaknesses and how to support each other. In each season, these weaknesses may vary depending on base fitness, injury or even who has the newest kit! The fastest person uphill is allowed to carry more weight for the team or to use a ‘bungee’ rope to help pull the others up behind them. This has to be worked out carefully so as not to tire out the ‘strong one’. On the way down, especially if roped together, the order of the skiers is important to allow a smooth descent.’ Are you an amateur or a professional?‘Unfortunately, I’m not a full-time athlete and have to fit training around my job as a junior doctor in Newcastle. This can mean an erratic schedule based on my shifts, but I train at least six days a week, including with my local running and triathlon clubs, and do fell running and adventure races at weekends. I hate gyms and have a turbo trainer in the garage for a late night cycle in front of a movie. If I have a thirteen-hour shift, I’ll either fit in something in the morning before I go or choose to run to work and back to get the time in. Using my commute like this gives me more time in the day, leaving me a crucial eight hours of sleep! I prefer evening training as it tends to be with other people, making it easier to push yourself – but the social aspect does take up more time.’What happens at the end of the races?‘By the time you finish, you’ve been racing for several hours and are shattered. There’s usually a lot of food at the finish line – nuts, chocolate squares, cakes, fruit gels and hot fruit tea, but you have to be careful not to eat too much as your body’s not ready for it yet. Then there’s normally a carb-heavy lunch and prize-giving – which on weekend races sets us up for our dash back to the airport to get back for work!’ How do you fuel yourself when training?‘I’m hungry all the time. For breakfast, I’ll have a big bowel of porridge with half milk, half water and raisins and nuts mixed through. I always take my own lunch and snacks to work. These include a slice of toasted malt loaf with peanut butter; banana on crackerbreads with honey or peanut butter; or nuts. I like making my own vegetable soups from whatever veg is in the fridge and also have a bread roll, apple and a yoghurt for lunch. I usually have two veggie evening meals a week (with nuts or pulses for the protein – things like stuffed peppers or aubergine bake) and the rest are mostly chicken- or fish-based, such as chicken curry. I cook sauces from scratch so I know what I’m eating and can make sure I’m getting enough protein, but I’m not a label watcher.’ Tips for those who want to give ski mountaineering a tryWhy not go and watch the hugely inspiring Pierra Menta race and soak up the amazing atmosphere? It’s on from March 9-12, 2016. Stay in nearby Areches (just two hours from Geneva) and have a go at ski touring yourself – book with a local ski instructor (esf-areches-beaufort.com).Ursula and her team compete in the Scottish skimo race series (skimoscotland.co.uk), which is going from strength to strength and is a great way into the sport for any aspiring racers – you don’t need dedicated race kit to give it a go.For more information, check out Team GB’s Facebook page: GBskimo and thebmc.co.uk.     

Top facts about exercising in the cold

Separate the freezing facts from fiction with the low down from a Fitness First expert:1. Burning more calories in the cold is actually a myth, the body actually uses more energy cooling down in the heat than it does in the cold.2. As per point one, exercising in colder temperatures is healthier than exercising in summer because we use less energy to warm up in winter than we do to cool down in summer3. As per evolutionary theory, we tend to store more fat in winter to keep ourselves warm and with that comes weight gain, so exercising in the winter is actually more relevant for that reason4. In the winter most of us divulge in alcohol and enjoy ourselves more, alcohol actually encourages heat loss in the body, so when we do exercise outside it makes it harder to stay warm5. In summer we drink a lot of water, whereas in winter we’re not as aware that we’re dehydrated. This is dangerous as when we reach this point the body loses the ability to regulate temperature, so hydrating in winter is actually more important6. Static stretching in the cold brings an injury risk, because muscles have the same elastic properties as a band if you stretch too quickly without the appropriate range of movement, the muscle can tear. Aim for dynamic movements as these will increase blood flow to muscle and therefore warm them quicker, whilst improving joint flexibility as well. They will also activate more muscles rather than isolated stretching.7. Protect hands and feet. Heat loss tends to come from the hands, feet and head, so wear gloves, good socks and a hat and you’ll tend to find it easier to regulate temperature. It’s not about wearing a fleece, it’s about protecting the places that heat escapes from.8. Stay dry. If you run in the winter and you sweat into cotton, it will stay wet and won’t dry. Therefore your body struggles to heat up due to the wet cotton. Wear dry fit material which will dry quickly as you work out.9. Avoid over dressing. A lot of people wrap up warm when they work out outside. You risk excessive sweating which can cause dehydration and use excessive amounts of energy. It’s ok to start a run cold as you will warm up and your body will self-regulate your temperature.10. There is a risk of slipping in the winter so wear a rubber studded sole to ensure you have grip.

The 10 exercise commandments

When you first started working out, you were probably up to your eyeballs in exercise rules: engage the core, don’t strain your neck, don’t let the knees go past the toes and so on. Newcomers to exercise tend to make the extra effort to stay on the straight and narrow when it comes to following these guidelines, but those who are incredibly well-versed in working out often forget these all-important rules – and sometimes going back to basics is just what you need to make your workout as efficient as possible. Here are the 10 commandments of training and why you should never (ever!) forget them.1 Don’t lock outKeeping your elbows and knees slightly soft, even during full extension, is in your interest not only in terms of joint health, but also in making your workout more effective. ‘Not locking out when lifting weights will prevent joint deterioration and reduce your chances of joint-related niggles and injuries,’ explains personal trainer Dave Fletcher (theodysseyway.co.uk). Keeping your joints soft also calls for muscle recruitment throughout the entire move, as it doesn’t allow them to catch a break at the top of the motion. More work equals better results, right?2 Eat wiseYou don’t need us to tell you not to eat heavy meals too close to a workout – you’ll soon feel it if you do. The reason you might feel a little worse for wear when taking on a gruelling session after a big eat is because, when you exercise, the blood flow is directed to the muscles that are working. This means there’s limited flow to the digestive system – something’s got to give.3 Give yourself a liftSquats are a big deal now – it’s a fact. While serious lifters have seen the squat as the holy grail of exercise for years, initiatives like the squat challenge have really popularised the move. But a lot of people struggle to perfect the technique and are, as a result, missing out on maximum results. ‘For most people, squatting with your heels raised will dramatically improve your range of motion,’ Dave explains. ‘If you have tight calves, you tend to lean forwards during a squat and unnecessarily load the lower back, so by raising the heels (on a plank or weight discs, for example) you allow a greater activation of the glutes, quads and hamstrings (bottom and thigh muscles), increasing the effectiveness of the move while reducing the risk of strain to the lower back.’4 Practise your turn-outWe’re not talking ballerina-worthy turn-out, but pointing your toes out just slightly while performing resistance exercises gives you an extra bit of stability that could make all the difference. Keeping your toes pointing forwards might seem like the safest option, but, according to Dave, the stance can feel unbalanced and unnatural since the hips tendto rotate outwards a little.5 Have a breakThe jury always seems to be out on rest days, with different people recommending different things. Should you skip the gym if you feel rubbish, or just power through like a trooper? And how many rest days should you have per week? Either way, one thing’s for sure: you do need rest days, especially between strength sessions or sessions that target the same muscles again. You’re seriously compromising your safety by overdoing it. Even if you feel okay, your muscles will still be recovering, and won’t be able to perform to the maximum until they’ve been rebuilt.6 Perfect your postureIt’s not as simple as standing up straight when performing your exercises, although this is pretty important, too. Having good body alignment can boost your progress by helping you perform exercises with better form, so working on your postural alignment outside of the gym is crucial. ‘Make sure you put the time in away from your workouts, too, by stretching, foam rolling and stopping yourself from slouching when you sit down,’ advises Dave.7 Engage your coreThis is probably one of the first rules you learn when you start exercising. Engaging the core almost goes without saying these days, right? But it really is at the centre of everything and ensures your upper and lower body work in synergy, taking the strain away from the lower back and enabling you to lift heavier weights. And you know what that means? Better results.8 Refuel post-workoutEating healthily in general is pretty important, but for those who go hard at it in the gym, you need to pay extra attention to mealtimes, too. You’ve probably seen those hardcore gym-goers glugging their protein shakes before they’ve even left the changing rooms, and here’s why: after a workout, the muscles are primed to absorb protein, so you want to take advantage of this. We’re not saying everyone should be on the shakes, but make sure you go for a protein-heavy meal like chicken or fish after you’ve exercised.9 Prepare and recover properlyLet’s be honest, we can all be a little guilty of skipping warm-ups and cool-downs, even though we know we shouldn’t. And while we know stretching after exercise helps to reduce injury and aches, did you know that warming up efficiently before a workout actually makes the workout easier. How? Stretching dynamically pre-workout, in similar movement patterns to those you’re about to perform, means your muscles will be more elastic and the blood will already be flowing. ‘Stick to dynamic stretches before a workout and static ones after,’ Dave adds.10 Stay hydratedDrinking enough water is important, regardless of how often you exercise – the body is primarily made up of fluid, after all. If you start to feel thirsty at any point, then you’re actually already dehydrated. And, while rehydrating is easy enough, taking preventative measuresby ensuring you never reach the point of thirst is even better. Even minor dehydration can affect your endurance and blood flow. The rule? The more you tend to sweat, the more you should drink throughout the day. So keep a bottle of water on you at all times. 

Heather Watson Q&A

Firstly, a bit of background. The Fed Cup by BNP Paribas, as it’s officially known, is like a World Cup of tennis. It’s the world’s largest annual international team competition in women’s sport and 102 nations have entered this year. It’s the women’s equivalent of the Davis Cup – a team-based tournament where you play in group matches according to the zone in the world you come from and how you did in the same tournament the previous year (it’s pretty complicated, so see fedcup.com for more info). There are six people in a team and Great Britain are competing in Europe/Africa Group 1 round robin for the 12th consecutive year. They’re playing their first match tomorrow, February 4 against South Africa… H&F: How important is it in your annual tennis calendar?Heather Watson: ‘I always play in the Fed Cup – I’ve played every time I’ve been invited and love to represent my country. I’m really looking forward to it. It doesn’t have anything to do with our rankings though.’ H&F: Judy Murray (Andy’s mum) is a non-playing team captain. What does that involve?Heather Watson: ‘Judy picks the team and is great at mentoring us and motivating us to do well – she has a great personality and is fun and helps the team gel, but when we’re on court, she has a calm demeanor. She’s a coach as well – she sits courtside and goes through the match with us and gives us tips.’ H&F: Has Jo Konta’s recent success inspired you?Heather Watson: ‘Jo’s done brilliantly in Australia. I felt it coming as I knew how good she’s been. She’s smashed it out the park and is keeping it rolling – she got to the fourth round at the US Open too and has heaps of confidence right now. It’s great for our team spirit.’ H&F: It’s been reported that Jo Konta's mental strength has improved a lot since working with a mind coach. Do you have one too?Heather Watson: ‘Yes, it’s a really important part of the game. I got one a few years ago, but it’s a different one from Jo’s.’ H&F: What last-minute preparation have you been doing?Heather Watson: ‘I’ll still be doing three to four hours of tennis and two hours of fitness training a day until two days before. I’ll probably have the afternoon off the day before though.’ H&F: How do you rate the chances of the British team?Heather Watson: ‘It’s always such a lottery as the players can be a lot more inspired playing for their country and in a team so you get some unusual results. We have South Africa and Georgia in our group, but don’t know the actual players yet. Anything could happen!’ H&F: What’s next after the Fed Cup?Heather Watson: ‘The Mexican Open in Acapulco at the end of February, the Monterrey Open in Mexico after that, then the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, California in March.’ Interview courtesy of the LTA (lta.org.uk)@FedCup @BritishTennis

Interview: Barbara Currie’s Yoga Secrets

For almost 40 years, leading UK yoga guru, Barbara Currie, has been spreading the yoga word with her yoga books, videos, classes and TV appearances. Now the incredibly youthful Currie is launching a new You Tube yoga channel – Barbara Currie Yoga, to help as many people as possible reap the incredible benefits of yoga. We caught up with her to find out more. Is yoga your secret to staying healthy and youthful?“I teach yoga everyday, five times a day. I don’t do any other exercise apart from swimming occasionally and walking. I’m energetic and everything is working well health-wise, so I’d have to say yoga is my secret.” What are you other anti-ageing secrets?“I don’t have any really. I have a healthy diet, excluding additives by eating a ‘stone age diet’ of only chicken, fish, veg, fruit and salads.”Why is yoga a good complement to a regular fitness regime?“It keeps you flexible because it helps the spine. You’ll increase your level of focus and, most importantly, sleep better.” What are the best yoga postures for building fitness?“All yoga helps. It really depends on what you consider as fitness. Overall it will improve your energy and ability without strain.” What should readers look for in a yoga class if they’re just starting out?“You know you’ve found the right class when you feel good afterwards. You should feel no strain during or after. If you didn’t enjoy it, find another class.” Tell us about your new Youtube channel – what will it offer?“I started my YouTube channel in response to many of my students asking for yoga which they could do a little bit of everyday. The YouTube videos are three to five minutes long and allow you to gradually learn yoga at your own pace, with short and manageable sections each day. This means you can gradually tone and firm your muscles and joints and keep them flexible, focusing on different sections each day to make sure the whole body is covered. You can take it at an individual speed and learn to practise yoga everyday, in your own home, whenever you have the chance or would like to do a short, weekly YouTube-led session.” www.youtube.com/BarbaraCurrieYoga

4 Best on-demand fitness networks

GREAT FOR gym fitness goalsMATT ROBERTS BODY.NETWORK£15 per month; Body.NetworkThe Netflix of the workout world, Body Network boasts a holistic mix of health and fitness videos that have been put together by some of the UK’s leading experts. Not just workouts, the network also provides rehabilitation programmes, a tri-part introduction to mindfulness and meditation, and nutritional programmes. It has everything that you need to hone a fitter, healthier and more efficient body. Unlike other on-demand services, this network caters for outdoor as well as indoor exercisers. The 10K training plan from running expert Charlie Webster is designed to help you hit a 6.2-mile goal, including interval workout audio sessions that you can take with you on your run. The Get Fit for Cycling series aims to improve cycling performance, a great option for off-season bike training. And if you don’t care about exercising outside, there’s a host of popular gym and home workouts, too, such as Pilates, yoga, post-natal exercise and boxing programmes. A lot of the workouts are periodised in that they start at a beginner level and progress to advanced training, which means you don’t only work out, but also learn the techniques needed to perform exercise properly. The Body Network educates as well as makes you sweat!GREAT FOR performance goalsBEACH BODY ON DEMAND£2.99 per week; beachbody.co.ukBeach Body pioneers some of the most popular workouts worldwide – we’re talking Insanity, PiYo, P90X – so this really is the place to come if you want to be ahead of the game. There are ‘sneak peek’ workouts of up-and-coming programmes, such as Shaun T’s Cize or Hammer & Chisel, in which you get to try the latest sessions first. Plus, Q&A videos with the top trainers reveal a few insider secrets! And if you don’t have a clue what workout to do, there’s even a ‘challenge du jour’ session, which will keep you on your toes every day you log in. The best bit, however, is that Beach Body On Demand (BOD) isn’t exclusively for the super-fit; it’s great for all levels, whether you follow Autumn Calabrese’s Active Maternity programme or the sports-friendly Insanity The Asylum schedule. A lot of the programmes are time-orientated – there’s the 21-day fix or the 90-day P90x plan – so it’s a great website to sign up to if you have a shape-up goal for 2016. It’s really easy to use and you can even stream it via the On Demand app to devices such as tablets, Apple TV or Amazon Fire TV. Handy.GREAT FOR shape-up goalsYOOGAIA£14.99 per month; yoogaia.comCan’t find a yoga class that you love? You need to log onto Yoogaia. The online yoga studio provides live classes across a range of low-impact disciplines including Pilates, barre, core exercise and, of course, yoga. There’s a packed schedule with daily workouts such as Yin Yoga Stretch or Barre Cardio Express available for you to book onto. The live workouts happen via your webcam – the instructor can see you and you can see the instructor but exercisers can’t see one another – which gives you the sensation of face-to-face instruction with a leading expert. Shy? Then you don’t have to switch your webcam on. And if you miss one of your regular sessions, you can catch up with the workout via the ‘Recording’ tab – something that you can’t do when you miss your favourite gym class. It’s great for mums, newbies and anyone who wants to try a specific class that might not be available in your area. This site comes thoroughly recommended.  GREAT FOR wellbeing goalsLES MILLS ON DEMAND£9.95 per month; lesmillsondemand.com               If you’re already au fait with the popular Les Mills gym classes – think Body Pump, Body Combat, Body Balance or Grit – you’re going to love On Demand because you can do the same workouts from home when you can’t make it to the gym. On the other hand, if you’re new to Les Mills exercise, this is a great place to start – you can build plenty of confidence before trying these workouts at the gym with others. Les Mills Junior recommends that newbies start with the kit-free 20-minute Grit Cardio class. But, if that’s not your thing, view the ‘Introduction’ videos to discover which class whets your appetite. There’s a really great variety of workouts on the site but it’s worth bearing in mind that some, such as Body Pump or RPM, do require kit. Still, On Demand cannot be faulted for its great playlists, fantastic workouts and non-stop instructor enthusiasm. And there’s even an exercise video for kids!

Duncan Goodhew’s top five breastroke tips

10 February 2016

There's nothing like signing up for a challenge to give your workouts a boost. If you love swimming, why not try the Sainsbury's Sport Relief Swimathon, a non-competitive swim event taking place in over 600 pools across the UK from March 9-20. Choose from 1.5, 2.5 or 5k (just visit the website and enter your postcode to find your nearest event) or pick a pool and distance of your choice and complete it between March 9 and 20.To help you prepare, we spoke to Olympic swimming legend Duncan Goodhew to find out how to perfect your breaststroke.1. Don’t pull your arms out too wide (45 degrees is enough) or take them back too far – imagine you’re scooping out a mixing bowl in front of your chest with your hands!2. Hunch your shoulders up and in as you lunge forwards to reduce your drag in the water.3. Think about creating a huge ‘snap’ of power at the end of your stroke as you bring your legs together and throw yourself forwards.4. Make sure your big toes touch together as you create a ‘flick’ at the end of the leg kick.5. Don’t let your knees drift down at the end of the stroke – this will create unnecessary drag – lift your ankles up towards your backside as you finish the stroke.Duncan Goodhew is encouraging everyone to get behind Sport Relief by signing up to swim themselves proud at the Sainsbury's Sport Relief Swimathon on March 18-20. You can enter alone or in a team of up to 5 people, £12 for adults and £26 for a team. To find out more, visit sportrelief.com.

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss0 Comments

15 ways to upgrade your gym workout

10 February 2016

1.Try outdoor bootcamps… inside!Such is the success of outdoor bootcamp classes, they’re now coming to the gym floor. ‘We’re seeing a lot of “outdoor-style” activity in the gym,’ says Technogym master trainer Steve Harrison (technogym.com). ‘They involve plenty of space, lots of running drills, small group interactions and shorter, sharper classes.’ Bootcamp classes are varied, improving your cardio fitness and stamina as you’ll be running, doing intervals and encountering obstacles. You’ll also boost your  strength using dumbbells, resistance bands or your own bodyweight for resistance. Some classes even add in some yoga poses to help your flexibility. You may focus on upper body and abs one week, then lower body the next, giving good variety. Pumping music will get you motivated.TRY: David Lloyd’s Orangetheory class, for example, is a 60-minute session for up to 20 people. Like a Bootcamp class, it also consists of cardio and strength-training intervals, featuring treadmills, rowing machines and weight-training blocks. It’s claimed to burn at least 500 calories per class.2. Form a groupCreate a mini workout club at the gym. Devise your own group circuits, or train together on the cardio machines. You’ll burn more calories when training with friends. A study of 1,000 women carried by Virgin Active shows that women who exercise with friends burn up to 236 calories, compared to 195 for those who train alone. The study also showed that 64 per cent of women push themselves harder when training with friends. ‘I can see more and more people forming HIIT groups and working out together,’ says personal trainer Philip Kasumu, an ambassador for BioSynergy. ‘Training alone can be daunting and working out together is a great way to socialise.’TRY: Forming a group with friends and working as hard as you can in HIIT sessions. Go to a HIIT-based class for inspiration, then do your own to suit your availability.3. Be the bossWant some one-on-one advice but don’t like the idea of being bossed around by a PT? Good news. There’s a new, more empathetic breed of personal trainer, re-shaping themselves as lifestyle coaches and trying to find out what really makes you tick. The result? You get to take control of the sessions. ‘I tell trainers to let the client lead the workout,’ says Harrison. ‘There’s no point having a varied workout if the client doesn’t like it. I encourage personal trainers to ask the client: “Do you think you’d like to run?” “What sort of activities did you enjoy on holiday and how can you bring them back into daily life?” The aim is to get people relaxed and to have fun.’TRY: Tell a prospective personal trainer what exercises you like and dislike. A good trainer should be willing to ditch those you don’t enjoy and offer alternatives.4. Train for an eventCompeting in an event such as a triathlon or a 10K run is one of the best ways to boost your motivation to train. Too daunted to sign up? Many gyms are now offering classes to help you get fit for triathlons and races, with classes ranging from triathlon training to express treadmill classes.TRY: Some Nuffield Health clubs run Express treadmill classes lasting just 15 minutes and aimed at setting the right pace for you and improving confidence, which is ideal for new runners or those training for their first 5K.5. Make it shortGyms know your time is precious, so increasingly, they’re offering express classes to get you fit in half the time of regular ones.Afterwards, your metabolic rate will be elevated, meaning calories burned at a faster rate post-exercise. Kettlebells are great for improving your strength and power, while also giving you a cardio workout, as your heart rate will soar, even while you’re doing the basic kettlebell swing. ‘During a shorter session, you tend to push yourself harder and the results are long lasting,’ says Harrison.TRY: Nuffield Health offers Express Kettlebells classes and Express Circuits that work your whole body in half an hour. Both are high intensity, so your heart rate will rise and you’ll burn optimum fat and calories.6 Train in 3DIt’s all too easy to focus on exercises that involve moving in a straight line, such as squats or forward lunges. Yet in real life, we move in all sorts of directions. We rotate our bodies diagonally, twisting, turning and bending in many directions. Even when we run, we have to twist and turn to avoid pedestrians, other obstacles and potholes. So it makes sense that your training routine should reflect daily movements. ‘I like to incorporate functional training into my workouts,’ says personal trainer and fitness model Phoebe Robinson Galvin, an ambassador for Bio-Synergy. ‘We work on rotational lunges, rotational ball throws and standing ball cable woodchop, as I believe working in this range of motion helps to prevent injury.’Multi-directional training will also help to improve sports performance, as many sports, including tennis, squash and football, involve multi-directional movement.TRY: Nuffield Health and Virgin Active offer ViPR classes, where you move the cylinder in all directions, twisting and turning it across your body. You could also do moves such as hip crossovers on a Swiss ball.7. Devise your own circuit sessionIf you want a flatter belly but don’t have time to join a circuit class, set up your own workstations – high-intensity circuit training is an effective way to reduce abdominal fat, reports the American College of Sports Medicine.Circuit-style training is one of the fastest ways to improve your cardiovascular fitness and muscular endurance, giving you a lean and toned body. And it’s easy to devise your own 20-minute circuit.Make sure you have plenty of room and build in adequate rest breaks. Try setting up six workstations, then perform a minute on each workstation and move to the next one without resting, then rest at the end of one complete circuit. If this is too strenuous, reduce the work period on each station down to 40 or 30 seconds, then complete the circuit and have a minute’s rest, or rest for up to two minutes if you need more time to recover in between circuits. Depending on which body parts you want to work, you can set the circuit up in several ways: either to focus on a particular body part – such as doing three abdominal exercises back to back, (crunches, twists and reverse curls) or legs (deadlift, squats, step-ups) or you can alternate between upper and lower body exercises.If space is limited, it may be safer to bring in more bodyweight exercises that require less equipment, such as squats, box press-ups and crunches.If you’re new to circuits or new to exercise, it’s best to work on technique and perform each exercise at a slower pace to reduce injury risk. If you’re fitter or familiar with the exercises, you can perform each rep at a faster pace.TRY: Squats, Push-ups, Kettlebell swings, Shoulder presses, Bench dips and Ab crunches. Rest for a minute at the end of the circuit, then repeat twice more. Make sure you stretch afterwards.8. Be ahead of the restKeep your fitness ahead of the game and keep your motivation sky high by being the first to try new kit when it appears on the gym floor.TRY: Some Fitness First and Virgin Active gyms now have Woodway Curve Treadmills in their gyms, which are self-powered. There’s no motor or button – the treadmill works by your own effort. Walking on a Woodway Curve could give you the same cardio workout as running on a motorised machine. Powering yourself means you burn 30 per cent more calories than on a normal treadmill. The harder you run, the more power you generate. The curve shape of the belt also means less impact on knees and joints, and it works your core, too.9. Lift your own weight Using your own body weight for resistance (with exercises such as press-ups and pull-ups) is a great way to get really strong and toned. Many gyms are now offering gymnastic rings, TRX machines or rigs consisting of ropes and pulleys to help you improve upper-body strength and build up to supporting your own bodyweight.TRY: Use a TRX Suspension Trainer to do squats, reverse lunges, side lunges, chest press, rows for your upper back and many more moves. Change your body position to add or decrease resistance. For example, if you’re doing rows, the lower the angle of your body to the ground, the more of your own body weight you’re lifting. Remember to engage your core muscles while doing the exercises to support your body and strengthen your abs.10 Beat the plateauIt’s easy to get stuck in a training rut or think you’re not improving. Checking your progress every four weeks will help you see how far you’ve come. For instance, if weight loss is your goal, you can check your body fat every four weeks (try the Omron BF306 Body Composition Monitor, £31.98 at www.amazon.co.uk). Having a varied training programme will also boost motivation and prevent boredom. ‘Continuous training with a clear goal in mind will get results. I keep measurements to track progress every few weeks,’ says personal trainer Carl Wallace from PureGym in Stoke says. ‘Change your workouts week-by-week, focusing on both cardio and resistance training. This will keep sessions fun and interesting.’ Another way to track progress is to set regular fitness tests.TRY: Run 1K on the treadmill as fast as you can, record your time, and try to beat it four weeks later, after running regularly. Or complete 5K on the cross-trainer, again recording your time and try to complete it in less time in four weeks.11. Find a swimming coachIf you did a lot of swimming on holiday, why not keep it up and improve? Hiring a swim coach can give you a better workout because if your swimming technique is stronger, you’ll be more efficient. This means you’ll have the energy to keep swimming for longer, burning more calories and making you fitter, plus improving your endurance.TRY: Fitness First has a number of clubs offering Swimming Nature, a tailored instructional swimming programme, while Nuffield Health offers Swimfit classes. ‘Around 95 per cent of our centres have swimming pools and most of these offer swim schools,’ says Sarah Henderson, communications manager for Nuffield Health.  12. Count time, not repsIf you want to burn more calories, forget about counting the number of reps for each set of an exercise – try ‘time under tension’ instead. This simply means timing your exercises, rather than counting reps.‘Remember, if you’re burning more calories, you’re burning more fat.’ It will also improve your strength too. A study published online in the Journal of Physiology showed that slower lifting movements create more strength.TRY: ‘Do 30-45 seconds flat doing as many reps as you can, which will burn more calories than counting reps without worrying about a time limit,’ says Anthony Mendoza, David Lloyd platinum personal trainer.13. Create an ‘afterburn’ Rather than just focusing on how many calories you’ve burned in your workout, create a fat-burning effect that lasts way beyond the session. ‘Triggering excess post-exercise consumption (EPOC) or ‘afterburn’ is crucial in prolonging the benefit of a session, as calories can continue to be burnt for up to 36-48 hours post workout,’ says personal trainer Alastair Crew. ‘I use a heart rate monitor to help gauge the correct intensity for myself and my clients – in a typical workout I’d like to achieve a minimum of 12-20 minutes at 84 per cent of maximum heart rate in order to trigger the EPOC effect.’EPOC, also known as ‘oxygen debt’, is the amount of oxygen needed to return your body to normal after a workout. Exercise that places a greater demand on the body can increase the need for oxygen after a workout, creating the EPOC effect. High-intensity interval training is the most effective way to stimulate an EPOC effect.TRY: To work out your maximum heart rate, deduct your age from 220.14. Make cycling harderDitch the stationary bike and check out the Wattbike. It’s a serious way to burn more calories. The Wattbike can measure your power, your pedalling technique and heart rate, giving you instant feedback on your progress. It has a dual braking system, offering gears and a braking system on the flywheel to create the feeling of climbing hills. As it’s like a normal bike, it’s easy to vary the intensity and choose between sprints and climbs.Try: The Watt Bike is available in David Lloyd health, Nuffield Health clubs, 29 Fitness First clubs and many Virgin Active gyms, while PureGyms have similar bikes called Matrix.15. Beat the PlateauIt’s easy to get stuck in a training rut or think you’re not improving. ‘Change your workouts week-by-week, focusing on both cardio and resistance training. This will keep sessions fun and interesting,’ says personal trainer Carl Wallace from PureGym in Stoke. Another way to track your progress is to set regular fitness tests.TRY: Run 1K on the treadmill as fast as you can, record your time, and try to beat it four weeks later, after running regularly in the intervening period. Or complete 5K on the cross-trainer, again recording your time and then try to do it in less time four weeks later.

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss, Weight Training0 Comments

Why we love cycling

10 February 2016

Jumping on a shiny new steed and pedalling off into the sunset is a glorious feeling – you just can’t beat it! But if you haven’t saddled up for a few years, you may be wondering where to start or why to bother. Don’t worry! We caught up with Gareth Turner from Cyclebeat (cyclebeat.co.uk) to chat about the benefits of life on two wheels and how you can get back in the race. Slim cycleJumping on your bike is a fantastic way to blitz calories and trim down. ‘Cycling is a great way to lose weight and a brilliant way to burn calories – you can burn around 500 calories an hour cycling and sometimes much more,’ says Gareth. ‘Cycling can also have the added benefit of increasing your metabolism – even after the ride is over.And it’s a great option for working out on your commute. Think about it – you can get your workouts in on the way to and from work and cancel that gym membership altogether if you want! ‘And, because it is a non-weight bearing exercise, it’s a lot easier on the joints than something like running, so you can do it more often,’ says Gareth. Sounds good to us!It’s also a great toner, working your lower body hard, which – thanks to this focus on the bigger muscles in your body (bum and legs!) also burns fat. ‘Cycling helps to tone your muscles and works your calves, thighs and bottom, while also giving your shoulders and arms a workout, too,’ says Gareth.Healthy heartCycling is not only bags of fun, and a great way to stay in shape, it’s good for your heart, too. ‘Cycling improves cardiovascular fitness,’ explains Gareth. ‘And the British Heart Foundation says that cycling regularly can help to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes by up to 50 per cent.’ Mind mattersAnd getting on your bike could have benefits for the mind, too. ‘It’s not just the body that sees the benefits, as cycling is believed to reduce stress, anxiety and provide a sense of wellbeing,’ says Gareth. A cycle home after a long day is a great way to shake off your worries.Wheely wheely funWhizzing around on a bike gives you a great sense of freedom and there are so many types of cycling, and types of bikes, you can try. ‘Cycling can be very varied and fun – try mountain bike trails, exhilarating downhills, BMX and road biking with amazing views,’ says Gareth. Plus it’s one of the few workouts in which you can have a good gas with your mates, too! Have you every tried catching up over a quick swim or disco rave class?! ‘Cycling can be very social by riding in a group and also with the family – everyone can get involved,’ adds Gareth. 

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss0 Comments

Interview: Barbara Currie’s Yoga Secrets

10 February 2016

For almost 40 years, leading UK yoga guru, Barbara Currie, has been spreading the yoga word with her yoga books, videos, classes and TV appearances. Now the incredibly youthful Currie is launching a new You Tube yoga channel – Barbara Currie Yoga, to help as many people as possible reap the incredible benefits of yoga. We caught up with her to find out more. Is yoga your secret to staying healthy and youthful?“I teach yoga everyday, five times a day. I don’t do any other exercise apart from swimming occasionally and walking. I’m energetic and everything is working well health-wise, so I’d have to say yoga is my secret.” What are you other anti-ageing secrets?“I don’t have any really. I have a healthy diet, excluding additives by eating a ‘stone age diet’ of only chicken, fish, veg, fruit and salads.”Why is yoga a good complement to a regular fitness regime?“It keeps you flexible because it helps the spine. You’ll increase your level of focus and, most importantly, sleep better.” What are the best yoga postures for building fitness?“All yoga helps. It really depends on what you consider as fitness. Overall it will improve your energy and ability without strain.” What should readers look for in a yoga class if they’re just starting out?“You know you’ve found the right class when you feel good afterwards. You should feel no strain during or after. If you didn’t enjoy it, find another class.” Tell us about your new Youtube channel – what will it offer?“I started my YouTube channel in response to many of my students asking for yoga which they could do a little bit of everyday. The YouTube videos are three to five minutes long and allow you to gradually learn yoga at your own pace, with short and manageable sections each day. This means you can gradually tone and firm your muscles and joints and keep them flexible, focusing on different sections each day to make sure the whole body is covered. You can take it at an individual speed and learn to practise yoga everyday, in your own home, whenever you have the chance or would like to do a short, weekly YouTube-led session.” www.youtube.com/BarbaraCurrieYoga

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss0 Comments

4 Best on-demand fitness networks

10 February 2016

GREAT FOR gym fitness goalsMATT ROBERTS BODY.NETWORK£15 per month; Body.NetworkThe Netflix of the workout world, Body Network boasts a holistic mix of health and fitness videos that have been put together by some of the UK’s leading experts. Not just workouts, the network also provides rehabilitation programmes, a tri-part introduction to mindfulness and meditation, and nutritional programmes. It has everything that you need to hone a fitter, healthier and more efficient body. Unlike other on-demand services, this network caters for outdoor as well as indoor exercisers. The 10K training plan from running expert Charlie Webster is designed to help you hit a 6.2-mile goal, including interval workout audio sessions that you can take with you on your run. The Get Fit for Cycling series aims to improve cycling performance, a great option for off-season bike training. And if you don’t care about exercising outside, there’s a host of popular gym and home workouts, too, such as Pilates, yoga, post-natal exercise and boxing programmes. A lot of the workouts are periodised in that they start at a beginner level and progress to advanced training, which means you don’t only work out, but also learn the techniques needed to perform exercise properly. The Body Network educates as well as makes you sweat!GREAT FOR performance goalsBEACH BODY ON DEMAND£2.99 per week; beachbody.co.ukBeach Body pioneers some of the most popular workouts worldwide – we’re talking Insanity, PiYo, P90X – so this really is the place to come if you want to be ahead of the game. There are ‘sneak peek’ workouts of up-and-coming programmes, such as Shaun T’s Cize or Hammer & Chisel, in which you get to try the latest sessions first. Plus, Q&A videos with the top trainers reveal a few insider secrets! And if you don’t have a clue what workout to do, there’s even a ‘challenge du jour’ session, which will keep you on your toes every day you log in. The best bit, however, is that Beach Body On Demand (BOD) isn’t exclusively for the super-fit; it’s great for all levels, whether you follow Autumn Calabrese’s Active Maternity programme or the sports-friendly Insanity The Asylum schedule. A lot of the programmes are time-orientated – there’s the 21-day fix or the 90-day P90x plan – so it’s a great website to sign up to if you have a shape-up goal for 2016. It’s really easy to use and you can even stream it via the On Demand app to devices such as tablets, Apple TV or Amazon Fire TV. Handy.GREAT FOR shape-up goalsYOOGAIA£14.99 per month; yoogaia.comCan’t find a yoga class that you love? You need to log onto Yoogaia. The online yoga studio provides live classes across a range of low-impact disciplines including Pilates, barre, core exercise and, of course, yoga. There’s a packed schedule with daily workouts such as Yin Yoga Stretch or Barre Cardio Express available for you to book onto. The live workouts happen via your webcam – the instructor can see you and you can see the instructor but exercisers can’t see one another – which gives you the sensation of face-to-face instruction with a leading expert. Shy? Then you don’t have to switch your webcam on. And if you miss one of your regular sessions, you can catch up with the workout via the ‘Recording’ tab – something that you can’t do when you miss your favourite gym class. It’s great for mums, newbies and anyone who wants to try a specific class that might not be available in your area. This site comes thoroughly recommended.  GREAT FOR wellbeing goalsLES MILLS ON DEMAND£9.95 per month; lesmillsondemand.com               If you’re already au fait with the popular Les Mills gym classes – think Body Pump, Body Combat, Body Balance or Grit – you’re going to love On Demand because you can do the same workouts from home when you can’t make it to the gym. On the other hand, if you’re new to Les Mills exercise, this is a great place to start – you can build plenty of confidence before trying these workouts at the gym with others. Les Mills Junior recommends that newbies start with the kit-free 20-minute Grit Cardio class. But, if that’s not your thing, view the ‘Introduction’ videos to discover which class whets your appetite. There’s a really great variety of workouts on the site but it’s worth bearing in mind that some, such as Body Pump or RPM, do require kit. Still, On Demand cannot be faulted for its great playlists, fantastic workouts and non-stop instructor enthusiasm. And there’s even an exercise video for kids!

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss0 Comments

10 ways to be more active

09 February 2016

1 Choose the furthest cornerInstead of fighting for parking spots closest to the supermarket doors, park your car as far away as possible. This gives you the opportunity to walk further, for longer – and it’s less stressful, too.2 Skip the liftStop taking the lift and take the stairs instead. It’ll get your heart pumping and body moving to build your fitness levels, plus climbing the stairs requires your bum, thigh and calf muscles to engage, helping to tone and sculpt your legs – a win-win!3 Walk the last stopIf you commute to work by bus, jump off one stop early – or even two! – to increasethe distance you walk. Not only will thisadd in some extra cardio exercise to yourday – particularly if you march at a fast pace – it’ll burn a few extra calories, too.  4 Get pedallingBoost your fitness by cycling to and from work. It’s a great way to get two cardio workouts into your day without having to take time out to exercise. Cycling is also a great way to tone up and keep those calories burning 5 Use your lunch hourInstead of staying glued to your computer screen, use your lunch hour for some retail therapy or a wander in the park. Just 20 minutes walking around the block, will help perk you up and boost your motivation. And, of course, it will add that extra bit of physical activity into your day. In fact, according to a recent study conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratoryin California, walking briskly can lower your risk of high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes as much as running. Walk on!6 Leave your car at homeIf you have kids, walk them to school instead of driving, if it’s close enough. Not only will you start your day with a spring in your step, but walking to school will also encourage your kids to be more active, and it also helps reduce pollution. If walking isn’t an option, why not take them to the park after school or to the swings to play? And make sure you run around as much as your kids do!7 Stand up more!While talking on the phone, whether at home or in the office, get out of your chair and stand up or pace up and down. As well as helping you to focus on the conversation, this can have real benefits for your health. A study by Dr John Buckley and a team of researchers from the University of Chester proved that standing for a total of three hours each day will burn up an extra 144 calories. Over a year, that adds up to about 30,000 more calories or eight pounds of fat!8 Be a touristInstead of the usual catch-up over coffee and cake or dinner, why not arrangea jog around the park with a friend insteador book onto a sightseeing tour around your nearest city. You’ll still have a chance to chat, but you’ll get in a bit of extra cardio, too.9 Get your groove onSpending your evenings slumped in front of the TV after a stressful day at work? Why not create a playlist of some of your favourite songs and have a dance around your bedroom for 15 minutes (or longer!) instead? Or look up dance classes you can join in your area. Not only does dancinghelp boost self-confidence, but it’s a great chance to get a sweat on and burn some extra calories. A study published by the American Council on Exercise found that dance-based workouts can burn 200-400 calories per hour – almost as much as you burn swimming, cycling or walking. 10 Invest in a pedometerRecord the number of steps you take each day with a pedometer. Then challenge yourself to increase the number every day or have a competition with your partneror friend to see who can bank the most steps. This will boost your motivationand get you more active

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss0 Comments

Duncan Goodhew’s top five breastroke tips

09 February 2016

There's nothing like signing up for a challenge to give your workouts a boost. If you love swimming, why not try the Sainsbury's Sport Relief Swimathon, a non-competitive swim event taking place in over 600 pools across the UK from March 9-20. Choose from 1.5, 2.5 or 5k (just visit the website and enter your postcode to find your nearest event) or pick a pool and distance of your choice and complete it between March 9 and 20.To help you prepare, we spoke to Olympic swimming legend Duncan Goodhew to find out how to perfect your breaststroke.1. Don’t pull your arms out too wide (45 degrees is enough) or take them back too far – imagine you’re scooping out a mixing bowl in front of your chest with your hands!2. Hunch your shoulders up and in as you lunge forwards to reduce your drag in the water.3. Think about creating a huge ‘snap’ of power at the end of your stroke as you bring your legs together and throw yourself forwards.4. Make sure your big toes touch together as you create a ‘flick’ at the end of the leg kick.5. Don’t let your knees drift down at the end of the stroke – this will create unnecessary drag – lift your ankles up towards your backside as you finish the stroke.Duncan Goodhew is encouraging everyone to get behind Sport Relief by signing up to swim themselves proud at the Sainsbury's Sport Relief Swimathon on March 18-20. You can enter alone or in a team of up to 5 people, £12 for adults and £26 for a team. To find out more, visit sportrelief.com.

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Health Issues, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss0 Comments

15 ways to upgrade your gym workout

09 February 2016

1.Try outdoor bootcamps… inside!Such is the success of outdoor bootcamp classes, they’re now coming to the gym floor. ‘We’re seeing a lot of “outdoor-style” activity in the gym,’ says Technogym master trainer Steve Harrison (technogym.com). ‘They involve plenty of space, lots of running drills, small group interactions and shorter, sharper classes.’ Bootcamp classes are varied, improving your cardio fitness and stamina as you’ll be running, doing intervals and encountering obstacles. You’ll also boost your  strength using dumbbells, resistance bands or your own bodyweight for resistance. Some classes even add in some yoga poses to help your flexibility. You may focus on upper body and abs one week, then lower body the next, giving good variety. Pumping music will get you motivated.TRY: David Lloyd’s Orangetheory class, for example, is a 60-minute session for up to 20 people. Like a Bootcamp class, it also consists of cardio and strength-training intervals, featuring treadmills, rowing machines and weight-training blocks. It’s claimed to burn at least 500 calories per class.2. Form a groupCreate a mini workout club at the gym. Devise your own group circuits, or train together on the cardio machines. You’ll burn more calories when training with friends. A study of 1,000 women carried by Virgin Active shows that women who exercise with friends burn up to 236 calories, compared to 195 for those who train alone. The study also showed that 64 per cent of women push themselves harder when training with friends. ‘I can see more and more people forming HIIT groups and working out together,’ says personal trainer Philip Kasumu, an ambassador for BioSynergy. ‘Training alone can be daunting and working out together is a great way to socialise.’TRY: Forming a group with friends and working as hard as you can in HIIT sessions. Go to a HIIT-based class for inspiration, then do your own to suit your availability.3. Be the bossWant some one-on-one advice but don’t like the idea of being bossed around by a PT? Good news. There’s a new, more empathetic breed of personal trainer, re-shaping themselves as lifestyle coaches and trying to find out what really makes you tick. The result? You get to take control of the sessions. ‘I tell trainers to let the client lead the workout,’ says Harrison. ‘There’s no point having a varied workout if the client doesn’t like it. I encourage personal trainers to ask the client: “Do you think you’d like to run?” “What sort of activities did you enjoy on holiday and how can you bring them back into daily life?” The aim is to get people relaxed and to have fun.’TRY: Tell a prospective personal trainer what exercises you like and dislike. A good trainer should be willing to ditch those you don’t enjoy and offer alternatives.4. Train for an eventCompeting in an event such as a triathlon or a 10K run is one of the best ways to boost your motivation to train. Too daunted to sign up? Many gyms are now offering classes to help you get fit for triathlons and races, with classes ranging from triathlon training to express treadmill classes.TRY: Some Nuffield Health clubs run Express treadmill classes lasting just 15 minutes and aimed at setting the right pace for you and improving confidence, which is ideal for new runners or those training for their first 5K.5. Make it shortGyms know your time is precious, so increasingly, they’re offering express classes to get you fit in half the time of regular ones.Afterwards, your metabolic rate will be elevated, meaning calories burned at a faster rate post-exercise. Kettlebells are great for improving your strength and power, while also giving you a cardio workout, as your heart rate will soar, even while you’re doing the basic kettlebell swing. ‘During a shorter session, you tend to push yourself harder and the results are long lasting,’ says Harrison.TRY: Nuffield Health offers Express Kettlebells classes and Express Circuits that work your whole body in half an hour. Both are high intensity, so your heart rate will rise and you’ll burn optimum fat and calories.6 Train in 3DIt’s all too easy to focus on exercises that involve moving in a straight line, such as squats or forward lunges. Yet in real life, we move in all sorts of directions. We rotate our bodies diagonally, twisting, turning and bending in many directions. Even when we run, we have to twist and turn to avoid pedestrians, other obstacles and potholes. So it makes sense that your training routine should reflect daily movements. ‘I like to incorporate functional training into my workouts,’ says personal trainer and fitness model Phoebe Robinson Galvin, an ambassador for Bio-Synergy. ‘We work on rotational lunges, rotational ball throws and standing ball cable woodchop, as I believe working in this range of motion helps to prevent injury.’Multi-directional training will also help to improve sports performance, as many sports, including tennis, squash and football, involve multi-directional movement.TRY: Nuffield Health and Virgin Active offer ViPR classes, where you move the cylinder in all directions, twisting and turning it across your body. You could also do moves such as hip crossovers on a Swiss ball.7. Devise your own circuit sessionIf you want a flatter belly but don’t have time to join a circuit class, set up your own workstations – high-intensity circuit training is an effective way to reduce abdominal fat, reports the American College of Sports Medicine.Circuit-style training is one of the fastest ways to improve your cardiovascular fitness and muscular endurance, giving you a lean and toned body. And it’s easy to devise your own 20-minute circuit.Make sure you have plenty of room and build in adequate rest breaks. Try setting up six workstations, then perform a minute on each workstation and move to the next one without resting, then rest at the end of one complete circuit. If this is too strenuous, reduce the work period on each station down to 40 or 30 seconds, then complete the circuit and have a minute’s rest, or rest for up to two minutes if you need more time to recover in between circuits. Depending on which body parts you want to work, you can set the circuit up in several ways: either to focus on a particular body part – such as doing three abdominal exercises back to back, (crunches, twists and reverse curls) or legs (deadlift, squats, step-ups) or you can alternate between upper and lower body exercises.If space is limited, it may be safer to bring in more bodyweight exercises that require less equipment, such as squats, box press-ups and crunches.If you’re new to circuits or new to exercise, it’s best to work on technique and perform each exercise at a slower pace to reduce injury risk. If you’re fitter or familiar with the exercises, you can perform each rep at a faster pace.TRY: Squats, Push-ups, Kettlebell swings, Shoulder presses, Bench dips and Ab crunches. Rest for a minute at the end of the circuit, then repeat twice more. Make sure you stretch afterwards.8. Be ahead of the restKeep your fitness ahead of the game and keep your motivation sky high by being the first to try new kit when it appears on the gym floor.TRY: Some Fitness First and Virgin Active gyms now have Woodway Curve Treadmills in their gyms, which are self-powered. There’s no motor or button – the treadmill works by your own effort. Walking on a Woodway Curve could give you the same cardio workout as running on a motorised machine. Powering yourself means you burn 30 per cent more calories than on a normal treadmill. The harder you run, the more power you generate. The curve shape of the belt also means less impact on knees and joints, and it works your core, too.9. Lift your own weight Using your own body weight for resistance (with exercises such as press-ups and pull-ups) is a great way to get really strong and toned. Many gyms are now offering gymnastic rings, TRX machines or rigs consisting of ropes and pulleys to help you improve upper-body strength and build up to supporting your own bodyweight.TRY: Use a TRX Suspension Trainer to do squats, reverse lunges, side lunges, chest press, rows for your upper back and many more moves. Change your body position to add or decrease resistance. For example, if you’re doing rows, the lower the angle of your body to the ground, the more of your own body weight you’re lifting. Remember to engage your core muscles while doing the exercises to support your body and strengthen your abs.10 Beat the plateauIt’s easy to get stuck in a training rut or think you’re not improving. Checking your progress every four weeks will help you see how far you’ve come. For instance, if weight loss is your goal, you can check your body fat every four weeks (try the Omron BF306 Body Composition Monitor, £31.98 at www.amazon.co.uk). Having a varied training programme will also boost motivation and prevent boredom. ‘Continuous training with a clear goal in mind will get results. I keep measurements to track progress every few weeks,’ says personal trainer Carl Wallace from PureGym in Stoke says. ‘Change your workouts week-by-week, focusing on both cardio and resistance training. This will keep sessions fun and interesting.’ Another way to track progress is to set regular fitness tests.TRY: Run 1K on the treadmill as fast as you can, record your time, and try to beat it four weeks later, after running regularly. Or complete 5K on the cross-trainer, again recording your time and try to complete it in less time in four weeks.11. Find a swimming coachIf you did a lot of swimming on holiday, why not keep it up and improve? Hiring a swim coach can give you a better workout because if your swimming technique is stronger, you’ll be more efficient. This means you’ll have the energy to keep swimming for longer, burning more calories and making you fitter, plus improving your endurance.TRY: Fitness First has a number of clubs offering Swimming Nature, a tailored instructional swimming programme, while Nuffield Health offers Swimfit classes. ‘Around 95 per cent of our centres have swimming pools and most of these offer swim schools,’ says Sarah Henderson, communications manager for Nuffield Health.  12. Count time, not repsIf you want to burn more calories, forget about counting the number of reps for each set of an exercise – try ‘time under tension’ instead. This simply means timing your exercises, rather than counting reps.‘Remember, if you’re burning more calories, you’re burning more fat.’ It will also improve your strength too. A study published online in the Journal of Physiology showed that slower lifting movements create more strength.TRY: ‘Do 30-45 seconds flat doing as many reps as you can, which will burn more calories than counting reps without worrying about a time limit,’ says Anthony Mendoza, David Lloyd platinum personal trainer.13. Create an ‘afterburn’ Rather than just focusing on how many calories you’ve burned in your workout, create a fat-burning effect that lasts way beyond the session. ‘Triggering excess post-exercise consumption (EPOC) or ‘afterburn’ is crucial in prolonging the benefit of a session, as calories can continue to be burnt for up to 36-48 hours post workout,’ says personal trainer Alastair Crew. ‘I use a heart rate monitor to help gauge the correct intensity for myself and my clients – in a typical workout I’d like to achieve a minimum of 12-20 minutes at 84 per cent of maximum heart rate in order to trigger the EPOC effect.’EPOC, also known as ‘oxygen debt’, is the amount of oxygen needed to return your body to normal after a workout. Exercise that places a greater demand on the body can increase the need for oxygen after a workout, creating the EPOC effect. High-intensity interval training is the most effective way to stimulate an EPOC effect.TRY: To work out your maximum heart rate, deduct your age from 220.14. Make cycling harderDitch the stationary bike and check out the Wattbike. It’s a serious way to burn more calories. The Wattbike can measure your power, your pedalling technique and heart rate, giving you instant feedback on your progress. It has a dual braking system, offering gears and a braking system on the flywheel to create the feeling of climbing hills. As it’s like a normal bike, it’s easy to vary the intensity and choose between sprints and climbs.Try: The Watt Bike is available in David Lloyd health, Nuffield Health clubs, 29 Fitness First clubs and many Virgin Active gyms, while PureGyms have similar bikes called Matrix.15. Beat the PlateauIt’s easy to get stuck in a training rut or think you’re not improving. ‘Change your workouts week-by-week, focusing on both cardio and resistance training. This will keep sessions fun and interesting,’ says personal trainer Carl Wallace from PureGym in Stoke. Another way to track your progress is to set regular fitness tests.TRY: Run 1K on the treadmill as fast as you can, record your time, and try to beat it four weeks later, after running regularly in the intervening period. Or complete 5K on the cross-trainer, again recording your time and then try to do it in less time four weeks later.

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Health Issues, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss, Weight Training0 Comments

Why we love cycling

09 February 2016

Jumping on a shiny new steed and pedalling off into the sunset is a glorious feeling – you just can’t beat it! But if you haven’t saddled up for a few years, you may be wondering where to start or why to bother. Don’t worry! We caught up with Gareth Turner from Cyclebeat (cyclebeat.co.uk) to chat about the benefits of life on two wheels and how you can get back in the race. Slim cycleJumping on your bike is a fantastic way to blitz calories and trim down. ‘Cycling is a great way to lose weight and a brilliant way to burn calories – you can burn around 500 calories an hour cycling and sometimes much more,’ says Gareth. ‘Cycling can also have the added benefit of increasing your metabolism – even after the ride is over.And it’s a great option for working out on your commute. Think about it – you can get your workouts in on the way to and from work and cancel that gym membership altogether if you want! ‘And, because it is a non-weight bearing exercise, it’s a lot easier on the joints than something like running, so you can do it more often,’ says Gareth. Sounds good to us!It’s also a great toner, working your lower body hard, which – thanks to this focus on the bigger muscles in your body (bum and legs!) also burns fat. ‘Cycling helps to tone your muscles and works your calves, thighs and bottom, while also giving your shoulders and arms a workout, too,’ says Gareth.Healthy heartCycling is not only bags of fun, and a great way to stay in shape, it’s good for your heart, too. ‘Cycling improves cardiovascular fitness,’ explains Gareth. ‘And the British Heart Foundation says that cycling regularly can help to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes by up to 50 per cent.’ Mind mattersAnd getting on your bike could have benefits for the mind, too. ‘It’s not just the body that sees the benefits, as cycling is believed to reduce stress, anxiety and provide a sense of wellbeing,’ says Gareth. A cycle home after a long day is a great way to shake off your worries.Wheely wheely funWhizzing around on a bike gives you a great sense of freedom and there are so many types of cycling, and types of bikes, you can try. ‘Cycling can be very varied and fun – try mountain bike trails, exhilarating downhills, BMX and road biking with amazing views,’ says Gareth. Plus it’s one of the few workouts in which you can have a good gas with your mates, too! Have you every tried catching up over a quick swim or disco rave class?! ‘Cycling can be very social by riding in a group and also with the family – everyone can get involved,’ adds Gareth. 

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Exercises, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss0 Comments

Get your tickets for The Color Run now

09 February 2016

The Color Run presented by Skittles - dubbed the happiest 5k on the planet - is back this year. And if it wasn’t already one of the most fun events around, they've added a new tropical twist for 2016.In January 2012 the first Color Run took place in the United States after the founder Travis Snyder had been inspired by the Indian Holi Festival. He then decided to mix colour with running, and since then it has exploded across the globe into what is now the single largest event series in the world, boasting over 300 events taking place in over 50 countries in 2014.Last year more than 59,000 runners took part in events across the UK - London alone saw 19,500 people take to Wembley Park to spread colour, happiness and joy while getting a little exercise, too.Participants are encouraged to take part in whatever way suits them, be it running, walking, dancing, skipping, or even partying through the course. The aim is to just have fun and get totally and utterly covered in colour. Sounds like an ideal way to work out to us.There are no timers or stopwatches, so you can just have fun soaking up the celebrations, atmosphere and, of course, colour. There is a surprise waiting at the end, though, so we wouldn’t suggest taking too long if you like to party.Everyone starts in a plain white t-shirt, and throughout the route there are different zones at each kilometre to paint every runner in an array of colours. There are only two rules: The first is to make sure you are wearing white at the start line and the second is to finish the event plastered in colour. And trust us, you won't be having any trouble there.The paint which forms the basis of The Color Run is 100 per cent natural, made from food grade cornstarch and will cause no harm to your skin or the environment. So there is no excuse not to get absolutely covered!This year there is also a new Tropicolor Rainbow Zone where a mixture of colours will be ready and waiting to cover participants from head to toe, while island- style music and palm trees will set the scene for a real fun feel on the way to the epic finish festival.But the party doesn’t stop when the course comes to an end. There is a festival with DJs, Color Run MCs, the legendary ‘Color Throws’ as well as amazing giveaways. Everyone is guaranteed to have an unforgettable experience and the best ever post-race party as a massive reward.There are also loads of goodies to get your hands on, limited edition t-shirts, Tropicolor headbands, fun temporary tattoos and more.The events this year are as follows:Sunday 12thJune 2016 - London, WembleySaturday 2ndJuly 2016 - Manchester, Etihad CampusSunday 17thJuly 2016 - City of GlasgowSaturday 20thAugust 2016 - Birmingham, NECSaturday 17thSeptember 2016 - Brighton, Madeira DriveDon’t wait around - grab your friends and get your tickets now if you don't want to miss out on the happiest run around.

Read the full story

Posted in Diets, Fitness Equipment, Nutrition, Sports nutrition, Weight loss0 Comments

BlogUpp!

Archives

February 2016
M T W T F S S
« Jan    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
29  
Content Protected Using Blog Protector By: PcDrome.